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IHtbrarg 



CORNELL STUDIES IN ENGLISH 

EDITED BY 

JOSEPH QUINCY ADAMS 

CLARK SUTHERLAND NORTHUP 

MARTIN WRIGHT SAMPSON 



A Dictionary of Actors 

and of Other Persons Associated with the PubHc 

Representation of Plays in England 

before 1642 



By 

Edwin Nungezer, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English in the 
University of Oklahoma 




ITHACA • NEW YORK 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY PRESS 

LONDON: HUMPHREY MILFORD 
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 



A Dictionary of Actors 

and of Other Persons Associated with the Public 

Representation of Plays in England 

before 1642 



By 

Edwin Nungezer, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English in the 
University of Oklahoma 




New Haven: Yale University Press 

London, Humphrey Milford 

Oxford University Press 

1929 






Copyright^ 1929, by Yale University Press. 
Printed in~fSe United States of America. 



PREFACE 

In this Dictionary I have attempted to assemble all the avail- 
able information regarding actors, theatrical proprietors, stage 
attendants, and other persons known to have been associated 
with the representation of plays in England before the year i64x. 
The resultant sketches, where records are deficient, inevitably 
suffer from brevity, and where scholarship has failed to clear up 
obscure problems in stage history, are marred by conjecture. 
From time to time, of course, fresh details will be added to our 
store of knowledge; in particular, not a little information re- 
mains to be gleaned from unexplored parish registers and court 
proceedings. Yet the bulk of what we are destined to know of 
Elizabethan stage folk has doubtless been garnered by the almost 
countless scholars who, during more than a century and a half 
of labor, have been diligently searching in the field. It is my 
hope that the present effort to collect and organize all the dis- 
covered facts — now scattered in widely separated places — will 
be of use to those who seriously concern themselves with the 
early drama of England. 

In order to facilitate reference, I have abbreviated the titles 
of the most frequently cited works. As a rule, these abbrevia- 
tions will be clear to students familiar with dramatic literature, 
or easily understood by a glance at the Bibliography; those 
which might occasion difficulty are listed below. 

Cohn (Shakesfeare in Germany) 

Collier (History of English Dramatic Poetry~) 

Elix.. Stage (Chambers, The Elizabethan Stage) 

H. D. (Greg, Henslowe's Diary) 

H.P. (Greg, Henslowe Papers) 

M.S.C. (Malone Society Collections) 

Murray (English Dramatic Companies) 



/oa C ^ ^' 



PREFACE 

N.U.S. (Nebraska University Studies^ 

K.E.S. (Keview of English Studies^ 

S.P.D. (Calendar of State Papers, Domestic) 

Warner (Dulwich Catalogue) 

I desire here to express my thanks to Mr. C. K. Edmonds, of 
the Huntington Library, who kindly transcribed for me various 
items from books not otherwise available. 

My greatest debt of gratitude, however, I owe to Professor 
Joseph Quincy Adams, who originally suggested to me this 
task, who at the outset turned over to me his own extensive 
collection of notes, and who with sympathetic interest and ever- 
ready aid encouraged me when the way seemed long and dark. 

I have tried hard to attain accuracy; yet the sheer multitude 
of details, and the inescapable errors that attend the mechanical 
operations of typing and printing, have, I know, at times de- 
feated my effort. For such mistakes I crave the kindly tolerance 
of the reader. 

Edwin Nungezer 

Norman, Oklahoma 

August II, 1918 



VI 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ABYNGDON, HENRY. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1455-78 (Wallace, Evolution, pp. 
XL ff.). 

ADAMS, JOHN. 

As one of Sussex's (Chamberlain's) company, John Adams re- 
ceived payment for the play given at Court on February l, 1576 
(Steele, p. 58). In 1583 he was a member of the Queen's troupe in 
London, for he is named in a City record that gives the personnel 
of the company at this time (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 106). Again in 1588 
he is mentioned in a document concerning the Queen's players for 
the non-payment of 8j-. /\d. subsidy (M.S.C. i. 354). He is referred 
to as a comic actor with Tarlton by the stage-keeper in Bartholo- 
mew Fair (Induction): "I kept the Stage in Master Tarletons time, 
I thanke my starres. Ho! and that man had liu'd to haue play'd 
in Bartholomew Fayre, you should ha' scene him ha' come in, and 
ha' beene coozened i' the Cloath-quarter, so finely! And Adams, 
the Rogue, ha' leap'd and caper'd vpon him, and ha' dealt his 
vermine about, as though they had cost him nothing." Adams 
probably survived Tarlton, who died in 1588. He may have 
played the clown in A Looking-Glass for London and England (not 
later than 1590), since the clown is sometimes called Adam 
(Greene, Plays, i. 193). He may also have played in James IV 
(c. 1 591), for Adam, evidently an actor, is mentioned in the part 
of Oberon (Ibid., ii. 153). The two plays seem to have been acted 
by the same company, probably the Queen's men (Greg, H.D. 
ii. 153). 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ADKINSON, WILL. 

Apparently an actor or stage-attendant mentioned in a stage- 
direction of Beaumont and Fletcher's A King and no King (quarto 
16x5, as "Acted at the Blacke-Fryars, by his Majestie Servants"): 
"Enter Servant, Will. Adkinson" (Works, i. 430). 

ADSON, F. 

Apparently an actor or stage-attendant mentioned in Hey- 
wood's The Late Lancashire Witches ("lately Acted at the Globe on 
the Banke-side, by the Kings Majesties Actors"; printed 1634): 
"Enter an invisible spirit. F. Adson with a brace of greyhounds" 
(Works, iv. 196). 

ALBERGHINL 

See Angelica Martineili (?). 

ALDERSON, WILLIAM. 

A member of the Chapel Royal, 1509-13 (Brewer, L. <& P. 
Henry VIII, i. i. pp. 15, 41, 461, 481; ii. 2.. pp. 1448, 1453, 1463; 
Chambers, Eliz,. Stage, ii. tjn.^. 

ALKOK, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, 
Child Actors, p. no). 

ALLEN, JEREMY. 

Jeremy Allen and Leonard Smith were at Coventry on August 
19, 1640, as members of an unnamed company of players. They 
received a payment of %os. under date of November 15, 1640 
(Murray, ii. Z54). 

ALLEN, JOHN. 

John Allen, a player, evidently distinct from John Alleyn 
(q-v.^ or his son John, is recorded in the registers of St. Botolph's, 
Bishopsgate (Eli^.. Stage, ii. i99). The parish registers note the 
baptism of a John Allen on October 17, 1570; the baptism of 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Lowin, son of John, on December 15, 1588; the burial of Joan on 
May 13, 1593; and the burial of John on May 18, 1593. Under 
date of July x6, 1596, we find the curious baptismal record: 
"Bennett, reputed daughter of Jno Allen, which Jno went with 
Sr Fr. Drake to the Indians in which time the child was got by a 
stage-player." Lastly, on October 18, 1597, "Jone uxor Johis 
Allen player was buried with a still born child." 

ALLEN, RICHARD. 

Richard Allen appears in the actor-list of Jonson's Epkoene, 
which, according to the folio of 161 6, was "Acted in the yeere 
1609, by the Children of her Maiesties Revells." The 1679 folio 
of Beaumont and Fletcher names Allen as one of the "principal 
actors" in The Coxcomb, which may have been acted by the Lady 
Elizabeth's men about 1613 (Eli^. Stage, ii. X5i). 

ALLEN, WILLIAM. 

William Allen was possibly with Queen Henrietta's men at the 
Cockpit in Drury Lane from their formation in 16x5 to their 
dissolution in 1637. At the breaking up of the company in 1637 
some of his fellows united with the Revels company at Salisbury 
Court and others joined Beeston's Boys at the Cockpit; but Allen 
is not known to have joined either of these troupes. By 1641 he 
was a King's man, his name appearing in a warrant of January 1.7. 
of that year (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). His name is appended 
to the dedicatory epistle of the 1647 folio of Beaumont and 
Fletcher's plays, published by a group of the King's players 
(Works, i. p. x). From Wright's Historia Histrionica (1699) we 
learn that he was among the "eminent actors" listed as "of 
principal note at the Cockpit," and that he joined the King's 
army and became "a major and quartermaster-general at Oxford" 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406, 409). He is known to have acted the 
following parts in plays presented by Queen Henrietta's com- 
pany (Murray, i. opp. 2.S€): Captain Lanby in Shirley's Wedding 
(c. 162.6); Pandolph in Davenport's King John and Matilda (c. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

162.9); Grimaldi, the Renegado, in Massinger's Renegado (pr. 
1630); Mullisbeg, King of Fesse, in Heywood's Fair Maid of the 
West, Part I (c. 1630); and Hannibal, in Nabbes's Hannibal and 
Scipio (1635). 

ALLEYN, EDWARD. 

Edward Alleyn was born on September i, 1566, the son of 
Edward Alleyn of Willen, Bucks, and Margaret Townley of Lan- 
caster, and his baptism on the following day is recorded in the 
parish register of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate. His father, in 1555, 
is styled "of London, yeoman"; in 1566, when he purchased a 
house in Bishopsgate, he appears as "innholder," and he is so de- 
scribed in hiswill, dated September 10, 1570; in a document of 1567 
he is named as "one of the Queens Maiesties porters." Edward 
Alleyn, the actor, is said to have been"bred a Stage-player' ' (Fuller, 
Worthies, edit. 1811, ii. 84), and we find him as a member of the 
Earl of Worcester's players in January, 1583, when he was six- 
teen years of age. The date at which he left Worcester's patronage 
and became a servant to the Lord Admiral is uncertain; but his 
elder brother, John, in 1589, is described as "servaunte to me the 
Lo. Admyrall," and with him during 1589-91 Edward was 
associated in the purchase of theatrical apparel. In the deeds 
relating to the property in Bishopsgate he is referred to as "yeo- 
man" and "gentleman," and once, in 1595, as "musicion." For 
a time there was an amalgamation of the troupes under the 
patronage of Lord Strange and the Lord Admiral; and, on Feb- 
ruary 19, 1591, when Strange's men occupied the Rose under the 
management of Henslowe, Edward Alleyn was the leading actor, 
although he kept his personal status as the Lord Admiral's 
servant. The coming of Lord Strange's men to the Rose led to a 
close friendship between Henslowe and Alleyn, which was 
strengthened by Alleyn's marriage, on October iz, 159^, to 
Henslowe's stepdaughter, Joan Woodward. The common inter- 
ests of the two men led to the formation of a business partnership 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

which soon became the most important single force in the 
theatrical life of the time. Joan Woodward may have been Alleyn's 
second wife, for in an undated letter to Alleyn from Richard Jones, 
which is generally assigned to February, i59x, there is mention of 
"mistris Allenes"; and this lends belief to the Dulwich tradition 
that Alleyn was thrice married. The playhouses were closed on 
account of the plague in February, 1593, and the company at the 
Rose was given permission to travel in the provinces. In the 
license granted by the Privy Council, May 6, 1593, Alleyn is 
specially designated as an Admiral's man, although the traveling 
company was under the patronage of Lord Strange. The letters 
that passed between Alleyn and his wife and his father-in-law 
during this tour give an intimate glimpse of their domestic 
affairs and bear pleasing testimony to Alleyn's amiable qualities 
and the affectionate terms upon which he lived with his "mouse" 
and her family. In one letter (Warner, p. 6) to his "good sweett 
mouse" Alleyn complains that she sends no news of her "domes- 
tycall matters," as how her "distilled watter proves of this or 
that or anything"; prays her to let his "orayng tawny stokins of 
wolen be dyed a very good blak" for the winter, and to remember 
to sow the bed which was parsley with "spinage" in September, 
since he will not be home till All Hallows. Alleyn, then twenty- 
six years of age, was at the height of his fame as an actor, and 
had been referred to in terms of highest eulogy by Nashe in 
Pierce Penilesse (i59x): "Not Roscius nor Aesop, those admyred 
tragedians that haue lined euer since before Christ was borne, 
could euer performe more in action than famous Ned Allen" 
(Works, i. 115). The popularity he had won is shown in Nashe's 
Strange Newes (1592.): "his very name (as the name of Ned Allen 
on the common stage) was able to make an ill matter good" 
(Works, i. 2.96). In 1594-97, as may be gathered from Henslowe's 
Diary, he was again acting at the Rose; but, towards the close of 
the latter year, he for some reason "leafte playinge," and for a 
time retired to the home of a friend in Sussex. In 1600 he built the 

5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Fortune, and about the beginning of December of that year he 
returned to the stage as leader of the Admiral's company at this 
new playhouse. An undated letter (H.P., p. 3x) from W. P. to 
Alleyn refers to a theatrical wager that the great tragedian would 
equal Bentley or Knell in any of their own parts. The admirer 
writes: "If you excell them, you will then be famous; if equall 
them, you wynne both the wager and credit; yf short of them, 
we must and will sale Ned Allen still." About Christmas, 1603, 
the Admiral's men were taken into the service of Prince Henry; 
and on March 15, 1604, Alleyn appeared, as "seruant to the 
young Prince," in the magnificent entertainment presented to 
King James upon his triumphant passage through London 
(Dekker, Works, i. i8o). Alleyn represented "Genius," and "his 
gratulatory speach was deliuered with excellent Action, and a 
well tun'de audible voyce." He probably soon retired from the 
stage, for his name does not appear in the patent issued to the 
Prince's troupe on April 30, 1606; but it is highly probable that 
he continued for a while to take part in the management of the 
Fortune. His business partnerships were varied, for, as early as 
1594, he had been interested in the Bear Garden; and, in 1604, he 
and Henslowe received a joint-patent as Masters of the Royal 
Game of Bears, Bulls, and Mastiff Dogs. In 1613 the Bear Garden 
was displaced by the Hope playhouse; and upon Henslowe's death 
in January, 1616, his interest passed to his son-in-law. Alleyn's 
fame as an actor and his investments in theatrical affairs had 
brought him wealth, which was constantly growing; and his 
negotiations for the purchase of the manor of Dulwich probably 
began in 1605. He seems to have left Southwark and settled on 
his country estate in 1613, the same year in which he began the 
building of a school and hospital by the name of the College of 
God's Gift at Dulwich. The total cost of the property was about 
£10,000; the endowment of the college included real estate in 
London and the freehold of the Fortune; and Alleyn spent upon 
the college and his own household approximately £1,700 a year. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

The corporate existence of the college dates from September 13, 
1 619, when Alleyn publicly read the Deed of Foundation in the 
chapel before a distinguished company, afterwards entertained at 
a dinner at which Francis Bacon was the guest of honor. Alleyn's 
diary for i6i7-zz and his correspondence are preserved at Dul- 
wich, and these give abundant evidence of his hospitality, 
patronage, and benevolence. He was host to distinguished liter- 
ary friends; members of the Fortune troupe and other actors were 
often his guests; and on special occasions he entertained the poor 
people of the college. His trips to London were frequent; he 
visited the Red Bull, the Rose, and the Fortune; and a letter 
(Birch, Courf and Times of James I, ii. 403) dated June 5, 1613, 
states that he rode "towards Winchester and Southampton, to 
take order for his majesty's entertainment with the prince and 
Lady Mary." His wife, Joan, died on June x8, 16x3, and on 
December 3 he married Constance, daughter of John Donne, Dean 
of St. Paul's, settling on her £1,500. In a letter (Birch, ii. 441) 
from John Chamberlain to Sir Dudley Carleton we have a sample 
of contemporary gossip: "But the strangest match in mine 
opinion is, that Allen the player hath lately married a young 
daughter of the Dean of Paul's; which, I doubt, will diminish 
his charity and devotion towards his two hospitals." The 
marriage did not have the effect anticipated, and Alleyn's good 
work was interrupted only by his death on November X5, i6x6. 
His will (Warner, p. xxxv) gives his wish, "without any vain 
funeral pomp or show, to be interred in the quire of that chapel 
which God of his goodness hath caused me to erect and dedicate 
to the honor of my Saviour by the name of Christs Chappell in 
Gods Gift College." 

Something remains to be said about Alleyn's chief roles and 
his histrionic fame as witnessed in the writings of his and 
later time. Of his excellence as an actor we have much testimony, 
but no detailed description of his method and no list of his parts. 
It is clear, however, that he was of fine physique, was best in 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

majestic characterizations, and that his impersonations gave a 
new meaning to the art of tragic acting. Of his many parts, the 
following are recorded: The title-role in Tamburlaine the Great 
(Marlowe, Works, ii. 6); probably King Edgar, in A Knack to 
Know a Knave, for the title-page carries the inscription: "as it 
hath sundrie tymes bene played by Ed: Allen and his Companie" 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, vi. 504); according to Heywood's Prologue to 
The Jew of Malta (1633), Barabas had been (originally?) played 
by Alleyn: 

And he [Barabas] , then by the best of actors [marginal 
note, "Allin"] played; 

in Tamburlaine, 

This Jew, with others many, th' other wan 
The attribute of peerless, being a man 
Whom we may rank with (doing no one wrong) 
Proteus for shapes, and Roscius for a tongue, 
So could he speak, so vary; 

and in his dedication of the play, Heywood writes: "the part of 
the Jew presented by so unimitable an actor as Mr. Alleyn" 
(Marlowe, Works, ii. 4, 6); probably the title-role of Orlando in 
Robert Greene's Orlando Furioso, for a manuscript actor's-part of 
this role, with corrections by Alleyn himself, is preserved at 
Dulwich (H.P., p. 155); Cutlack, in a non-extant play by that 
title (E. Guilpin, Works, p. 18, Skialetheia, Epigram 43): 

Clodus me thinks lookes passing big of late, 
With Dunstons browes, and Aliens Cutlacks gate; 

Faustus, in Doctor Faustus (S. Rowlands, Works, ii. Knave of 
Clubs, p. 2.9): 

The Gull gets on a surplis, 
With a crosse vpon his breast. 
Like Allen playing Faustus, 
In that manner he was drest; 

Sebastian, in Frederick and Basilea; Muly Mahamet, in The Battle 
of Alcazar; and Tamar Cam, in i Tamar Cam (H.F., pp. 153, 154). 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Of his dramatic skill and his philanthropy we have testimonies 
as follow: An epigram by John Weever QEpigrammes, iv. 2.3): 

In Ed: Allen 

Rome had her Roscius and her Theater, 

Her Terence, Plautus, Ennius and M-eander, 

The first to Allen, Phoebus did transfer 

The next, Thames Swans receiu'd fore he coulde land her. 

Of both more worthy we by Phoebus doome, 

Then t' Allen Roscius yeeld, to London Rome. 

An epigram by Ben Jonson (Works, viii. 191): 

To Edward Allen 

If Rome so great, and in her wisest age, 
Fear'd not to boast the glories of her stage, 
As skilful Roscius, and grave ^sop, men, 
Yet crown 'd with honours, as with riches, then: 
Who had no less a trumpet of their name. 
Than Cicero, whose every breath was fame: 
How can so great example die in me. 
That, Allen, I should pause to publish thee? 
Who both their graces in thy self hast more 
Out-stript, than they did all that went before: 
And present worth in all dost so contract, 
As others speak, but only thou dost act. 
Wear this renown. 'Tis just, that who did give 
So many poets life, by one should live. 

Heywood (Apology, p. 43): "Among so many dead, let me not 
forget one yet alive, in his time the most worthy, famous Maister 
Edward Allen." An epigram by Thomas Campion (Works, edit. 
1889, P- 2-79): 

In Ligonem 

Invideat quamvis sua verba Latina Britannis 
Causidicis, docto nunc Ligo fertur equo. 
Et medici partes agit undique notus; Alenum 
Scenarum melius vix puto posse decus. 

9 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

A poem by Sir William Alexander, Earl of Stirling (Works, ii.340): 

To his deservedly honored friend, M.r. Edward Allane, the first 

founder and master of the CoUeige of Gods Gift 

Some greate by bulk or chance, whom fortune blindes, 
Where (if it were) trew virtue wold burst forth, 
They sense not haveing, can afford no worth, 
And by their meanes doe but condemne their myndes. 
To honour such I should disgrace my penne, 
Who might prove more, I count them lesse then men. 

But thee to praise I dare be bould indeede, 
By fortunes strictnesse whilst at first suppress'd. 
Who at the height of that which thou profess'd 
Both ancients, moderns, all didst far exceede: 

Thus vertue many ways may use hir pow'r — 

The bees draw honnie out of evrie flow'r. 

And when thy state was to a better chang'd. 

That thou enabled wast for doing goode. 

To clothe the naked, give the hungrie foode, 

As one that was for avarice estrang'd : 

Then what was fill thou scorn'd to seeke for more, 
Whilst bent to doe what was design'd before. 

Then prosecute this noble course of thyne. 
As prince or priest for state, in charge though none. 
For acting this brave part, when thou art gone, 
Thy fame more bright then somes' more high shall shyne. 
Since thou turn'd great, who this worlds stage doe trace. 
With whom it seems thou hast exchang'd thy place. 

Baker, Theatrum Redivivum (i66x), pp. 34, 48: "And what scurril- 
ity was ever heard to come from the best Actours of our Time, 
Allen, and Bourbidge? yet, what Plays were ever so pleasing, as 
where their Parts had the greatest part^ . . . And lest he 
[Prynne] should say, that the Schoole of Plays is degenerated and 
grown worse, have we not seen in our time, a famous Scholer 
come out of this Schole: Edward Allen a Player himself: Famous 
as well for his Honesty as for his Acting: and who hath left be- 
hind him a worthy Testimony of his Christian Charity to all 

10 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Posterity" (Notes and Queries, 1880, i. 113). Fuller, Worthies 
(edit. 1811), ii. 84: "He was the Roscius of our age, so acting to 
the life, that he made any part (especially a majestick one) to 
become him." Baker, Chronicle (edit. 1674), P- 5°°' "Richard 
Bourbidge and Edward Allen, two such Actors as no age must 
ever look to see the like." Wright, Historia Histrionica (1699} 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 407): 

Lovewit. ... I have read of one Edward Alleyn, a man so 
famed for excellent action, that among Ben Jonson's epigrams I 
find one directed to him, full of encomium, and concluding thus — 

Wear this renown; 'tis just that who did give 

So many poets life, by one should live. 

Was he one of the Blackfriars? 

Trueman. Never as I have heard (for he was dead before my 
time). He was master of a company of his own, for whom he 
built the Fortune Playhouse from the ground, a large round brick 
building. This is he that grew so rich, that he purchased a great 
estate in Surrey and elsewhere; and having no issue, he built and 
largely endowed Dulwich College in the year 1619, for a master, 
a warden, four fellows, twelve aged poor people, and twelve 
poor boys, &c. A noble charity! 

For more detailed biographical sketches, see G. F. Warner, 
Catalogue of the Manuscripts and Muniments of Alleyn s College of 
God's Gift at Dulwich (1881); W. Young, History of Dulwich 
College, with a Life of the Founder, Edivard Alleyn, and an Accurate 
Transcript of his Diary, 16 17- 1622 (1889), vol. ii; and W. W. Greg, 
Henslowe's Diary (1908), vol. ii. 

ALLEYN, JOHN. 

John Alleyn, elder brother of the famous Edward, was born 
about 1556-57. He succeeded his father as innholder, and was, if 
not actually a performer, at least closely engaged in theatrical 
affairs. In 1580 he is styled "inholder" and servant to "the Lord 
ShefFeilde" (Warner, p. 1x3), and as "servaunte to me the Lo. 
Admyrall" in a letter on his behalf, dated July 14, 1589, from the 

.11 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Privy Council to certain Aldermen (Warner, p. 85). In a deed of 
sale, of January 3, 1589, he is described with Edward Alleyn and 
Robert Browne as part-owner of "playinge apparelles, playe- 
Bookes, Instrumentes and other commodities," and from this 
time to May 6, 1591, we find him on several occasions associated 
with his brother in the purchase of similar properties (Warner, 
pp. 3, 4). During 1590 he was connected with the Admiral's men at 
the Theatre, and in November of that year went to the playhouse 
to have a settlement with Burbage for money due to him and his 
fellows (Wallace, N.U.S., xiii. loi). When he testified. May 6, 
1592., in the Brayne-Burbage controversy, he is referred to as 
"late of the parishe of St Buttollphes without Bishops gate 
London ffree of the company of the Inholders of london of the 
age of XXXV yeres or theraboutes" (Wallace, ibid., p. 114), which 
is our authority for the approximate date of his birth. He died 
about the first of May, 1596, for on May 5 Letters of Administra- 
tion were granted to Margaret Allen on the "goods of John 
Allen, her husband, late of the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn, 
deceased intestate" (Warner, p. X55). He had owned real estate 
in the parish of St. Saviour's, Southwark, for in June, 1618, 
"the Unicorn and other messuages, . . . late in the tenure of 
John Allen and others," were in dispute between the Attorney- 
General on the one part and William Henslowe and Jacob Meade 
on the other part (Warner, p. ^69). Besides his widow, Alleyn 
left a son, John, who on May 19, 1613, witnessed an acquittance 
from Robert Daborne to Philip Henslowe (Warner, p. 41); and 
about 1 61 8 he appears in connection with some bear-baiting 
transactions in which his uncle, Edward Alleyn, was concerned 
(Warner, p. 340). There is preserved among the manuscripts at 
Dulwich an undated letter from him asking a Mr. Burne for his 
"datter in marriage." His suit, however, was apparently un- 
successful, for an affidavit of Edward, son of Thomas Allen, 
June 6, 1 641, declares him to have died "without issue and un- 
married" (Warner, pp. 87, 149). 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ALLEYN, RICHARD. 

Richard Alley n, apparently no kinsman of Edward, appears on 
May 8, 1594, as a witness to a loan by Philip Henslowe to his 
nephew, Francis Henslowe, "to laye downe for his share to the 
Quenes players," and may therefore have been a member of 
the same company (H.D., i. 4; ii. 80). He was doubtless an 
Admiral's man from 1597 to his death in November, 1601. In 
1597-98 he borrowed from Henslowe various small sums, in- 
cluding payments to the attorney Ceachen. On March X5, 1598, he 
bound himself to Henslowe for two years "as a hiered servante," 
and witnessed a similar agreement between Heywood and Hens- 
lowe (H.D., i. zoi, i04, 2.05). In the original performance of 
Frederick and Bus ilea by the Admiral's company on June 3, 1597, 
he appeared as the Prologue, as Frederick, and as the Epilogue. 
In the revival of The Battle of Alcazar by the same company, 
probably about 1600-01, he assumed the parts of the Presenter, a 
Portuguese, and Diego Lopis (H.P., p. 153; Eli^,. Stage, ii. 175). 
On April 7, 1599, Henslowe advanced ioj. to him and Towne "to 
go to the corte vpon ester euen" (H.D., i. 104). Alleyn author- 
ized payments on behalf of the Admiral's men on January 17 (?), 
1599, and May 6, 1600 (H.D., i. loi, izi). His daughters, Anna 
and Elizabeth, were baptized at St. Saviour's, Southwark, on 
May 13, 1599, and May 17, 1601, respectively. He is traceable in 
the token-books of St. Saviour's parish during 1 538-1601, and 
was there buried on November 18, 1601, leaving a widow (Eli^. 
Stage, ii. 199). 

ALLEYN'S BOY. 

" Alleyn 's boy" appeared as a page in The Battle of Alcazar, 
acted by the Admiral's men about 1600-01 (H.P., p. 153; Eli^,. 
Stage, ii. 175-76). 

ALLINGHAM, JOHN. 

John Allingham is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January li, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 

13 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

ANDREWE, HENRY. 

A member of the Chapel Royal, 1509 and 151 1 (Brewer, L. & P. 
Henry VIII, i. i. pp. 15, 41; Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. 2.44; 
Chambers, Elix.. Stage, ii. iyw.). 

ANDREWES, RICHARD. 

On March 6, 1584, the Earl of Worcester's players were en- 
gaged in a dispute with the authorities at Leicester. In the ac- 
count of the quarrel there is an abstract of the license issued by 
the Earl of Worcester to his company, dated January 14, 1583, 
and listing Richard Andrewes as a member of the company (Eliz.. 
Stage, ii. xzx). 

ANDROWES, GEORGE. 

George Androwes owned one share in the syndicate that in 
1608 leased the Whitefriars playhouse (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 

313-15)- 

APILEUTTER, CHRISTOPHER. 

In June and July, 161 5, Christopher Apileutter visited Strass- 
burg, Germany, with John Spencer (Herz, p. 50). He may have 
been the "Germanian" or the "Dutchman" mentioned with 
Spencer's troupe at Cologne in February, 161 5. Since we hear no 
more of him, he may possibly be identified with the "Germanian," 
who "dies as a good Catholic" (Cohn, p. xci). 

APPERLEY, JOHN. 

The registers of St. Saviour's, Southwark, record the baptism 
of children of John Apperley (Atterley, Aperley), a musician : 
John, March 18, 1613; William, March iz, 1618; Margaret, March 
9, 1610 (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 1918, p. 856). 

14 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ARCHER, RICHARD. 

Richard Archer visited Hastings on March 2.5, 1603, as a 
member of a licensed troupe of four "common players of inter- 
ludes" (cf. John Arkinstall). 

ARCHER, ROBERT. 
See Robert Arzschar. 

ARKINSTALL, JOHN. 

In a record of the town of Lewes, dated March 30, 1603, John 
Arkinstall is described as ' 'of Ringy in the Parish of Bowden in 
the County of Chester, trumpeter." With Richard Archer, 
Barker, and Anthony Ward as his fellows, he formed a licensed 
troupe of "commion players of interludes." On March 15, 1603, 
the company, while lodging at a tavern in Hastings, Sussex, 
heard that the Earl of Southampton had proclaimed Lord Beau- 
champ as king of England, and on March 30 Arkinstall reported 
this information to the constables at Lewes (Hist. MSS. Comm., 
xiii. 4. p. 1x6). 

ARMIGER, EDWARD. 

Under license of November 10, 16x9, Edward Armiger is 
named as a member of the Red Bull company that appeared at 
Reading on November 30 of the same year (Murray, ii. 386). 
His burial is recorded in the registers of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, 
on September 30, 1635 (Malcolm, Londinium Redivivum, iii. 304). 

ARMIN, ROBERT. 

Robert Armin, son of John Armin "of Lynn in the county of 
Norff. taylor," was apprenticed to John Lowyson, London 
goldsmith, on October 13, 1581 (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli, 96). 
This confirms the tradition in Tarlton's Jests, "How Tarlton made 
Armin his adopted sonne to succeed him," that Armin began his 
career as apprentice to a goldsmith in Lombard Street QJest- 
Books, ed. Hazlitt, ii. zi6): 

15 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Tarlton keeping a taverne in Gracious street, hee let it to an- 
other, who was indebted to Armin's master, a goldsmith in 
Lombard street, yet he himselfe had a chamber in the same house; 
and this Armin, being then a wag, came often thither to demand 
his masters money, which he sometimes had, and sometimes had 
not. In the end the man, growing poore, told the boy hee had no 
money for his master, and hee must beare with him. The man's 
name being Charles, Armin made this verse, writing it with 
chalke on a wainescot: 

O world, why wilt thou lye? 

Is this Charles the great? that I deny. 

Indeed Charles the great before. 

But now Charles the lesse, being poore. 

Tarlton, coming into the roome, reading it, and partly acquainted 
with the boyes humour, comming often thither for his master's 
money, tooke a piece of chalk, and wrote this rhyme by it: 

A wagge thou art, none can prevent thee; 

And thy desert shall content thee. 

Let me divine. As I am. 

So in time thou'lt be the same. 

My adopted sonne therefore be. 

To enjoy my clownes sute after me. 

And see how it fell out. The boy, reading this, so loved Tarlton 
after that, regarding him with more respect, hee used to his 
playes, and fell in a league with his humour: and private practise 
brought him to present playing, and at this houre performes the 
same where, at the Globe on the Banks side, men may see him. 

The earliest extant edition of Tarlton s Jests is that of 1611, but 
the Second Part, here quoted, was entered in the Stationers' 
Registers on August 4, 1600 (Arber, iii. 168). 

We do not know how long Armin received encouragement 
from Tarlton, who died in September, 1588. Apparently Armin's 
earliest reputation was made not as a comedian but as a writer. 
When in 1590 he contributed a preface to A Brief Resolution of the 
Right Religion he seems already to have gained some distinction 
as an author. In Nashe's Strange Newes of i59X (Works, i. i8o) he 
is referred to as a "son of Elderton," a popular ballad-writer of 

16 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the time; and in Harvey's Pierces Supererogation of 1593 (Works, n. 
x8o) he is introduced with Thomas Deloney and Philip Stubbes 
under the title, "the common Pamfletters of London." He may 
have been the R.A. who wrote verses to Robert Tofte's Alba 
(1598), but is not the R.A. (Robert Allot) who compiled Eng- 
land's Parnassus (1600). The first dramatic organization with 
which Armin was associated seems to have been Lord Chandos's 
men; it is impossible, however, to say when he joined this com- 
pany. He writes in a dedicatory epistle to Mary, widow of 
William Brydges (Lord Chandos, i594-i6ox), prefixed to his 
kinsman Gilbert Dugdale's True Discourse of the Practises of Eliza- 
beth Caldwell (1604): "Your good honor knowes Pinck's poor 
heart, who, in all my services to your late deceased kind lord, 
never savoured of flatterie or fixion." That Armin 's service to 
Lord Chandos had been as a player, there can be little doubt, for 
in his Foole Vpon Foole or Sixe Sortes of Sottes (1605), "Shewing 
their lives, humours, and behauiours, with their want of witte 
in their shew of wisedome" QA^orks, p. xy), he tells how Jack 
Miller of Esam (Evesham) crossed the Severn on thin ice to see 
again his favorite clown "Grumball" w^ith "the Lord Shandoyes 
Players" at Partiar (Pershore in Worcestershire). Armin wit- 
nessed the incident, and not improbably played the part of 
"Grumball." Foole Vpon Foole or Sixe Sortes of Sottes, a collection 
of tales respecting persons of the Jack Miller type, was issued 
anonymously in 1600, the author describing himself as "Clonnico 
de Curtanio Snuffe," meaning that he was the clown at the 
Curtain (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 3x1). From this we 
gather that by 1599 Armin had probably joined the Chamber- 
lain's men at the Curtain. A second edition appeared in 1605, as 
the work of "Clonnico del Mondo Snuffe," in other words, the 
clown at the Globe. A third and enlarged edition was published 
in 1608 as A Nest of Ninnies, with Armin 's name on the title-page, 
dedicated to the "generous Gentlemen of Oxenford, Cambridge, 
and the Innes of Court," 

17 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

And praying euer that your Sunnie shine 
May beautifie our globe in euery line, 

which gives a pun on the name of the playhouse at which Armin 
was then an actor (Works, ed. Grosart, p. 45). "Clunnyco de 
Curtaneo Snuffe" is also on the title-page oi Quips upon Questions 
(1600), which must therefore be by Armin, although attributed 
to John Singer (Collier, Bibl. Ace, iii. X55) because of "a MS. 
note on the first leaf." In keeping with a theatrical custom of the 
time, which allowed the spectators to fling upon the stage, or to 
suggest verbally, various "themes" to which the clown would 
reply in extempore verse, the author supposes diverse questions 
propounded to him, followed by his replies, and closed by what 
he terms a "Quip" or a satirical observation, a moral, or a re- 
flection upon both question and answer (Collier, Bibl. Ace, iii. 
157). Armin is named as a King's man in the license of May 19, 
1603, and in the procession list of March 15, 1604. In 1605 Augus- 
tine Phillips left him ros. as his "fellowe." He is in the actor- 
lists of Jonson's Alchemist (1610) and of Shakespeare's plays in 
the folio of 16x3. The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate record 
the baptism of Armin's daughter, Elizanna, May 11, 1603, and 
the burial of two children, a daughter, who seems to have died 
before she was christened, October 11, 1600, and a son, Robert, 
April 4, 1606 (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 95). On the title-page 
of his History of the Two Maids of More-clacke (1609), played by 
the Children of the King's Revels, he is described as a King's 
man. The crude woodcut which adorns this title-page may be a 
portrait of Armin in his fool's costume — a long coat, worn by 
the natural whom he impersonated. In the preface "To the 
friendly peruser," Armin writes: "I would haue againe inacted 
lohn my selfe, but Tempora mutantur in illis, & I cannot do as I 
would," which has been taken to mean that in 1609 Armin was 
"poor and infirm" (Works, ed. Grosart, p. viii), and from which 
we learn that he had originally acted the part of John in the 
play. He may have retired from the stage about this time, for 

18 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

his name does not occur in the actor-list of Jonson's Catiline 
(1611). Armin's Phantasma, the Italian Tailor and his Boy was 
published in 1609. On the title-page, and also in the entry in the 
Stationers' Registers, February 6, 1609 (Arber, iii. 401), he is 
noted as a King's man. The Phantasma is an adaptation in verse 
from Straparola's Piacevoli Notti, Night viii. Fable 5. With an 
apology that "Fooles makes Bookes for Wise men to laugh at," 
Armin dedicated his versified story to Lord and Lady Hadding- 
ton. The dedication is interesting for the author's claim to have 
been ' Vrit downe for an Asse in his time, ' ' and for the reference 
to "his Constableship" (Works, p. 141), from which it is inferred 
that he had succeeded Kempe in the part of Dogberry in Much 
Ado about Nothing. He also asks the Lady to pardon "the boldness 
of a Begger," which may be merely a pun on his name, since 
"armin" means "a beggar" (Nares, i. 33). The Valiant Welshman 
was published in 1615 as "Written by R. A. Gent." The "R. A. 
Gent" has been associated with Robert Armin, "but without 
corroborative evidence supporting this reading of the initials" 
(J. S. Farmer's note in the Tudor Facsimile edition). Fleay (Life 
of Shak., p. 300) finds a pun on "armine" (a beggar) in London 
Prodigall (c. 1603), V. i. 174, and suggests that Armin played 
Matthew Flowerdale: 

Luce. O here, God, so young an armine. 

Flowerdale. Armine, sweet-heart? I know not what you 
meane by that, but I am almost a beggar. 

The clown in Wilkins's Miseries of Enforced Marriage (c. 1605) is 
addressed as Robin, possibly Armin (Hazlitt's Dodsley, ix. 498). 
In Dekker's If It be not Good, the Devil is in It (i6io-ii), acted by 
Queen Anne's men at the Red Bull, the clown Lurchall is some- 
times addressed as Grumball (Works, iii. pp. i68, 2.70), and there 
is an allusion (Ibid., p. Z9o) to A Nest of Ninnies, "If Ninies bring 
away the Nest"; but so far as known Armin never belonged to 
Queen Anne's men at the Red Bull. The register of St. Bodolph 

19 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Aldgate records on November 30, 1615, the burial of Armin, 
describing him as "fFree of the Gouldsmithes, and a Player" 
(Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 95). 

In the section headed "To Worthy Persons," John Davies of 
Hereford in his Scourge of Folly (Stationers' Registers, October 8, 
1 610; Arber, iii. 446) prints the following epigram (Works, ii. 60): 

To hone St- game some Robin Armin, 

That tickles the spleene like an harmeles vermin. 

Armine, what shall I say of thee, but this. 

Thou art a foole and knaue? Both? fie, I misse; 

And wrong thee much, sith thou in deede art neither. 

Although in shew, thou playest both together. 

Wee all (that's kings and all) but players are 

Vpon this earthly stage; and should haue care 

To play our parts so properly, that wee 

May at the end gaine an applauditee. 

But most men ouer-act, misse-act, or misse 

The action which to them peculier is; 

And the more high the part is which they play, 

The more they misse in what they do or say. 

So that when off the stage, by death, they wend, 

Men rather hisse at them then them commend. 

But (honest Robin) thou with harmelesse mirth 

Dost please the world; and (so) amongst the earth 

That others but possesse with care, that stings; 

So makst thy life more happy farre then kings. 

And so much more our loue should thee imbrace, 

Sith still thou liu'st with some that dye to grace. 

And yet art honest (in despight of lets). 

Which earnes more praise then forced goodnesse gets. 

So, play thy part, be honest still with mirth; 

Then when th' art in the tyring-house of earth, 

Thou being his seruant whome all kings do serue, 

Maist for thy part well playd like praise deserue; 

For in that tyring-house when either bee, 

Y' are one mans men and equall in degree. 

So thou, in sport, the happiest men dost schoole — 

To do as thou dost, — wisely play the foole. 

xo 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ARTHUR, THOMAS. 

The only known record of Thomas Arthur is found in the pro- 
ceedings of a lawsuit in I5i8-X9 between George Mayler, glazier 
and trainer of players to Henry VIII, and Thomas Arthur, tailor, 
whom Mayler took as an apprentice for a year, promising to 
teach him to play and to obtain for him admission into the 
King's company of interluders with the right to the privileges 
thereof and "the Kinges bage." According to Mayler, he fur- 
nished Arthur meat and drink and /\d. a day. Arthur served an 
apprenticeship of seven weeks in the "science of playing," and 
left without getting a license from Mayler. Nevertheless, Arthur, 
beguiling away three of his master's covenant servants, went to 
"sundry partiez of Englond in plainge of many interludes," from 
which tour they gained a profit of £30. Mayler complains that, 
according to the agreement, some of the income was his. He 
testifies that Arthur was "right harde and dull too taike any 
lernyng, wherby he was nothinge meate or apte too bee in service 
with the Kinges grace too maike any plaiez or interludes before 
his highness." Arthur, on the other hand, contended that Mayler 
had broken the contract, and thus sued him before the sheriffs 
of London for £z6 to cover the losses that he had undergone. 
Owing to the accident of Mayler's being in Ludgate prison and 
unable to defend himself, the jury placed upon him a penalty of 
£4, and he appealed to Chancery. The outcome is unknown. 
(See Overend, New Shak. Soc. Trans., 1877-79, P- 4^5-) 

ARZSCHAR, ROBERT. 

From 1608 to 161 6 Robert Arzschar, whose correct name was 
probably Archer, appears in German records as an English actor. 
He was at Frankfort in the autumn of 1608 and 1610, and in Sep- 
tember, 1 613, at the Reichstag held by the Kaiser at Regensburg. 
Early in 1614 he came into the service of John Sigismund, Elector 
of Brandenburg, whose company appeared as the "Brandenburg 
Comedians" at Wolffenbiittel in September, 1614, and at Danzig 

2.1 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in July, 1615. The Elector paid him a salary of 100 florins, be- 
sides board at the Court gratis and two suits. He was an Elector's 
man until May 16, 161 6, when he was dismissed with a sum of 
^50 thalers as settlement of his claims (Cohn, p. Ixxxviii; Herz, 

PP- 53 > 56)- 

ASHBORNE, EDWARD. 

Edward Ashborne is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December zy, 162.4, to twenty-one men "imployed 
by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

ASHTON. 

Apparently an actor or stage-attendant mentioned in stage- 
directions of Beaumont and Fletcher's Love's Pilgrimage (a revival 
by the King's men about 16x4-2.5?): "Enter two Servants, i 
Rowl: X Ashton," II. i; "Servant, Rowl: Ashton," IV. ii (Works ^ 
vi. 416, 417). 

ASKEN, AARON. 

Aaron Asken, "Aaron the Dancer," appears in Germany during 
16x7 and 1640 with Robert Reynolds's company of players. For 
some time between these dates he was in the service of the Polish 
king, Sigismund III (Herz, pp. 31,55 ff.). 

ATTERLEY,JOHN. 
See John Apperley. 

ATTEWELL, GEORGE. 

On behalf of what appears to have been the combined Strange- 
Admiral's company, George Attewell received payment for per- 
formances at Court on December 2.-j, 1590, and February 16, 15 91. 
On June i, 1595, he witnessed a loan from Philip to Francis 
Henslowe, and possibly belonged to the same company as the 

12. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

latter, which may have been the Queen's men. A "Mr. Otwell" 
lived in St. Saviour's Close in 1599 QEli^. Stage, ii. iio, 300; H.D., 
ii. 140; Steele, pp. 100, loi). 

ATTWELL, HUGH. 

Hugh Attwell appears in the actor-list of Jonson's Epkoene, 
which, according to the folio of 161 6, was "Acted in the yeere 
1609, by the Children of her Maiesties Revells." The 1679 folio 
of Beaumont and Fletcher names Attwell as one of the "principal 
actors" in The Coxcomb, which may have been presented by the 
Lady Elizabeth's men about 1613 (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 151). On April 
2.5, 1613, he witnessed a loan from Philip Henslowe to Robert 
Daborne (Warner, p. 39). By March zo, 1616, he had joined 
Prince Charles's troupe, for on that date, with other members of 
the company, he signed an agreement with Alleyn and Meade 
(H.P., p. 90). Early in 1619, as servant to the Prince, he appeared 
as New Year in Middleton's Masque of Heroes (Works, vii. ioo). 
At the time of his death on September 2.5, i6ii, he belonged to 
Prince Charles's men. William Rowley, a fellow-actor and member 
of the same company, wrote on him the following elegy and 
epitaph (Collier, i. 406): 

For a Funerall Elegie on the Death of Htigh Atwell, 
Servant to Prince Charles, this fellotv-feeling Farewell: 
who died the zph of Sept. 16 21. 

So, now Hee's downe, the other side may shout: 

But did he not play faire? held he not out 

With courage beyond his bone? full sixe yeares 

To wrastle and tugge with Death? the strong'st feares 

To meet at such a match. They that have seene 

How doubtfull Victorie hath stood betw^eene. 

Might wonder at it. Sometimes cunningly 

Death gets advantage: by his cheeke and eye 

We thought that ours had beene the weaker part, 

And straight agen the little mans great heart 

Would rouse fresh strength and shake him off awhile: 

Death would retire, but never reconcile. 

2-3 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

They too 't agen, agen; they pull, they tugge, 

At last Death gets within, and with a hugge 

The faint Soule crushes. This thou maist boast. Death, 

Th' hast throwne him faire, but he was out of breath. 

Refresh thee then (sweet Hugh); on the ground rest: 

The worst is past, and now thou hast the best. 

Rise with fresh breath, and be assur'd before. 

That Death shall never wrastle with thee more. 

Oh, hadst thou Death (as warres and battels may 

Present thee so) a field of noble clay 

To entertaine into thy rhewmie cell. 

And thou wouldst have it be presented well, 

Speake thy oration by this mans toung: 

Mongst living Princes it hath sweetly sung, 

(While they have sung his praise) but if thy Court 

Be silence-tyde and there dwells no report. 

Lend it to Life to store another flesh: 

We misse it here; wee'l entertain 't afresh. 

Epitaph 

Here lyes the man (and let no lyars tell) 
His heart a Saints, his toung a silver bell: 
Friend to his friend he stood: by Death he fell: 
He chang'd his Hugh, yet he remains At-well. 

Will. Rowley. 

Hugh Attwell may perhaps be identified with the author or 
singer or dancer of Mr. AttoweU's Jigge betweene Francis a Gentleman, 
Richard a Farmer, and their wives (A. Clark, Shirburn Ballads, p. 
2.44). There are four parts to the dramatic sketch, with a different 
tune for each scene. The first, "To the tune of Walsingham," 
represents the "iolly Palmer," Francis, making love to Besse, 
Richard's wife; she pretends compliance and arranges for an 
assignation. In the second, "Enter Richard, Bess'es husband. To 
the tune of the Jewishe dance." In scene three, "Enter Mistris 
Francis with Richard, To the tune of Buggle-boe"; and as a 
climax, Francis enters "with his owne wife (having a maske 
before her face) supposing her to be Besse, To the tune of Go 
from my windo." The jig is a lively little piece, rough in work- 

2-4 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

manship, and evidently depending for success on its rapid move- 
ment and the variety of its tunes. 

AUGUSTEN, WILLIAM. 

A player, from whom Philip Henslow^e bought his boy, James 
Bristow, for £8, December i8, 1597 (H.D., i. xo}). His daughter 
Penelope, was baptized at St. Bodolph's Aldgate on November 
19, 1595 (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 97). 

AXEN, ROBERT. 

Robert Axen was a member of Queen Henrietta's company 
from 1 63 1 to 1635. In Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, Parts I 
and II (printed 1631, as "lately acted ... by the Queen's 
Majesties comedians"), he played the parts of an English mer- 
chant and the Duke of Mantua, respectively. In Nabbes's Hanni- 
bal and Scipio ("Acted in the year 1635 by the Queenes Majesties 
Servants, at their Private house in Drurye Lane") he acted two 
parts, Bomilcar and Gisgon (Murray, i. opp. 2.G€). The registers 
of St. James, Clerkenwell, record the following children of 
Robert Axon, who may be identical with the player (Hovenden, 
i. 116, 12.-2., 17.6; iv. xoz, xo7): John, "kild with a cart," buried 
June 5, 1 631; Simon, baptized January 16 and buried January xi, 
1633; Everelda, daughter "of Robert Axon and Mary his wife," 
baptized February 6, 1631; and William, baptized March z8, 1634. 

AXON, ROBERT. 

See Robert Axen. 

AYNSWORTH, JOHN. 

The registers of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, record the burial of 
"John Aynsworth, a player," on September x8, 1581 (Stopes, 
Burbage, p. 139). 

BABHAM, CHRISTOPHER. 

Apparently Christopher Babham was in some way associated 
w^ith the King's men at Blackfriars, as suggested by an entry 

2-5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 



dated November ix, 1631 (A. Nicoll, Times Lit. Suppl., Nov. xx, 
19x3, p. 789): "A petition of William Blagrove & William 
Becston that his Lo would restore vnto them a boy named 
Stephen Hamerton inveigled from them by one Christopher 
Babham & by him imployed at the Blackfryars playhouse." 

BACKSTEAD, WILL. 

See William Barksted. 

BACKSTER, RICHARD. 
See Richard Baxter. 

BACON, JOB. 

Apparently an actor or stage-attendant mentioned in a stage- 
direction of Beaumont and Fletcher's Love's Pilgrimage (a revival 
by the King's men about 16X4-X5?): "Job. Bacon ready to shoot 
off a Pistol," IV. ii (Works, vi. 417). Since he had a minor part 
in the play, perhaps he may be identified with the John Bacon 
named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on January ix, 1636, to 
the attendants of the King's players at Blackfriars (Stopes, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). The "Job" could quite possibly be "Joh," 
an abbreviation for John. 

BACON, JOHN. 
See Job. Bacon. 

BADLOWE, RICHARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, 
Child Actors, p. iii). 

BAGSTARE, RICHARD. 

Richard Bagstare is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January ix, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 
servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stoics, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). He may possibly be identified 

x6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

with Richard Baxter Qq.v.'), who seems to have assumed minor 
parts in Beaumont and Fletcher's Mad Lover (c. 163 1) and Mas- 
singer's Believe as You List (c. 163 1). 

BAKER, HARRY. 

Apparently the performer of Vertumnus in Nashe's Summer's 
Last Will and Testament (Works, iii. x8x), acted in 1 59Z at Croydon, 
possibly by members of Archbishop Whitgift's household 
(Eliz.. Stage, iii. 451-53): 

Autumne. Now I beseech your honor it may be so. 

Summer. With all my heart: Vertumnus, go for them. 

[Exit Vertumnus. 

Wil. Summer. This same Harry Baker is such a necessary fellow 
to go on arrants, as you shall not finde in a country. It is a pitty 
but he should haue another siluer arrow, if it be but for crossing 
the stage with his cap on. [Lines 1565-70.] 

McKerrow (Nashe, iv. 440) suggests that possibly a jest on 
Harry Baker's name is intended in line 171 6: "they must bring 
bread with them, I am no Baker." 

BAKER, ROBERT. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, 
Child Actors, p. iii). 

BALLS. 

Balls is apparently the actor or stage-attendant who assumed 
the part of the Queen in Massinger's Believe as You List, as sug- 
gested by marginal annotations in the manuscript (ed. Croker, 
p. 49). The play was licensed for the King's men on May 7, 
163 1 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 33). 

BANASTER, GILBERT. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1478-84? (Wallace, Evolution, 
pp. X3 ff. ; Blackfriars, p. 6x). 

BAND, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Bond. 

2-7 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BANKES, WILLIAM. 

William Bankes's name appears in a warrant of December ii, 
1635, appointing certain members of Prince Charles's company 
as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 98). 

BARFIELD, ROGER. 

Of Roger Barfield's stage-career nothing more is known than 
the appearance of his name in a warrant to Queen Anne's men, 
March 7, 1606. His daughter Isabell was baptized at St. Giles's 
on January i, 1611, and his daughter Susan was buried there on 
July 3, 1614 (Eli'i. Stage, ii. X35, 301). 

BARKER. 

Barker is recorded at Hastings on March 15, 1603, as a member 
of a licensed troupe of four "common players of interludes" 
(cf. John Arkinstall). 

BARKSTED, WILLIAM. 

William Barksted appears in the actor-list of Jonson's Epkoene, 
which, according to the folio of 161 6, was "Acted in the yeere 
1609, by the Children of her Maiesties Revells." He belonged to 
the Lady Elizabeth's troupe by August 19, 161 1, on which date 
he and his fellow-actors gave Philip Henslowe a bond of £500 
to perform "certen articles" of agreement (H.P., pp. 18, iii). 
The 1679 folio of Beaumont and Fletcher names him as one of 
the "principal actors" in The Coxcomb, which may have been 
acted by the Lady Elizabeth's men about 1613 (EUx,. Stage, ii. 
i-'yi). He may be the "Baxter" named in the Articles of Grievance 
as a fellow of Lady Elizabeth's company with Joseph Taylor 
between March, 1613, and March, 1614. By March xo, 1616, he 
had joined the company under the patronage of Prince Charles, 
for on that date, with his fellow-actors, he signed an agreement 
with Alleyn and Meade. Since his signature does not appear with 
the undated letter (c. 161 6-17) from his company to Alleyn, he 
had probably retired soon after joining Prince Charles's men 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(H.P., pp. 58, 87, 90, 93). In addition to being an actor he was 
also a poet and dramatist. His Poems (ed. Grosart, Occasional 
Issues of Unique or Very Rare Books, 1876, iii) are Mirrha (1607), 
896 lines, with commendatory verses by his kinsman Robert 
Glover, I. W., Lewes Machin, and William Bagnall, and Hiren 
(161 1), 9IX lines, which has sonnets addressed to Henry Earl of 
Oxford and Elizabeth Countess of Derby. On the title-page of 
the latter Barksted is described as "one of the seruants of his 
Maiesties Revels," which led Fleay (Drama, i. 19) to suggest 
that the phrase was repeated from an earlier edition, not extant, 
of about 1607. This theory may receive some confirmation from 
the connection of Machin with the King's Revels, which pre- 
sented his comedy of The Dumb Knight, (pr. 1608); but it 
must also be remembered that the Children of the Queen's Revels 
appear to have been sometimes referred to as the King's Revels 
in provincial records of about 1611 (Eli^. Stage, ii. 301). Bark- 
sted's name is found on the title-page of some copies of Marston's 
Insatiate Countess (quarto of 163 1), and it has been suggested that 
Marston, "on entering the church, left this tragedy in a frag- 
mentary state, and that it was completed by the actor Barksteed" 
(Bullen, Marston, i. p. li; iii. 12.5). John Taylor, the Water Poet, 
gives us two samples of seventeenth-century wit in which Bark- 
sted is the hero. In Wit and Mirth (16x9), p. 11, he writes: 

Will. Backstead the Plaier cast his Chamber-lye out of his win- 
dow in the night, which chanced to light vpon the heads of the 
watch passing by; who angerly said, Who is it that offers vs this 
abuse? Why, quoth Will, who is there? Who is here, said one of 
the pickled watchmen, we are the Watch. The Watch, quoth 
William, why my friends, you know, Harme watch, harme catch. 

And in his Taylors Feast (1638), p. 14 (Works, iii), he tells how 
"Will Baxted, a late well knowne fine Comedian, went in a 
Morning, on one of the Twelve dayes in Christmas time, upon 
occasion of businesse to speake with an old rich miserable 
House-keeper." When the business had been attended to, Bark- 

Z9 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

sted persuaded a servant that, as a matter of courtesy, he should 
go to the cellar and drink to the health of the master of the house. 
He ate "a goodly Coller of Brawne" and drank so much "strong 
Beere in a Horne-cup," that the "old Mizer in a rage gave his 
man warning to provide him another Master, for hee would 
keepe no such riotting knaves that would entertaine such bold 
Guests." 

BARKSTEED. 

See William Barksted. 

BARNE, WILL. 

From the extant plot of i Tamar Cam, acted by the Admiral's 
men about October, 1601., it appears that "little Will Barne" 
was the boy-actor who assumed the parts of Tarmia in the play 
and a Pigmy in the procession (H.P., p. 154). Fleay conjectures 
that he also acted Leonora in the Admiral's play of Frederick and 
Basilea in June, 1597 (Stage, p. 141). 

BARNES, THOMAS. 

Thomas Barnes's name appears in a warrant of July 2., 16x9, 
appointing certain members of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of 
Bohemia's) company as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahr- 
buch, xlvi. 95). 

BARRET, JOHN. 

John Barret is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town. He played the title-role in Richard's Mes- 
sallina, the Roman Empress, printed in 1640 as "acted with generall 
applause divers times by the Company of his Majesties Revells" 
(Murray, i. 2.79-81). 

BARRETT, WALTER. 

The name of Walter Barrett appears in a license granted to the 
Children of the Revels to the late Queen Anne on April 9, 162.3 
(Murray, i. 36x; ii. 2.72.-73). 

30 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BARRY, DAVID LORDING. 

As a lessee of the Whitefriars playhouse in 1608 David Lording 
Barry owned one whole share in the syndicate. He died in i6jo 
(^Adams, Playhouses, pp. 313-17; see also, Adams, "Lordinge 
(alias 'Lodowick') Barry," Mod. Phil., ix. 567; Lawrence, 
"The Mystery of Lodowick Barry," Stud, in Phil., xiv. 52.). 
His play, Ram Alley, "A Comedy Divers times here-to-fore acted 
by the Children of the Kings Reuels," was printed in 161 1. 

BARTLE, ONYE (?). 

Alexander Bartle, son of "Onye (?), a player," was baptized 
at St. Saviour's on February 17, 1603 (Bentley, T. L. S., Nov. 
15, 192.8, p. 856). See the following entry. 

BARTON, ONESIPHORUS. 

A player, buried at St. Giles's on March 9, 1608 (Elix.. Stage, 
n. 301). 

BASSE, THOMAS. 

On August 2.9, 1 61 1, Thomas Basse and his fellow-actors of the 
Lady Elizabeth's troupe gave Philip Henslowe a bond of £500 
to perform "certen articles" of agreement QH.P., pp. 18, iii). 
The 1679 folio of Beaumont and Fletcher names him as one of the 
"principal actors" in The Honest Man's Fortune, played in 1613 
by what is quite clearly the Lady Elizabeth's men. By 1617 he 
belonged to Queen Anne's men, for as a new member of the com- 
pany on June 3, 1617, he refused to sign an agreement with Susan 
Baskervile. On May 13, 1619, he attended Queen Anne's funeral 
QElii. Stage, ii. x.t,G, i.^^, i5 1). After the Queen's death her London 
company was known as the Players of the Revels at the Red Bull, 
of which Basse is noted in i6xi as one of the "chiefe players" 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). 

BAXTER. 

See William Barksted. 

31 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BAXTER, RICHARD. 

In April, 162.2., Richard Baxter (or Backster), a member of the 
Red Bull company, while acting, accidentally wounded John Gill, 
a feltmaker's apprentice, who was sitting on the stage during a 
play. Gill threatened "Mr. Baxter and the other Redbull players 
to ruyn theire house and persons," if they did not give him 
satisfaction. Nothing seems to have come of the threat except a 
noisy demonstration by the apprentices at Clerkenwell (Jeaffre- 
son, Middlesex, ii. 166, 175). His name appears in a license 
granted on April 9, 16x3, to the Children of the Revels to the 
late Queen Anne (Murray, i. 362.; ii. x-jx-j-^. He is not mentioned 
in the patent of June X4, 16x5, to the King's men, but later he 
acted minor parts in plays presented by the company. He is named 
in the list of actors prefixed to Ford's Lover s Melancholy , which 
was licensed on November 2.4, 162.8 (Murray, i. opp. 172.). He 
seems to have played in Beaumont and Fletcher's Mad Lover 
(possibly in a revival about 1630), as noted in the stage-direction, 
IV. i: "Enter a Servant and R. Bax" (Works, iii. 456). In Mas- 
singer's Believe as You List (licensed May 7, 1631) he is assigned 
three parts in marginal annotations to the play: Titus, Officer, 
Servant (Croker's edition, pp. 45, 79, 95; Adams, Dram. Rec, 
p. 33). He is included in the "Players Pass" issued to the King's 
men on May 17, 1636 (Murray, loc. cit.'). Since he appears to have 
assumed minor parts in both The Mad Lover and Believe as You 
List, he may possibly be identified with the "Richard Bagstare" 
named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on January 12., 1636, to 
the attendants of the King's men at Blackfriars (Stopes, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 99). Nothing is heard of him during the period of the Civil 
War and Commonwealth, but he is probably identical with the 
person of the same name who appears in the early Restoration 
company under the management of Thomas Killigrew. This 
troupe became His Majesty's Company of Comedians at the 
Theatre Royal, which was opened on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, Diary, 
iii. 107); but Baxter does not appear in any of the actor-lists as 

32- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

given by Downes (Ros. Ang. , pp. i. ff.)- He seems to have been dead- 
er retired by February 8, 1667, w^hen his name is deleted from the 
warrant for liveries (Nicoll, Rest. Drama, p. z83). 

BAXTER, ROBERT. 

In the 1616 folio of Jonson's plays Robert Baxter is named as 
one of the principal actors in Cynthia's Revels, presented by the 
Children of the Chapel Royal in 1600 (Elii. Stage, iii. 363). He 
may have been a member of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe in 1613, 
for "one Baxter" is named in the Articles of Grievance as a 
fellow with Joseph Taylor between March, 1613, and March, 
1 614. However, there is a possibility that the "Baxter" of 1613, 
whose Christian name is not given, may be identified with Wil- 
liam Barksted. There is no evidence that either was the author 
of the "Baxters tragedy" mentioned in Henslowe's Diary in 1602. 
(Greg, H.P., pp. 58, 87). 

BAYLYE. 

A member of the Children of Paul's at some date before i58z. 
He appears as a legatee in the will of Sebastian Westcott, dated 
April 3, 158X5 where he is named among the "sometimes children 
of the said almenerey," i.e. St. Paul's (Elix.. Stage, ii. i5«.). 
See Thomas Bayly. 

BAYLY, EDWARD. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
1 6x8, Edward Bayly was at Norwich on July 2. of the same year 
(Murray, ii. 103). 

BAYLY, THOMAS. 

Joseph Hunter (Hallamshire, p. 80) prints a Latin letter written 
by Thomas Bayly to Thomas Bawdewine, from Sheffield, on 
April X5, 1 5 81. Bayly thanks Bawdewine for having supplied 
the tragedy presented at Sheffield, the seat of Lord Shrewsbury, 
on St. George's day. The tragedy had proved such a delightful 

33 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

diversion that Bayly requests Bawdewine to procure for him 
another play, "short, novel, pleasing, attractive, charming, 
witty, full of buffoonery, rascality, and wrangling, and replete 
with hangings, banditries, and panderings of every kind." He 
says that in matters of this kind, Wilson (doubtless Robert) of 
Leicester's troupe is "willing and able to do much." Chambers 
QEliz. Stage, ii. 89, 301) suggests that Bayly belonged to a pro- 
vincial company of players under the patronage of Lord Shrews- 
bury. However, the play referred to seems likely to have 
been a private performance rather than a production by a pro- 
vincial troupe. This inference is supported by the facts that 
Bayly wrote good Latin, that the play was given in Latin, and 
that the audience was fashionable. Rather than a provincial 
player, perhaps Bayly was a member of Shrewsbury's household. 
Possibly he is to be identified with Baylye (^.f.) of Paul's boys, 
who would probably have had training in Latin. The letter 
follows: 

Nos Domini nostri comediatores, gratulationes ad te nostras, 
summa cum gratiarum actione, presentamus; inter alia, in nos 
tua beneficia saepius illata, hoc imprimis in memoriam reducentes, 
quod traiediam hanc nostram (qua cum sancti Georgii festum hoc 
celebravimus) satis sane venustam et laudatam, necessariis im- 
plementis procuraveris : qua quidem actione, summa nobis (licet 
indignus) accidit commendatio. Audientes enim et non intelli- 
gentes, jestura et forma; intelligentes vero, res ipsa, tanta affecit 
oblectatione, ut quidam non inferioris conditionis homines, nos 
instanter aliquod simile quam breviter possumus, exercitare et 
ostendere postulant. Unde fit, ut tuam rursus opem petere cogi- 
mur, rogantes ut librum aliquem brevem, novum, iucundum, 
venestum, lepidum, hillarem, scurrosum, nebulosum, rabulosum, 
et omnimodis carnificiis, latrociniis, et lenociniis refertum, 
perscrutare et ad nos mittere digneris: qua in re dicunt quod 
Wilsonus quidam Leycestrii comitis servus (fidibus pollens) 
multum vult et potest facere, precipere si Morgani nostri nomine 
tantum postules. Valeas precor. ShefF. xxv. Aprill 1581. 

tuus dum sit 

Tho. Bayly. 

34 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Yf my brother Wm be at the court, I pray you commend me to 
him; and chyde him for that he will not take paines to write to 
me. And tell R. Rotherford that yf he want any money, he 
knoweth where I dwell. I have sent him tokens by this berar. 

To my very lovinge frend Mr. Thomas Bawdewine, at Could- 
harbar, in London. 

BEART, RUDOLF. 

In the autumn of 1608 Rudolf Beart appeared as a player at 
Frankfort, Germany (Herz, p. 53). He was then in company 
with Robert Arzschar and Heinrich Greum. 

BEDOWE, ELIS. 

Elis Bedowe is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town (Murray, i. xyg-So). 

BEE, WILLIAM. 

Two references to "William Bee" are preserved. Kempe, on 
his famous dance from London to Norwich in 1599, was accom- 
panied by "his servant" William Bee (Nine Dates Wonder, ed. 
Dyce, p. 3). This Bee is not known to have been an actor, but 
was not improbably associated with Kempe in the latter's 
stage clownery. Not until May x6, i6i4, do we again find notice 
of a William Bee, who may or may not be identical with the 
Bee associated with Kemp in 1599. On this date Francis Wambus 
(^.v.), a member of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe, and William 
Bee, evidently a fellow-actor with Wambus, were discharged 
from the Norwich prison (Murray, ii. 350). The William Bee of 
the Norwich records, however, has been conjectured to be William 
Beeston Qq^.v.'). 

BEESTON. 

The Beestons were an old theatrical family. In the Barnstaple 
records of 1560-61 there is a payment of Ss. to one "Beeston and 
his felowes for playinge an interlude" (Murray, ii. 198). 

35 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BEESTON, CHRISTOPHER. 

The first appearance of Christopher Beeston in dramatic his- 
tory rests upon the conjecture that he is the "Kit" who played 
a Soldier in "Envy" and a Captain in "Sloth" of 2 Seven Deadly 
Sins, presented by Strange's company about 1590 (Greg, H.P., 
i5x; R.E.S., i. i6z). Possibly he remained with Strange's men 
until they became the Lord Chamberlain's, for he belonged to 
the latter company in 1598 when they played Every Man in his 
Humor, his name appearing in the list of the original "principall 
Comoedians" affixed to the text in the Jonson folio of 1616. 
But he is not named in the 162.3 folio list of actors in Shakespeare's 
plays. Sometime during his stage-career he was apprenticed to 
Augustine Phillips, who in his will dated May 4, 1605, leaves 
"to my servaunte, Christopher Beeston, thirty shillings in gould" 
(Collier, Actors, p. 86). By i6oz he had become associated with 
the Earl of Worcester's men, to whom he sold properties in 
August and October of that year, and for whom he authorized 
payments in November, i6oi, and January, 1603 (H.D., i. 180, 
184, 185, 186). Early in the reign of James I Worcester's men be- 
came Queen Anne's company, and Beeston, who bore the alias 
of Hutchinson, remained with this troupe until 1619. We find him 
in the list of players receiving red cloth for the procession of 
March 15, 1604, in the patent of April 15, 1609, in a warrant to 
appear before the Privy Council for playing during Lent, March 
2.9, 1 61 5, in arrears to contributions for the repair of highways 
near the Red Bull playhouse, October 4, 1616, and in Queen 
Anne's funeral procession. May 13, 1619. When Thomas Greene 
died in i6iz Beeston was chosen to take his place as general 
director and business manager of the company, at which time he 
was well-to-do, while the associate actors were men of small 
means. He was a witness to Greene's will dated July i5, 1612.. 
The disposal of Greene's property led several years later to a 
lawsuit with Susan Baskervile, Greene's widow, in which 
Beeston took a prominent part. The 16^3 account of the dispute 

36 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

shows quite clearly that Beeston's transactions in his managerial 
capacity were not always to his credit (the Baskervile documents 
are printed in Fleay, Sfage, pp. 2.70-97). Another lawsuit also 
gives evidence as to how unsatisfactorily he managed the affairs 
of the company. Possibly from an earlier date, but certainly 
from 1612. to 1619, he purchased the apparel and other equipment 
used in staging plays. In 1612. he arranged with John Smith to 
supply the company with all "tinsell stuffes and other stuffe" 
that might be required. Between June Tjy of that year and Febru- 
ary 13, 1617, Smith delivered goods to the value of £46 5J-. 8^., 
for which he claims he received no payment. This, together with 
Beeston's unsatisfactory manner of handling the company's 
money and rendering an account thereof, led to the Smith- 
Beeston dispute. Beeston apparently gave a false account for the 
expenditure of £400, and his associates accused him of having 
"much enritched himself" at their expense. In the proceedings 
of 1619 he is described as having been in i6ix "a thriving man, 
and one that was of ability and means." The result of the suit is 
unknown (the records of the dispute are printed by Wallace, 
N.U.S., ix. 315-37). At the death of Queen Anne in 1619, Beeston 
went as manager to Prince Charles's company. He took with him, 
it is claimed, the apparel and furniture of the Red Bull stage, 
although these had been bought with the company's money 
(Wallace, Ibid., p. 317). Charges against Beeston's honesty are 
not infrequent; but it is evident from his subsequent career that 
he was one of the most prominent theatrical managers of his 
time. In 1617 he erected the Cockpit in Drury Lane (Adams, 
Playhouses, pp. 350-58), where he seems to have successively 
managed Queen Anne's men (1617-19), Prince Charles's men 
(i6i9-xx). Lady Elizabeth's men (i6xx-2.5), Queen Henrietta's 
men (16x5-37), and the King and Queen's Young Company, 
popularly known as Beeston's Boys (1637-39). As a member of 
the Lady Elizabeth's company at the Cockpit in i6ix, he is 
mentioned among "the chiefe of them at the Phoenix" (Adams, 

37 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Dram. Rec, p. 63). He seems to have died before August 10, 1639, 
for on that date his son, William, is referred to as the Governor 
of Beeston's Boys (Adams, Playhouses, p. 358«.). In 1639 the 
control of the lease of the Cockpit was in the hands of Mrs. 
Elizabeth Beeston, alias Hutchinson, seemingly Christopher's 
second wife, since the Middlesex records for 161 5-17 give several 
true bills for recusancy against an earlier wife Jane. In these 
records Beeston is described as a gentleman or yeoman, and as 
"late of St. James-at-Clerkenwell," or, in one case, "of Turmil 
streete." In 1617 Henry Baldwin and Christopher Longe were 
held "for a riotous assalte and spoyle done upon the dwellinge 
house of Christopher Beeston" (Jeaffreson, Middlesex, ii. 107, no, 
114, ixo, 12.8, 2.xo). The registers of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, 
record the baptism of the following children: Augustine, No- 
vember 16, 1604; Christopher, December i, 1605; and Robert, 
April z, 1609; and the burial of Augustine, November 17, 1604; 
Jane, September xx, 1607; Christopher, July 15, 1610; and Robert, 
December x6, 161 5, at which time Beeston's address is given as 
Clerkenwell (Stopes, Burbage, pp. 139, 140, 141). The registers of 
St. James, Clerkenwell, record the baptism of a daughter Anne on 
September 15, 1611, and the burial of a servant on July i, 161 5 
(Hovenden, i. 6x; iv. 131). He seems to have later returned to 
St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, for his name is traceable in the register 
up to 1637 (Collier, Actors, p. xxxii). He contributed verses to 
Heywood's Apology (i6ix), p. 11, where he addresses the author 
as his "good friend and fellow," and briefly vindicates the rec- 
reation that the playhouse offered to the public. 

BEESTON, ROBERT. 

Robert Beeston was probably a member of Queen Anne's com- 
pany from its formation late in 1603 or early in 1604 (since his 
name appears in the undated draft license) till 161 7, when the 
troupe visited Norwich. He took part in the coronation proces- 
sion of March 15, 1604, wearing a cloak of red cloth. His name 

38 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

occurs in both the license of April 15, 1609, and the duplicate 
patent issued to the traveling company on January 7, 1611. 
QM.S.C, i. 2.65, 170; Murray, i. 186, 191}. He seems to have been 
with the Queen's men at Norwich on May 6, 1615, and May 31, 
1617, for his name is given in the abstracts of the license in the 
Norwich records (Murray, ii. 340, 343); but this evidence is not 
conclusive, since Thomas Greene, who died in i6ix, is also named 
in the Norwich records of 161 5 and 1617. 

BEESTON, WILLIAM. 

If we may identify William Beeston with the "Willm Bee" 
of the Norwich records (but see William Bee), he was a member 
of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe when "Bee" and Francis Wambus 
were discharged from the Norwich prison on May x6, 16x4 
(Murray, ii. 350). The next two notices of him are also meagre, 
but show that he was concerned in theatrical matters (A. Nicoll, 
Times Lit. SufpL, Nov. iz, 192.3, p. 789). A brief entry, dated 
February 14, 16x7, gives "A peticon of Wm: Beeston against Sr 
John Wentworth," and another records, November ii, 1631, 
"A petition of William Blagrove & William Beeston that his 
Lo would restore vnto them a boy named Stephen Hamerton in- 
veigled from them by one Christopher Babham & by him im- 
ployed at the Blackfryars playhouse." At the latter date Beeston 
was probably one of the managers of the King's Revels company, 
which had been organized by Blagrove and Richard Gunnell 
when they built the Salisbury Court playhouse in 16x9. We hear 
no more of Beeston until May iz, 1637, when he and his fellows 
of Beeston 's Boys were summoned before the Privy Council for 
playing at the Cockpit during plague quarantine (^M.S.C, i. 39x). 
In 1639 Christopher Beeston died, and William succeeded his 
father as Governor of Beeston's Boys at the Cockpit in Drury 
Lane. He is referred to as their Governor on August 10, 1639, 
when he obtained an order to prevent any other company from 
acting the plays belonging to his troupe. Nevertheless, his career 

39 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

as Governor was of short duration. Early in May, 1640, he 
allowed his Boys to act without license a play that gave great 
offense to King Charles I, because "it had relation to the passages 
of the Kings journey into the Northe, and was complaynd of by 
his Majestye, . . . with commande to punishe the offenders" 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 66). The company was ordered to stop 
playing, and on May 4 Beeston was committed to the Marshalsea 
prison. However, on May 7, the players having offered a "petition 
of submission," Sir Henry Herbert restored them to their liberty. 
But soon the players again abused their privileges, and as a 
result of the indiscretion, Beeston was deposed from his position 
as manager. On June xy, 1640, William Davenant succeeded him 
as Governor of the Cockpit players (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 358- 
61). Neither Beeston's misfortunes as manager nor the closing 
of the playhouses in 1642. quenched his theatrical interests. In 
1649 he began negotiations for the purchase of the playhouse in 
Salisbury Court, which was dismantled by soldiers on March 2.4, 
1649, before the deed of sale was signed. Three years later, how- 
ever, he purchased the property, and in April, 1660, refitted the 
playhouse at a cost of about £32.9. Before he finished paying the 
carpenters, the building was destroyed by the Great Fire of 1666. 
The mortgage was apparently forfeited, and Beeston lost the 
property (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 380-83). The Middlesex docu- 
ments cite him in a list of suspected recusants, April 2.x, 1680, 
at which time he is described as being of St. Leonard's, Shore- 
ditch (Jeaffreson, iv. 145). Aubrey, who visited him on several 
occasions to glean information about the older poets and actors, 
records his death in i68z: "Old Mr. Beeston . . . died at his 
house in Bishopsgate street without, about Bartholomew-tyde, 
i68x" (Lives, i. 97). Beeston's son, George, continued ^the his- 
trionic tradition of his family (Sidney Lee, Nineteenth Century, 
1901, li. iio), and some of the following notices may refer to 
him rather than to his father. "Mr. Beeston" had a part in 
Shirley's Sisters, for his name is found in the prompter's copy 

40 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

which appears to have belonged to Davenant's company in Drury 
Lane about 1666 (Works, v. 354). Pepys records on February x, 
1668-69 (Diary, viii. 104) that he went to the — 

King's playhouse, where the Heyresse, notwithstanding Kinas- 
ton's being beaten, is acted. . . . His part is done by Beeston, 
w^ho is fain to read it out of a book all the while, and thereby 
spoils the part, and almost the play, it being one of the best 
parts in it. . . . But it was pleasant to see Beeston come in 
with the others, supposing it to be dark, and yet he is forced to 
read his part by the light of the candles : and this I observing to 
a gentleman that sat by me, he was mightily pleased therewith, 
and spread it up and down. 

Downes records his parts as Roderigo in The Moor of Vencie, and 
Nigrinus in Tyrannick Love (Ros. Ang., pp. x, 7, 10). Beeston long 
retained the respect of the play-going and literature-loving pub- 
lic, and in the reign of Charles I the curious often resorted to his 
house in Hog Lane, Shoreditch, to listen to his reminiscences of 
Shakespeare and of the poets of Shakespeare's time. John Aubrey 
sought his personal acquaintance, in order to "take from him 
the lives of all the old English poets," and Dry den called him 
' 'the chronicle of the stage. ' ' To Aubrey goes the credit for having 
preserved the fragments of Beeston's conversation (Lives, i. 96 fF.; 
ii. zxy, ^33, 2.35). Richard Brome (Works, iii. 339) compliments 
him in a note appended to The Antipodes (1640): 

Courteous Reader, You shal find in this Booke more then was 
presented upon the Stage, and left out of the Presentation, for 
superfluous length (as some of the Players pretended) I thoght 
good al should be inserted according to the allowed Original; 
and as it was, at first, intended for the Cock-fit Stage, in the right 
of my most deserving Friend Mr. William Beeston, unto whom it 
properly appertained; and so I leave it to thy perusal, as it was 
generally applauded, and well acted at Salisbury Court. Farewell. 

Ri. Brome. 

A further testimony to Beeston's knowledge of stage-affairs is 
borne by Francis Kirkman, who, in dedicating to him The Loves 

41 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

and Adventures of Clerico and ho%la (1651), writes (Adams, Vlay- 
houses, p. 359): 

Divers times in my hearing, to the admiration of the whole 
company, you have most judiciously discoursed of Poesie: which 
is the cause I preseume to choose you for my patron and pro- 
tector, who are the happiest interpreter and judge of our English 
stage-plays this nation ever produced; which the poets and 
actors of these times cannot (without ingratitude) deny; for I 
have heard the chief and most ingenious acknowledge their 
fames and profits essentially sprung from your instruction, 
judgment, and fancy. 

Thomas Nashe dedicated his Strange Netves (159O to a "William 
Beeston," probably the theatrical manager's grandfather, whom 
he addresses as "Maister Apis lapis" and "Gentle M. William" 
(Works, i. 2.55). Nashe laughs at his patron's struggles with 
syntax in his efforts to write poetry, and at his indulgence in 
drink, which betrayed itself in his red nose. But, in spite of this 
characteristic frankness, Nashe greets the first William Beeston 
as a boon companion who was generous in his entertainment of 
threadbare scholars. 

BEHEL, JACOB. 
See Jacob Pedel. 

BELT, T. 

In 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Lord Strange's company 
about 1590, T. Belt played a Servant in the Induction, and 
Panthea in "Lechery" (Greg, H.P., p. i5z; R.E.S., i. i6i). 

BENFIELD, ROBERT. 

The 1679 folio of Beaumont and Fletcher names Robert Ben- 
field as one of the "principal actors" in The Coxcomb and The 
Honest Man s Fortune, both of which were probably acted by the 
Lady Elizabeth's company in 1613 (Eli^. Stage, ii. ^51). Subse- 
quently he became a King's man, but at what date is uncertain. 
William Ostler died on December 16, 1614, and Benfield may have 

42- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

taken his place in the King's company, for in Webster's Duchess 
of Malfi he assumed the part of Antonio which had been acted 
by Ostler. As a King's man he appears in the patent of March 2.7, 
1619; in the livery-allowance lists of May 19, 1619, and April. 7, 
161.1; in the submission for playing The Spanish Viceroy without 
license, December xo, 16x4; in King James's funeral procession, 
May 7, 16x5; in the patent of June x4, 16x5; in the cloak-allow- 
ance list of May 6, 162.9; and in the 16x3 folio list of actors in 
Shakespeare's plays. In 1635 he owned one share in the Globe 
and one-third of a share in Blackfriars (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 
8; Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 313-14), which he doubtless 
held until the closing of the playhouses in 1641. He seems to 
have been a member of the company to the end, for he signed the 
dedication of the Beaumont and Fletcher folio of 1647. The burial 
of his son, Robert, October 15, 1617, is recorded at St. Bartholo- 
mew's the Great; and the registers of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, 
give the burial of two more of his children, Bartholomew, July 
ii, 1631, and Elizabeth, August i, 1631 (Collier, iii. 471, 472.). 
He had parts in many of the Beaumont and Fletcher plays (Mur- 
ray, i. opp. 172.): The Knight of Malta (c. 1618); The Mad Lover (c. 
1 61 8); The Humorous Lieutenant (c. 161 9); Women Pleased Qc. 161.6); 
The Custom of the Country (c. i6i9-xo); The Double Marriage (c. 1619- 
xo); The Little French Lawyer (c. i6zo); The False One (c. i6xo-xi); 
The Pilgrim (c. i6xi); The Prophetess (i6xx); The Spanish Curate 
(i6zx; Works, ii. 60); The Lovers' Progress (16x3); The Maid in the 
Mill (16x3); Wife for a Month (16x4); and De Gard, "a noble 
stayd gentleman," in The Wildgoose Chase (a revival, 1631). He 
also acted in the following plays: Boisise and a Captain in 
Barnavelt (1619; ed. Frijlinck, p. clx); Antonio, formerly played 
by Ostler, in Webster's Duchess of Malfi (c. 1619-X3; Murray, 
ii. i46fF.); Junius Rusticus in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed 
October 11, 16x6); Ford's Lover's Melancholy (licensed November 
X4, 16x8); Ladislaus, King of Hungary, in Massinger's Picture 
(licensed June 8, 16x9); the King in Carlell's Deserving Favorite 

43 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(published 16x9); and Marcellus in Massinger's Believe as You 
List (licensed May 7, 1631). On January x8, 1648, he and other 
members of the King's company gave a bond to pay off an old 
Blackfriars debt to the heirs of Michael Bowyer. He was dead by 
the Easter term, 1655 (Hotson, pp. 31-34). 

BENTLEY, JOHN. 

John Bentley was born about 1553, for the record of his burial 
in 1585 gives his age as "yers 3x" (Gower, Reg. of St. Peter s, 
Cornhill, i. 153). In 1583 he was a member of the Queen's troupe 
in London; for he is named in a City record that gives the per- 
sonnel of the company at this time (Elix.. Stage, ii. 106). He was 
with the Queen's men at Norwich in June, 1583, when an affray 
occurred, concerning which depositions of witnesses remain. It 
seems that the company was performing at the Red Lion Inn, 
with Bentley playing "the Duke." After the play had started, 
one Wynsdon tried to gain admittance without paying, and in 
the ensuing scuffle overset the money. Three of the players, 
Tarlton, Bentley, and Singer, ran to see what the trouble was. 
Wynsdon then fled, and was pursued by Singer and Bentley, 
Tarlton in vain trying to restrain Bentley. During the pursuit, 
Wynsdon was joined by his servant, "a man in a blue coat," who 
threw a stone at Bentley and "broke his head." But Bentley, now 
joined by Henry Browne, Sir William Paston's man, continued 
the pursuit. When Bentley and Browne overtook the "man in the 
blue coat," they thrust at him with their swords, and one of 
them gave him the wound from which he died (Halliwell- 
Phillipps, Illustrations, p. 118). An undated letter from W. P. to 
Edward Alleyn refers to a theatrical wager that the great tra- 
gedian could equal Bentley and Knell in any of their own parts 
(H.P., p. 3x}. Heywood mentions him with others as having 
flourished before his time, i.e. before about 1594 QApology, p. 43). 
He is lauded by Nashe in Pierce Penilesse (1592.), where he is 
noticed with Tarlton, Alleyn, and Knell (Works, i. xi5). In A 

44 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Knighfs Conjuring (1607), p. 75, Dekker places him in the com- 
pany of the poets: "tho hee had bene a player, molded out of 
their pennes, yet because he had bene their louer, and a register 
to the Muses, inimitable Bentley." He may be the John Bentley 
whom Ritson records as "the authour of a few short poems in a 
manuscript collection belonging to Samuel Lysons esquire" 
(Bibliografhia Poetica, p. 1x9). His burial is noted in the register 
of St. Peter's Cornhill, August 19, 1585: "Thursday John Bentley 
one of ye Queens players, pit in ye north ile. yers 3^" (Gower, i. 
133). His will was proved in 1585 in the Prerogative Court of 
Canterbury, and the Index describes him as "servaunt to the 
Queene, All Saints, Lombardstreet, London" (Smith-Fry, 
Canterbury Wills, iv. 39). The will, which might yield information 
on the Queen's men, has not been printed. 

BIEL, JACOB. 

See Jacob Pedel. 

BIERDT, BURCHART. 

Burchart Bierdt, "Englischer Musicant," was at Cologne, 
Germany, in November, i6ii (Cohn, Jahrbuch, xxi. X57). 

BILLINGESLEY, JOHN. 

For the performance of Paris and Vienna at Court by the West- 
minster boys on February 19, 157^, John Billingesley served as 
payee (Steele, p. 41). 

BIRgn, GEORGE. 

George Birch, carrier, aged 3x, appears about 1530 as a witness 
in a lawsuit between John Rastell and Henry Walton concerning 
the use of certain playing garments for a royal banquet at Green- 
wich about 15x7 (Pollard, Fifteenth Century, p. 316). He was 
doubtless a Court Interluder from 1538 to about 1559, for his 
name is traceable in the records, where his salary is given as £3 
6j-. 8^. a year. An annuity to a George Birch by a warrant on 

45 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

January 7, 1560, is recorded in the Chamber Accounts of the 
early years of Elizabeth's reign (Collier, i. 116, 117, 136, 165; 
Eliz- Stage, ii. 83). 

BIRCH, GEORGE. 

George Birch was a member of the King's company. His name 
appears in the submission of the King's men for playing The 
Spanish Viceroy without license, December xo, 16x4; in the list of 
players who took part in King James's funeral procession, May 
7, 1615; and in the patent of June X4, 1615. He is not named in 
the patent of March 2.-j, 1619, but apparently joined the company 
soon after this date, for he played Morier in Barnavelt (ed. 
Frijlinck, p. clx) about August, 161 9. He also had parts in the 
following Beaumont and Fletcher plays acted by the King's men 
(Murray, i. opp. 17^): The Double Marriage (c. i6i9-zo); The 
False One Qc. i6io-ii); The Laws of Candy (c. 1619; Works, iii. X36); 
The Pilgrim (c. i6xi); The Island Princess (c. i6xi); The Prophetess 
(i6ii); The Lovers' Progress (16x3); and Wife for a Month (16x4). 
The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records on November 
18, 16x3, the baptism of Bridgett Birch, daughter of George, "a 
player"; and the marriage on January 2.8, 1619, of George Birch 
and Elizabeth Cowley, "with license" (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 
19x8, p. 856). 

BIRCH, JOHN. 

From 1547 to 1556 John Birch seems to have been a Court 
Interluder, at a salary of £3 6s. Sd. a year (Collier, i. 136, 165). 

BIRD, THEOPHILUS. 

The date at which Theophilus Bird (or Bourne) joined Queen 
Henrietta's men is uncertain, for the dates of the plays in which 
he acted are conjectural. He is known to have had the following 
parts in plays given by the Queen's company at the Cockpit in 
Drury Lane (Murray, i. opp. x66): Paulina in Massinger's Renegado 
(pr. 1630); Toota, Queen of Fesse, in Heywood's Fair Maid of 

46 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the West, Part II (c. 1630); and Massanissa, in Nabbes's Hannibal 
and Scifio (1635). His name, "Master Bird," appears at the close 
of the Prologue to The Witch of Edmonton (Ford, Works, iii. 173). 
This play, not printed until 1658, may have passed from Prince 
Charles's men to Queen Henrietta's company about 16x5, when 
the latter troupe was organized (Murray, i. X36«.)- When Queen 
Henrietta's company disbanded early in 1637, Bird doubtless 
joined Beeston's Boys, for on May it, 1637, he and other mem- 
bers of Beeston's company were summoned before the Privy 
Council for playing at the Cockpit during plague quarantine 
(M.S.C., i. 392.)- His name is found at the end of the Prologue to 
Ford's Lady's Trial, acted at the Cockpit in May, 1638 (Works, 
iii. 7). In Wright's Historia Histrionica (1699) we find Bird among 
the "eminent actors" listed as "of principal note at the Cock- 
pit" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406). By 1641 he was a King's man, 
his name appearing in a warrant of January xl of that year 
(Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). His name is appended to the dedi- 
catory epistle of the 1647 folio of Beaumont and Fletcher's plays, 
published by a group of the King's players (Works, i. p. x). In 
1651 he served as William Beeston's agent in the purchase of the 
playhouse in Salisbury Court (Adams, Playhouses, p. 381). With 
Andrew Pennycuicke in 1657 he published Ford and Dekker's 
Sun's Darling, with a dedication to the Earl of Southampton 
(Hazlitt, Coll. & Notes, 1 867-1 876, p. 164). His name occurs in the 
list of actors constituting the company under the management 
of Thomas Killigrew, later known as His Majesty's Company 
of Comedians at the Theatre Royal, but in none of the actor- 
lists as given by Downes (Ros. Aug., p. x). He was dead by April 
2.%, 1663, when Charles II took a hand in "the disposition of a 
share in the company fallen in by death of Theoph. Bird" 
(S.P.D. Charles II, Ixxii. 45). On January i8, 1648, he joined 
certain other members of the King's company in signing a bond 
to pay off an old Blackfriars debt to Michael Bowyer's heirs. 
The debt was not paid by Easter term, 1655, at which time 

47 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Thomas Morrison, who had married Bowyer's widow, brought 
suit againt Bird. He was Christopher Beeston's son-in-law 
(Hotson, pp. 31-34, 91). 

BIRD, WILLIAM. 

With several of his fellows of the Earl of Pembroke's company, 
William Bird, alias Bourne, is complainant in a lawsuit during 
1597 against Francis Langley, builder and owner of the Swan 
playhouse (Wallace, Eng. Studien, xliii. 340; Adams, Playhouses, 
pp. 168-74). -^s a result of the dissolution of the Pembroke com- 
pany, caused by the production of The Isle of Dogs, Bird on August 
10, 1597, offered to bind himself to Henslowe to play with the 
Admiral's men at the Rose, and on October 11 his name is found 
in the company's accounts (H.D., i. 8z, 2.03). From this time to 
i6oz he appears in the Diary as repeatedly authorizing payments, 
borrowing from Henslowe, paying personal debts, selling proper- 
ties, acknowledging company debts in the capacity of share- 
holder, and occasionally as a witness. On November z6, 1600, 
Henslowe lent Bird's wife £3 to free her husband from jail "for 
hurting of a felowe." Besides acting, Bird also turned his hand 
to writing. He and Rowley in collaboration completed Haugh- 
ton's Judas, for which they received £6 in December, 1601. 
Again on November ^.^., i6ox, he and Rowley were paid £4 for 
additions to Doctor Faustus (H.D., i. 80, 151, i5x, i7x). As an 
Admiral's man he played Colmogra and Artabisus in i Tamar Cam 
about October, i6oz QH.F., p. 154). About Christmas, 1603, the 
Admiral's men were taken into the service of Prince Henry; and 
on March 15, 1604, Bird appeared as "one of the servants to the 
young Prince" in the magnificent entertainment presented to 
King James upon his triumphant passage through London. In 
this entertainment Bird represented "Zeal" (Middleton, Works, 
vii. iX4). He is named in the patent to Prince Henry's men on 
April 30, 1606, and in the household list of 1610 (^Eliz- Stage, ii. 
187, 188). The Prince died in November, i6ix, and his troupe 

48 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

soon passed under the patronage of the Palsgrave. Bird is men- 
tioned in the new patent of January ii, 1613 (M.J.C., i. 2.75), 
and in the lease of the Fortune by the Palsgrave's men on October 
31, 1618 (H.P., p. zy). On several occasions during i6i8-ii, in 
company with his wife, his son, or his fellow-actors, he dined 
with Edward Alleyn; and on February 13, i6xi, he met Alleyn 
at the Paul's Head (Young, ii. 81, i4z, 185, xoz, i04). Bird was 
probably a member of the Palsgrave's company until i6ii. He 
is last heard of on May to, 162.1., when he was occupying a tene- 
ment adjoining the Fortune playhouse. In his note on Richard 
Bradshaw's bond, January 8, 1605, he had described himself as 
"of Hogsdon" (Warner, pp. 16, 243). Theregister of St. Saviour's, 
Southwark, records the baptism of two of his sons: William, May 
18, 1600; Francis, January 2.6, 1602. (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 
19x8, p. 856). 

"BLACK DICK." 

In Frederick and Basilea, presented by the Admiral's men in 
1597, "Black Dick" acted the part of a servant, a guard, a mes- 
senger, a confederate, and a jailor (H.P., p. 153). 

BLACKWAGE, WILLIAM. 

Henslowe lent William Blackwage £5 before May 13, 1594. 
He is described as "my lord chamberlenes man," but whether 
he was an actor or a private servant is not known (H.D., ii. 2.43). 

BLACKWOOD, THOMAS. 

The marriage of Thomas Blackwood, described as a player, and 
Ann Clarke is recorded in the register of St. Bodolph Aldgate on 
September 8, i59i (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 98). As a member 
of the Earl of Leicester's troupe in 1601-03 he authorized pay- 
ments on behalf of the company from August 19, i6oz, to March 
7, 1603. On March iz, 1603, he borrowed loj-. from Henslowe 
"when he Ride into the contrey wth his company to playe" 
(H.D., ii. Z44). When acting in London was suspended owing to 

49 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the illness of Queen Elizabeth, Blackwood must have promptly 
left for Germany, since he and John Thare visited Frankfort with 
Robert Browne's troupe at the Easter fair in 1603 (Herz, p. 4x). 

BLAGROVE, WILLIAM. 

As Deputy to the Master of the Revels William Blagrove is 
mentioned several times from 16x4 to 1635 in the records of the 
Office of the Revels in connection with the payments of various 
companies. In this capacity he licensed Glapthorne's Lady 
Mother on October 15, 1635; and during the same year he received 
a gratuity of £3 from the French players (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
pp. 37, 6i). In 16x9 he and Richard Gunnell formed a theatrical 
partnership and built the Salisbury Court Playhouse, which was 
occupied by the Children of the King's Revels until December, 
1 63 1 (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 368-74). He and Gunnell probably 
served as managers. On November 12., 1631, he and William 
Beeston (^.j'.) petitioned that one of their boy-actors, Stephen 
Hammerton C^.v.^, should be returned to them. Blagrove is 
named in a warrant of January X4, 1635, for the payment of £30 
to himself "and the rest of the company" for three plays acted by 
the Children of the Revels at Whitehall in 1631 (Steele, p. X39). 

BLAK, JOHN. 

John Blak was a joint-lessee of the new Fortune playhouse, in 
which he was granted a half-share on February xo, 162.4 (Warner, 
p. X47). 

BLANEY, JOHN. 

John Blaney appears in the actor-list of Jonson's Eficoene, 
which, according to the folio of 1616, was "Acted in the yeere 
1609, by the Children of her Maiesties Revells." By 1616 he had 
joined Queen Anne's men, for in June of that year he is mentioned 
in the Baskervile papers as a member of the company (^Eliz,. 
Stage, ii. X37). Again in June, 1617, he is named in an agreement 
with Susan Baskervile. On May 13, 161 9, he attended Queen 

50 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Anne's funeral as a representative of her London company. 
After the Queen's death her London troupe was known as the 
Players of the Revels at the Red Bull; and Blaney is noted in 162.^ 
as one of "the chiefe players" in this company (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 63). By May, 16x3, the company seems to have disbanded, 
for on May 13 Blaney and two of his fellows pleaded to be ex- 
cused from their payments to Susan Baskervile, in that the other 
players party to the original agreement were either dead or with 
another troupe; and in i6i6 the court dismissed the plea of 
Blaney and Worth, the two surviving plaintiffs (Murray, i. 199). 
Subsequently he joined Queen Henrietta's men at the Cockpit, 
and is known to have played Asambeg, in Massinger's Renegado 
(pr. 1630), presented by this company (Murray, i. opp. z66). 
In 16x3 he lived "neare the Red Bull in St lohns Streete" (Wallace, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). 

BLANK, WILLIAM ALEXANDER. 

A Scottish dancer, who performed at Cologne, Germany, in 
April, 1605 (Cohn, Jahrbuch, xxi. i53). 

BOND, THOMAS. 

Thomas Bond (or Band) appeared as one of the Tritons in The 
Two Noble Ladies, as noted in margin of the Egerton MS. of the 
play (Boas, Library, 1917, viii. X3i, X35). This play was "often 
tymes acted with approbation at the Red Bull in St. John's 
Streete by the company of the Revells" (Bullen, Old Plays, ii. 
430), and is assigned by Fleay to i6i9-xx (Drama, ii. 334). Bond 
is named in a license granted to the Children of the Revels to the 
late Queen Anne on April 9, 16x3 (Murray, i. ^Gt.; ii. 2.ji.-jy). 
We hear no more of him until December, 163 1 (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 45), when he played Miscellanio, a tutor, in Marmion's 
Holland's Leaguer, presented by "the high and mighty Prince 
Charles his servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" 
(Marmion, Works, pp. x, 6). His name appears in a warrant of 
May 10, 1 63X5 appointing several of Prince Charles's men as 

51 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). There is a 
possibility that he played Bussy, in Chapman's Bussy D'Ambois, 
acted by the King's players on Easter-Monday, April 7, 1634, at 
the Cockpit-in-Court (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 55). This conjecture 
is set forth by Waldron, who notes that Kemble identified the 
"third man" in the Prologue to Bussy D'Ambois with Tom Bond 
(^Shak. Miscellany, "English Stage," p. X5). Such an identification 
would give Bond some celebrity as an actor, which merit has not 
been otherwise accorded him. His picture is at Dulwich, and is 
described by Warner, p. xo6: "Tom Bond's picture, an actor, in 
'a band rought with imbrodery, bared neck,' on a board; in a 
black frame, very old." A reproduction of this portrait is given 
by Waldron (pp. cit., opp. p. Z5). 

BORNE, WILLIAM. 

See William Bird. 
BOSEGRAVE, GEORGE. 

George Bosegrave is named in a license granted to the Children 
of the Revels to the late Queen Anne on April 9, 16x3 (Murray, 
i. 362.; ii. 2.-J2.-JT,'). He was a joint-lessee of the new Fortune 
playhouse, in which he obtained "half a twelfth part" on Feb- 
ruary io, 162.4 (Warner, pp. 144, 2.^7). 

BOSGRAVE. 

See George Bosegrave. 
BOURNE, THEOPHILUS. 

See Theophilus Bird. 

BOURNE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Bourne is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town (Murray, i. X79-8o). 

BOURNE, WILLIAM. 
See William Bird. 

52- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BOUSETJOHN. 

See Thomas Sackville. 

BOWER, RICHARD. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1545-61. Because of the initials 
"R. B." o» the title-page. Bower has been suggested as the 
author oi Apius and Virginia, 1575 (Wallace, Evolution, pp. 69 ff., 
77, 105 ff., 108 ff.). 

BOWERS, RICHARD. 

Richard Bowers is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January ix, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 
servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to th^m 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stores, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

BOWRING, GEORGE. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, 
Child Actors, p. in). He may be identical with Gregory Bow- 
ringe, for "George" is possibly a clerical error for "Gregory," 
or vice versa. 

BOWRINGE, GREGORY. 

A member of the Children of Paul's at some date before i58i. 
He appears as a legatee in the will of Sebastian Westcott, dated 
April 3, i58x, where he is named among the "sometimes children 
of the said almenerey," i.e. St. Paul's (Eli:^. Stage, ii. 15^.). 
Possibly he is to be identified with George Bowring Q^.v.'). 

BOWYER, MICHAEL. 

Michael Bowyer was probably with Queen Henrietta's men at 
the Cockpit in Drury Lane from their formation in 16x5 to their 
breaking up in 1637. As a member of this company he had parts 
in the following plays (Murray, i. opp. i66): Beauford, a pas- 
sionate lover of Gratiana, in Shirley's Wedding (c. i6z6); King 

53 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

John in Davenport's King John and Matilda (c. 162.9); Mr. Spencer 
in Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, Part I (c. 1630); Vitelli, a 
gentleman of Venice disguised as a merchant, in Massinger's 
Renegado (pr. 1630); and Scipio in Nabbes's Hannibal and Scipio 
(1635). In Wright's Historia Histrionica (1699) Bowyer is listed 
among the "eminent actors" described as "of principal note at 
the Cockpit" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406). When Queen Hen- 
rietta's company disbanded in 1637 some of the members united 
with the Revels company at Salisbury Court, and others joined 
Beeston's Boys at the Cockpit; but Bowyer is not known to have 
joined either of these troupes. By 1641 he was a King's man, his 
name appearing in a warrant of January 2.i of that year (Stopes, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). Davenport's poem "Too Late to Call Back 
Yesterday" (1639) is dedicated "To my noble friends, Mr. 
Richard Robinson, and Mr. Michael Bowyer" (Bullen, Old 
Plays, New Series, iii. 311). The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate 
record two of Bowyer's sons: William, baptized and buried, 
August 16, i6xi; William, baptized September i, buried Septem- 
ber II, i6xx. His wife's name was Isabell or Elizabeth; both 
forms are given (Denkinger, F.M.L.A., xli. 98). Bowyer made his 
will in September, 1645, ^^^ ^^^^ shortly after. His widow, 
Elizabeth, married one Thomas Morrison. In 1655 Morrison 
brought suit against Theophilus Bird for the recovery of a debt 
incurred some years earlier by members of the King's company 
when Bowyer had advanced £2.00 for the company's use (Hotson, 

PP- 31-34)- 

BRACKENBURY, RICHARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

BRADSHAW, RICHARD. 

In a warrant of February 16, 1595, Richard Bradshaw and 
Francis Coffin are named as members of Lord Edward Dudley's 

54 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

provincial company of players; and with the license of this 
company they appeared at Chester on November zo, i6ox (Mur- 
ray, ii. ^34). On May 19, 1598, Bradshaw, described as Gabriel 
Spencer's man, fetched money for Spencer; and in October of the 
same year he received money on behalf of Dekker and Drayton 
(H.D., i. 79, 97). On October 10, 1598, described as "yeoman 
. . . of St. Saviour's, Southwark," he and two others entered 
into a bond of £5 to repay ^os. to William Bird on March z, 1599. 
This bond was forfeited, and on January 8, 1605, Bird made a note 
of a debt of lox. to Edward Alleyn, with the privilege of recover- 
ing the amount from Bradshaw on the bond (Warner, p. 16). 
He borrowed i^s. and 51. from Henslowe on December 15, i6oo^ 
and April Z9, 1601, to be paid on his return to London (H.D., i. 
133). On the former date he bought from Henslowe one pound 
and two ounces of copper lace, which was probably for the use 
of Dudley's troupe. Coffin, his partner, is not again heard of; 
but Bradshaw seems to have become the leader of a company that 
acted at Reading in 1630 and at Banbury in 1633. At Banbury 
the town authorities, becoming suspicious of the validity of the 
company's license, arrested the players, and notified the Privy 
Council. The names of the six players as enclosed with the letter 
from the Banbury officials to the Privy Council are: Bartholomew 
Jones, Richard Whiting, alias Richard Johnson, Edward Dam- 
port, Drewe Turner, Robert Houghton, and Richard Collewell. 
From the examination of the six men we learn that Bradshaw as 
their manager had gone a few days before to London to renew 
the commission and would join them a few days later with more 
players. And from the records it appears that Edward Whiting 
(jl-v.^ either had been or was in some way connected with Brad- 
shaw's troupe, and that he "let the commission in question to 
William Cooke and Fluellen Morgan, and they two went with 
it with a puppet-play until they had spent all, then they pawned 
the commission for 41." Subsequently Bradshaw redeemed and 
bought the commission (Murray, ii. 106-09, 163-67). 

55 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BRADSTREET, JOHN. 

John Bradstreet is named in a passport issued February lo, 1592., 
by the Lord Admiral, giving permission for a group of players 
under the leadership of Robert Browne to travel on the Continent 
(Cohn, p. xxix). He visited Arnhem, Netherlands, in 1592., with 
a license from Prince Maurice of Orange-Nassau (£/i:^. Stage, ii. 
Z74«.). In August, 1592., the company gave Gammer Gurtons 
Needle and some of Marlowe's plays at the Frankfort autumn fair. 
Again in 1593 and 1597 Bradstreet 's name appears in the Frank- 
fort records of English players at the fair (Herz, pp. 10, 11, 36), 
He seems to have remained for a long time in Germany, for his 
autograph, dated March X4, 1606, is found in an album of Johan- 
nes Cellarius of Nuremberg (Cohn, Shak. in Germany, Plate i, 
facsimile of autographs). He died in 1618 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 177). 

BRAMPTON, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 14x3 (Hillebrand, Mod. 
Phil., xviii. 2.35). 

BRANDE, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

BRAY, ANTONY. 

Antony Bray is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town (Murray, i. 179-80). 

BRETTEN, WILLIAM. 

A member of the Chapel Royal not later than 1546. Among 
the Documents Signed by Stamp in February, 1546, there is "A 
letter to the dean and chapter of Lichfelde to accept William 
Bretten, late one of the children of your Majesty's chapel, to be a 
singingman there" (Brewer, L. &. P. Henry VIII, xxi. i. p. 141). 

56 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BREW, ANTHONY. 

Anthony Brew appeared as "a Lord of Babilon with his sword 
drawn," and as a soldier, in Tbe Tivo Noble Ladies, as noted in 
margin of the Egerton MS. of the play (Boas, Library, 1917, viii. 
t-I'l). The play was "often tymes acted with approbation at the 
Red Bull in St. John's Streete by the company of the Revells" 
(Bullen, Old Plays, ii. 430), and is assigned by Fleay to i6i9-zi 
(Drama, ii. 334). Possibly he is to be identified with Anthony 
Brewer, author of The Lovesick King (ed. A. E. H. Swaen), a play 
that was published in 1655 but written probably about 1607 (cf. 
Eli^. Stage, iii. X37). 

BREWER, ANTHONY. 
See Anthony Brew. 

BRISTOW, JAMES. 

James Bristow was William Augusten's boy. On December 18, 
1597, Philip Henslowe bought him for £8. His wages due from 
A. JefFes to Henslowe were in arrears, August 8, 1600; and his 
wages from April X3, 1600, to February 15, 1601, were owing to 
Henslowe from the Admiral's men (H.D., i. 131, 134, toy). He 
may be the "Jemes" who appears as a witness on March xj, 1599. 
He probably acted with the Admiral's men in minor parts from 
1597 to i6ox. A "James" is recorded in the plots of The Battle of 
Alcazar (c. 1600-01), as Ruben and a page, and of i Tamar Cam 
{i6ox), as an Hermaphrodite in the procession (H.P., pp. 153, 
154); but Richard Jones also had a boy named James. He may 
fairly be identified with the "Jeames" mentioned together with 
Nicke in a letter from Joan Alleyn to her husband on October xi, 
1603 (Warner, p. 15). 

BROME, RICHARD. 

Richard Brome's name appears in a warrant of June 30, i6i8, 
appointing several members of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of 
Bohemia's) company as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahr- 

57 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

buch, xlvi. 94). He may perhaps be identified with the dramatist 
(A. Thaler, "Was Richard Brome an Actor?" M.L.N. , xxxvi. 88). 
That Brome the playwright was in some capacity apprenticed to 
Ben Jonson we learn from Jonson's prefatory verses to The North- 
ern Lass, published in i63z (Brome, Works, iii. p. ix): 

To my old Faithful Servant, and (by his continu d Vertue^ my 
loving Friend, the Author of this Work, Mr. Richard Brome. 

I had you for a Servant, once, Dick Brome; 
And you perform'd a Servants faithful parts, 
Now, you are got into a nearer room, 
Of Fellowship, professing my old Arts. 
And you do doe them well, with good applause. 
Which you have justly gained from the Stage, 
By observation of those Comick Lawes 
Which I, your Master, first did teach the Age. 
You learn'd it well, and for it serv'd your time 
A Prentice-ship: which few do now adays. 
Now each Court-Hobby-horse will wince in rime; 
Both learned and unlearned, all write Playes. 
It was not so of old: Men took up trades 
That knew the Crafts they had bin bred in right: 
An honest Bilbo-Smith would make good blades. 
And the Physician teach men spue, or shite; 
The Cobler kept him to his nail, but now 
He'll be a Pilot, scarce can guide ^ Plough. 

— Ben. Johnson. 

Brome's apprenticeship seems to have begun at least as early as 
1614, when the Lady Elizabeth's men acted Jonson's Bartholomeiv 
Fair, in which (Induction) the stage-keeper says: "I am looking, 
lest the Poet heare me, or his man. Master Broome, behind the 
Arras" (ed. C. S. Alden, p. 5). 

BROMEFILD, RICHARD. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
i6i8, Richard Bromefild was at Norwich on July 2. of the same 
year (Murray, ii. 103). 

58 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BROMEHAM. 

A member of the Children of Paul's at some date before I'^Si.. 
He appears as a legatee in the will of Sebastian Westcott, dated 
April 3, 1582., where he is named among the "sometimes children 
of the said almenerey," i.e. St. Paul's QEliz. Stage, ii. i5«.). 

BROMLEY, THOMAS. 

Thomas Bromley appears as joint-legatee with Mary Clarke, 
alias Wood, in the will, dated July ix, 1603, of Thomas Pope, 
w^ho left them his share in the Globe playhouse. Bromley was a 
minor. Basilius Nicoll, a scrivener, seems to have taken charge 
of Bromley's interest in the Globe (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 3 ff.). 

BROWNE. 

In October, 1596, Henslowe lent the Admiral's men 10s. "to 
feache browne" (H.D., ii. i46). The meaning of this phrase and 
the identity of Browne are moot questions. 

BROWNE, EDWARD. 

In March, 1584, the Earl of Worcester's players were engaged 
in a dispute with the authorities at Leicester. The account of this 
quarrel gives an abstract of the license of Worcester's men, dated 
January 14, 1583, in which Edward Browne is mentioned (Eli^i. 
Stage, ii. iix). On January Z5, 1599 (?), he appears as a witness 
with Henslowe and Charles Massey, which seems to indicate 
that he was at this date with the Admiral's men (H.D., i. 40). 
As an Admiral's man he played Crymm in the procession of 
I Tatnar Cam about October, i6ox (H.P., p. 154). He may possibly 
have been the "Browne of the Boares head," alluded to in a 
letter from Joan to Edward Alleyn on October xi, 1603, ^^ "dead, 
and dyed very poore" (Warner, p. %/\). If so, his widow may 
have married Thomas Greene, whose will (Fleay, Stage, p. i9x), 
dated July i5, i6ix, mentions several stepchildren by the name of 
Browne. "William Brawne, son of Edward, player," was bap- 
tized at St. Saviour's on October i, 1596 (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 
15, 19x8, p. 856). 

59 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BROWNE, HENRY. 

As Sir William Paston's man, Henry Browne joined John 
Bentley, of the Queen's men, in an affray at Norwich in 1583, 
and either he or Bentley fatally wounded the "man in the blue 
coat" (Halliwell-Phillipps, Illustrations, p. 118). He was pos- 
sibly only a servant and not an actor. 

BROWNE, JOHN. 

John Browne seems to have been a Court Interluder from 155 1 
to 1563. He is traceable in the records as receiving a salary of 
£3 Ss. 8d. and livery allowance of £1 3J-. 4^. a year. He died in 
1563 (^S.P.D. Edward VI, xiv. 40; Feuilierat, Edtv. & Mary, pp. 
86, i8o; Collier, i. 165; Murray, i. 3; Eliz- Stage, ii. 84). 

BROWNE, JOHN. 

On May 9, 1608, John Browne, "one of the playe boyes," was 
buried at St. Anne's QEliZ- Stage, ii. 55«.). He was probably one 
of the Children of the Revels. 

BROWNE, OLD. 

As an Admiral's man "old Browne" appeared as a Cannibal 
in the procession of 7 Tamar Cam about October, i6oi QH.P., 
p. 154). 

BROWNE, ROBERT. 

Robert Browne is named as a member of Worcester's troupe 
in the abstract of the license of January 14, 1583, in the Leicester 
records (^Eliz.- Stage, ii. xix). On January 3, 1589, he was con- 
cerned in a transfer to Edward Alleyn by Richard Jones of his 
share in a stock of theatrical goods held jointly with Edward 
and John Alleyn and Browne (H.P., p. 31). This conveyance 
seems to mark either a break-up of Worcester's men or an internal 
change in the organization of the Admiral's men, and thus there 
is some uncertainty as to whether Browne was at this date with 
the Worcester or the Admiral troupe. He soon became one of the 

60 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

most prominent of the English actors on the Continent, where 
he spent considerable periods of time between 1590 and 162.0. 
His career abroad began in October, 1590, with a visit to Leyden, 
Netherlands. Apparently his stay was only temporary, for he is 
named in a passport issued February 10, i59i, by the Lord Ad- 
miral, giving permission for a group of players to travel on the 
Continent (Cohn, pp. xxix, xxxi). He appeared at Arnhem, 
Netherlands, in 159^, with a license from Prince Maurice of 
Orange-Nassau (Eli'^. Stage, ii. 2.j/\n.~). In August, 1592., his com- 
pany gave Gammer Gurton's Needle and some of Marlowe's plays 
at the Frankfort autumn fair; and in 1593 he is named in the 
Frankfort records of English players at the fair (Herz, pp. 10, 
11). The company seems to have disbanded in 1593, and Browne 
is not traceable for a year or so either in Germany or in England. 
His wife, his children, and all his household died of the plague in 
Shoreditch about August, 1593 (H.P., p. 37); but he married 
again, and a son, Robert, and a daughter, Elizabeth, were bap- 
tized at St. Saviour's on October 19, 1595, and December 2., 1599, 
respectively (Elix,. Stage, ii. 304). In the course of time Browne 
came to Cassel, one of the literary courts of Germany, the capital 
of Maurice the Learned, Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel. Certainly he 
was the Landgrave's man by April 16, 1595, when a warrant was 
issued allowing the export of a consignment of bows and arrows 
for which he had been sent over to England (Cecil MSS., v. 174). 
Again in July, 1597, he was the agent in a similar transaction 
QS.P.D. Elizabeth, cclxiv. x^. He is named in an undated war- 
rant, probably about 1594-95, appointing him and his company 
to serve the Landgrave as players and musicians. In August, 1596, 
he and one John Webster were at Cassel, during the visit of the 
Earl of Lincoln, who came from England to stand proxy for 
Queen Elizabeth as godmother at the christening of the Land- 
grave's daughter. In 1598 he and his company left Cassel for the 
court of Frederick IV at Heidelberg, and toward the end of 1599 
proceeded to Frankfort and Strassburg (Herz, pp. 13, 14, 16). 

61 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

The company on its arrival at Strassburg was under his leader- 
ship, but soon he seems to have left them and returned to England. 
During the winters of 15 99-1 600 and 1600-01 he appears as payee 
for the Earl of Derby's men when they performed at Court 
(Steele, pp. 119, lii). Subsequently he returned to Germany, 
for he was in Frankfort at Easter, 1601. From 1601 to 1607 he was 
in Germany (Herz, pp. 17-19). We find his appearance recorded 
at Frankfort in September, 1602.; at Augsburg in the following 
November and December; at Nuremberg in February, 1603; at 
Frankfort for the Easter fair of 1603; at Frankfort in May, 1606; 
and at Strassburg in the following June. About this time he and 
his company seem to have come under the patronage of Maurice 
of Hesse, for they came to Frankfort in August, 1606, as the 
Hessian Comedians. During the following winter he settled at 
Cassel, but for only a short time. On March i, 1607, one of the 
Landgrave's officers reported that the players found their salaries 
inadequate and declared they would leave. On March 17 he went 
to Frankfort for the last time as a member of the Hessian troupe 
(Herz, p. 2.6). His name now disappears from German records for 
a decade. William Sly in his will dated August 4, 1608, bequeathed 
"his part of the Globe" to Robert Browne, mentioned Browne's 
daughter, Jane, and his wife, Sisely, whom he appointed as 
executrix (Collier, Actors, p. 157). This may be the actor and his 
family. On January 4, 1610, Browne is named as one of the 
patentees of the Children of the Queen's Revels company at 
Whitefriars (Adams, Playhouses, p. 318). On April 11, i6iz, he 
wrote to Edward Alleyn from Clerkenwell, requesting him to 
secure for the wife of one Rose, a member of Prince Henry's 
troupe, a position as gatherer (H.P., p. 63). In 1618 he again 
went to Germany as the leader of a company of players. On May 
2.8, 1618, he is noted at Nuremberg; in June and July, 1618, at 
Strassburg; for the autumn fair of the same year at Frankfort; 
and in October, 1619, at Cologne (Herz, pp. 1.1 ff.). He wintered 
at Prague, the court of the King and Queen of Bohemia. The last 

6i 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

notices of him are his visits to Nuremberg in February and to 
Frankfort fori;he Easter fair of 162.0 (Herz, p. x}). Possibly he is 
to be identified with a Robert Browne who was traveling as a 
puppet-showman in the English provinces during 1638-39 
(Murray, ii. t^t,, 359). 

BROWNE, WILLIAM. 

William Browne is named in the will of Thomas Greene, July 
2.5, 1612.; at that date he was not twenty-one years of age. He 
was the son of Susan Baskervile, Greene's widow, formerly wife 
of one Browne. About 161 6-17, when his wages were in arrears, 
he was playing with Queen Anne's company as a| hired man. The 
occurrence of his name in the Baskervile documents sheds ilo 
further light on his theatrical career (Fleay, Stage, pp. i9X ff., 
i7off.);and wehear nomoreof himuntilBecember, 163 1 (Adams, 
Dram. Rec, p. 45), when he played Philautus, a lord enamored of 
himself, in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, presented by "the high 
and mighty Prince Charles his servants, at the private house in 
Salisbury Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. t., 6). His name appears 
in a warrant of May 10, 1631, appointing several of Prince 
Charles's men as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 96). 

BRYAN, GEORGE. 

During 1586-87 George Bryan was on the Continent. The 
Elsinore pay-roll shows that he was in the Danish service from 
June 17 to September 18, 1586. Soon he went to the Court of the 
Elector of Saxony at Dresden, Germany, where he held an ap- 
pointment as actor-entertainer until July 17, 1587 (Cohn, Shak. 
in Ger., pp. xxiii-xxvii; J. A. Riis, Century Magazine, Ixi. 391; 
Herz, p. 3). In 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Strange's company 
about 1590, he played Warwick in the Induction and Damascus 
in "Envy" (Greg, H.P., p. 15^; R.E.S., i. z6x). He is named in 
the traveling license granted by the Privy Council to Strange's 
men on May 6, 1593 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 1x3). Subsequently he joined 

63 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the Chamberlain's men, presumably when the troupe was organ- 
ized in 1594, and on December xi, 1596, served as payee with 
Heminges for a performance at Court by this company (Steele, 
p. no). His name occurs in the 16x3 folio list of actors in Shake- 
speare's plays. He is mentioned in neither the 1598 list of players 
in Every Man in his Humor nor later records of the Chamberlain's 
or King's men. Possibly he left the stage to become an ordinary 
groom of the Chamber, which office he held in 1603 and 1611-13 
(Eliz.. Stage, ii. 304). His son, George, was baptized at St. An- 
drew's on February 17, 1600 (Collier, iii. 364). 

BRYAN, MARY. 

A joint-lessee of the Fortune playhouse, in which she obtained 
a whole share on March 14, 162.4 (Warner, p. X47). 

BUCKE, PAUL. 

The registers of St. Anne's record the burial of two children of 
Paul Bucke, a player: a daughter, Sara, July Z3, 1580, and a 
bastard son, Paul, July X3, 1599 (^Elix.. Stage, ii. 304). Probably 
he may be identified with the Paul Bucke whose name appears 
for some unknown reason at the end of Wilson's Three Ladies of 
London (1584). "Paule Buckes praier for Sir Humfrey Gilberte" 
was entered in the Stationers' Registers on July 17, 1578 (Arber, 

ii- 333)- 

BUCKEREDGE, EDWARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. in). 

BUGBY,JOHN. 

Grammar Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal in 1401 
(^Eli^. Stage, ii. 14^.). 

BUKLANK, ALEXANDER. 

Alexander Buklank is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December 2.7, 162.4, to twenty-one men "imployed 

64 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

BULL, JOHN. 

A note by Anthony Wood suggests that John Bull joined the 
Chapel Royal about I'yjx (D.N.B., vii. 2.39). In January, 1586, 
he was sworn in as a Gentleman of the Chapel (Hillebrand, 
Mod. Phil., xviii. X54). He later became famous as a musician. 

BULL, THOMAS. 

Thomas Bull was with a troupe of English players at the 
Danish court during 1579-80 (Bolte, Jahrbuch, xxiii. 99). 

BURBAGE, CUTHBERT. 

Cuthbert Burbage, the elder son of James Burbage, was pro- 
prietor of the Theatre and largely responsible for the erection of 
the Globe (Adams, Playhouses^. He was not an actor, but during 
the greater part of his life was an active leader in theatrical 
affairs. In a deposition of February 16, 15 91, he is described as 
servant to Walter Cope, who was gentleman usher to Lord 
Burghley, and as about twenty-four years of age (Wallace, 
N.U.S., xiii. 59); hence 1566-67 may be taken as the approximate 
year of his birth. The subsidy rolls for 1597 give his address as 
Halliwell Street, where he was assessed at 10s. 8d. (Stopes, 
Burbage, p. 195). The registers of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, 
record the following children: Walter, baptized June 2.1., 1595; 
James, buried July 15, 1597; and Elizabeth, baptized December 
30, 1601 (^Eliz.. Stage, ii. 306). Cuthbert was buried at St. Leonard's 
on September 17, 1636, and his widow, Elizabeth, was buried on 
October i of the same year (Stopes, Burbage, p. 133). That he was 
in close friendship with members of the King's company is shown 
by the testimonies of esteem in the wills of William Sly (1608), 
Richard Cowley (1618), and Nicholas Tooley (16^3), the last of 
whom died at Burbage's house. / 

65 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

BURBAGE, JAMES. 

James Burbage, the father of Cuthbert and Richard, was the 
man who first realized that profit could be made from a play- 
house, and had the courage to put his savings into the venture. 
He was about sixty years of age on February i6, 15 91, and was 
therefore born in 1530-31 (Wallace, N.U.S., xiii. 61). He was 
"a por man and but of small credit being by occupacion a joyner 
and reaping but a small lyving by the same gave it over and be- 
came a commen player in playes" (Wallace, Ibid., p. 141). As an 
actor he was more successful, for as early as i'^jt. we find him at 
the head of Leicester's excellent troupe. As one of the Earl of 
Leicester's men in I'^ji. he signed a letter addressed to the Earl 
requesting his continued patronage, and he is named in the 
license granted to Leicester's players on May 10, 1574 (^M.S.C, 
i. i.6x, 348). The hostility of the authorities of London toward 
the drama, the unsatisfactory arrangements in the inn-yards, and 
the idea that "continual great profit" could be had from a build- 
ing devoted solely to the drama, led Burbage in 1575 to resolve 
upon erecting a playhouse. He thus became a pioneer in a new 
field of business speculation. About this time he was not worth 
above a hundred marks, but fortunately had a wealthy brother- 
in-law, John Brayne, who was also interested in the novel under- 
taking as a money-making enterprise. His theatrical affairs are 
thereafter bound up with the history of the Theatre, which was 
doubtless used for dramatic performances in the autumn of 1576, 
and of the Second Blackfriars, which he planned during the last 
years of his life (Adams, Playhouses, pp. xj ff., 48, 182.)- He seems 
to have settled in Shoreditch about 1576, for entries of his family 
then begin in the registers of St. Leonard's, where two daughters 
are recorded: Alice, baptized March 17, 1576, and Joane, buried 
August 18, i58i(Stopes, Burbage, pp. 139, 140). Another daughter, 
Helen, was buried at St. Anne's, Blackfriars, on December 15, 
1595 QEliZ- Stage, ii. 306). His two sons, Cuthbert and Richard, 
were born before 1576, and hence are not recorded in the registers 

66 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

of St. Leonard's. Burbage was buried at Shoreditch on February 
z, 1597, and his widow, Helen, John Brayne's sister, was buried 
there on May 8, 1613 (Stopes, Burbage, p. 139). The registers 
generally give the family residence as Halliwell Street. At his 
death he left the Theatre to his elder son Cuthbert and the 
Blackfriars to his younger son Richard (Adams, Playhouses, p. 
199). Cuthbert spoke of his father as "the first builder of play- 
howses, and was himselfe in his younger yeeres a player" (Halli- 
well-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 317). He was described as "joyner" in 
the lease of the Theatre site in 1576, but in later years usually as 
"yeoman" or "gentleman." The proceedings of the lawsuits 
represent him as a man of vehement temper and strong language. 
And in a letter of June 18, 1584, from William Fleetwood to 
Lord Burghley, he is referred to as "a stubburne fellow" (Eliz.. 
Stage, iv. ^98). 

BURBAGE, RICHARD. 

Richard Burbage, the younger son of James Burbage, enters 
theatrical annals in rather dramatic fashion in a brawl at the 
Theatre, which came as a result of the Chancery Order Of Novem- 
ber 13, 1590, restoring a moiety of the profits of the playhouse to 
John Brayne's widow. The widow, with her adjutant Robert 
Myles, his son Ralph, and his business partner, Nicholas Bishop, 
went "to the Theatre upon a play-day to stand at the door that 
goeth up to the galleries of the said Theatre to take and receive 
for the use of the said Margaret half of the money that should be 
given to come up into the said gallery." In the Theatre they were 
met by Richard Burbage, then about nineteen years old, and his 
mother, who "fell upon the said Robert Myles and beat him 
with a broom stafif, calling him murdering knave." When Myles's 
partner. Bishop, ventured to protest at this contemptuous treat- 
ment of the order of the court, "the said Richard Burbage," so 
Bishop deposed, "scornfully and disdainfully playing with this 
deponent's nose, said that if he dealt in the matter, he would 

67 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

beat him also, and did challenge the field of him at that time." 
One of the actors then coming in, John Alleyn — brother of the 
immortal Edward Alleyn — "found the foresaid Richard Burbage, 
the youngest son of the said James Burbage, there with a broom 
staff in his hand; of whom when this deponent Alleyn asked what 
stir was there, he answered in laughing phrase how they came for 
a moiety, 'But,' quod he (holding up the said broom staff) 'I 
have, I think, delivered him a moiety with this, and sent them 
packing.' " Alleyn thereupon warned the Burbages that Myles 
could bring an action of assault and battery against them. 
'Tush,' quod the father, 'no, I warrant you; but where my son 
hath now beat him hence, my sons, if they will be ruled by me, 
shall at their next coming provide charged pistols, with powder 
and hempseed, to shoot them in the legs' " (Adams, Playhouses, 
pp. 57fF.). Richard was probably playing with the Admiral's 
men at the Theatre in November, 1590. His exact age is unknown, 
but he was younger than Cuthbert, who was born about 1566-67. 
Richard's histrionic career probably began as early as 1584, for 
in 1619 Cuthbert spoke of his brother, "who for thirty-five yeeres 
paines, cost and labour, made meanes to leave his wife and 
children some estate" (Halliwell-Phillips, Outlines, i. 317). Be- 
cause of conjectural dates and incomplete records, the early years 
of his dramatic career are clouded by uncertainty. He appeared 
as a messenger in The Dead Mans Fortune, possibly acted by the 
Admiral's men at the Theatre abou. ^59° QEli^. Stage, ii. 115, 
136). In 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Lord Strange's com- 
pany about 1590, he played Gorboduc in "Envy" and Tereus in 
"Lechery" (Greg, H.P., p. i5x; R.E.S., i. 2.6x). For a time there 
was an amalgamation of the troupes under the patronage of Lord 
Strange and the Lord Admiral at the Rose. The playhouses were 
closed on account of the plague in February, 1593, and the com- 
pany at the Rose was given permission to travel in the provinces. 
But Burbage's name does not appear in the traveling license. 
However, when the companies separated in 1594, and the Cham- 

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A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

berlain's company was formed, Burbage joined the new company 
and became its most prominent member. On March 15, 1595, he 
appears as joint-payee with William Kempe and William Shake- 
speare for plays given by the Chamberlain's men at Court in 
December, 1594 (Steele, pp. 107, 108). As a member of the Cham- 
berlain's troupe he had parts in two of Jonson's plays: Every Man 
in his Humor (1598) and Every M.an out of his Humor (1599)- In 1603 
the Chamberlain's company passed under royal patronage, and 
Burbage is named in the patent granted on May 19, 1603, to the 
King's men. He remained with this company until his death in 
1 619. His name appears in the 162.3 folio list of actors in Shake- 
speare's plays; in the procession list of March 15, 1604; in the 
warrant of March ^9, 161 5, to appear before the Privy Council 
for playing during Lent; and in the patent of March ir/, 161 9, 
although he died on March 13. His relations with his fellows are 
reflected in the wills of Augustine Phillips (1605), by whom 
he is named as an executor; of William Shakespeare (161 6), who 
bequeathed to him a memorial ring; and of Nicholas Tooley 
(16x3), who left £19 13 J. to Sara Burbage, daughter of his "late 
master." His father, who died in 1597, had left Blackfriars to him 
(Adams, Playhouses, p. 199). Of the eight shares in the Globe, 
after the retirement of Kempe in 1599, Richard and Cuthbert 
owned two shares each (Adams, Ibid., pp. 140-41). The two 
brothers continued to live as close neighbors in Halliwell Street, 
Shoreditch, where their houses were robbed on the night of 
February 19, 1615 (Jeaffreson, Middlesex, ii. 108). The registers 
contain the following records relating to Richard's children 
(Stopes, Burbage, pp. 139-41): Julia or Juliet, baptized January x, 
1603, buried September 12., 1608; Frances, baptized September 16 
and buried September 19, 1604; Anne, baptized August 8, 1607; 
Richard, buried August 16, 1607; Winifred, baptized October 10, 
1613, buried October 14, 1616; a second Julia, baptized December 
X7, 1614, buried August 15, 1615; William, baptized November 
6, 1616; and a posthumous Sara, baptized August 5, 1619, buried 

69 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

April X9, 16x5. Richard Burbage was himself buried on March 16, 
1 619. His nuncupative will, dated March li, the day before his 
death, was witnessed by his brother, and by Nicholas Tooley and 
Richard Robinson of the King's men. He left his wife, Winifred, 
sole executrix (Collier, Actors, p. 45). She subsequently married 
Richard Robinson, and was still alive, as was Burbage's son, 
William, in 1635 (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 8; Halliwell-Phillipps, 
Outlines, i. 313, 317). According to contemporary gossip, he left 
"better than £300 land" to his heirs (Collier, Actors, p. 49). He 
is known from the actor-lists to have assumed parts in the follow- 
ing plays acted by the King's men (Murray, i. opp. 171): Sejanus 
(1603); Volpone (1605); The Alchemist (1610); Catiline (1611); 
The Duchess of Malfi (c. 1611), in which he acted Ferdinand; 
The Captain (c. i6iz); Valentinian (c. 1611-14); Bonduca (c. 1613- 
14); The Queen of Corinth (c. 1617); The Knight of Malta (c. 1618); 
The Mad Lover (c. 161 8); and The Loyal Subject (161 8). On May 31, 
1618, he and his fellow, John Rice, took part in a pageant on the 
Thames in honor of the creation of Prince Henry as Prince of 
Wales. He represented Amphion, "a graue and iudicious Prophet- 
like personage, attyred in his apte habits, euery way answerable 
to his state and profession, with his wreathe of Sea-shelles on 
his head, and his harpe hanging in fayre twine before him, 
personating the Genius of Wales" (Wallace, London Times, 
March x8, 1913, p. 6). In addition to the notices in the plots and 
actor-lists, we learn from the scattered allusions given below 
that Burbage played Jeronimo, Richard III, Malevole, Hamlet, 
Lear, and Othello. Collier QActors, pp. 19 fF., 5Z fF.) lists many 
other parts supposedly played by Burbage, but his authority is 
the third version of the epitaph (vide infra'), which is now re- 
garded as a forgery. 

There have come down to us many testimonies to the histrionic 
skill of Burbage. His fame as an actor made him the natural rival 
of Edward Alleyn, and he was recognized as the most distin- 
guished member of his company. By virtue of his wonderful 

70 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

power in the presentation of heroic character he won the esteem 
of his contemporaries and of later generations of playgoers. He 
and Kempe are introduced in propria persona into 2 Return from 
Parnasus (i6oi), a Cambridge University play (ed. Arber, pp. 
58-60): 

Studioso. Welcome M. Kempe from dancing the morrice ouer 
the Alpes. 

Kempe. Well you merry knaues you may come to the honor 
of it one day, is it not better to make a foole of the world as I 
haue done, then to be fooled of the world, as you schollers are? 
But be merry my lads, you haue happened vpon the most excellent 
vocation in the world for money : they come North and South to 
bring it to our playhouse, and for honours, who of more report, 
then Dick Burbage and Will: Kempe, he is not counted a Gentleman, 
that knowes not Dick Burbage and Wil Kemp, there's not a 
country wench than can dance Sellengers Round but can talke of 
Dick Burbage and Will Kempe. . 

Burbage. M. Stud. I pray you take some part in this booke and 
act it, that I may see what will fit you best, I thinke your voice 
would serue for Hieronimo, obserue how I act it and then Imitate 
mee. 

Studioso. Who calls Hieronimo from his naked bed? 
And, etc. . . . 

Burbage. I like your face, and the proportion of your body for 
Richard the 3. I pray M. Phil, let me see you act a little of it. 

Philomusus. Now is the winter of our discontent. 

Made glorious summer by the sonne of Yorke. 

Burbage. Very well I assure you, well M. Phil, and M. Stud. 
wee see what ability you are of: I pray walke with vs to our 
fellows, and weele agree presently. 

Philomusus. We will follow you straight M. Burbage. 

Kempe. Its good manners to follow vs, Maister Phil, and 
Maister Otioso. 

Also in the Induction to Marston's Malcontent (1604), Burbage, 
who acted Malevole, appears with his fellows of the King's men: 
"Enter D. Burbadge, H. Condell, and J. Lowin" (Marston, Works, 
i. X0I-05). A note of March 13, i6ox, by John Manningham 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Diary, p. 39) records how Burbage's impersonation of Richard 
III touched the heart of a citizen's wife, and how Shakespeare 
anticipated him at a resultant assignation: 

Vpon a tyme when Burbidge played Richard III there was a 
citizen grone soe farr in liking with him, that before shee went 
from the play shee appointed him to come that night vnto hir 
by the name of Richard the Third. Shakespeare ouerhearing their 
conclusion went before, was intertained and at his game ere 
Burbidge came. Then message being brought that Richard the 
Third was at the dore, Shakespeare caused returne to be made 
that William the Conqueror was before Richard the Third. 
Shakespeare's name William. 

John Davies of Hereford mentions him with Shakespeare in 
Mkrocosmos (1603), among players whom he loved "for painting, 
poesie" (Works, i. 8x). His acting of Hamlet is doubtless alluded 
to in Ratseis Ghost (1605) by Gamaliell Ratsey, who met a com- 
pany of players at a provincial inn (Halliwell-Phillipps, Out- 
lines, i. 32.6): 

And for you, sirra, sales hee to the chiefest of them, thou hast 
a good presence upon a stage; methinks thou darkenest thy 
merite by playing in the country. Get thee to London, for, if one 
man were dead, they will have much neede of such a one as thou 
art. There would be none in my opinion fitter then thyselfe to 
play his parts. My conceipt is such of thee, that I durst venture 
all the money in my purse on thy head to play Hamlet with him 
for a wager. 

John Davies of Hereford again couples him with Shakespeare in 
Humours Heauen on Earth (1609), among those whom Fortune 
"guerdond not, to their desarts" (Works, i. 37). Jonson com- 
pliments him in Bartholomew Fair (1614), V. iii. (Works, iv. 482.): 

Cokes. Which is your Burbage now? 
Leatherhead. What mean you by that, sir? 
Cokes. Your best actor, your Field? 

The allusion to painting suggests that Burbage was the model 
for "An Excellent Actor" in the Characters (1614) by Thomas 
Overbury and others (Overbury, Works, ed. Rimbault, p. 148): 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

He is much affected to painting, and 'tis a question whether 
that make him an excellent player, or his playing an exquisite 
painter. ... I observe, of all men living, a worthy actor in 
one kinde is the strongest motive of affection that can be: for 
when hee dyes, wee cannot be perswaded any man can doe his 
parts like him. But to conclude, I value a worthy actor by the 
corruption of some few of the quality, as I would doe gold in 
the oare; I should not mind the drosse, but the purity of the metall. 

In Jonson's Masque of Christmas (1616), Venus, a deaf tire-woman, 
says (Works, vii. 2.63): "Master Burbage has been about and 
about with me, and so has old Master Hemings too." In a letter 
of July 17, 1617, John Chamberlain writes to Dudley Carleton: 
"The Lord Coke and his lady hath great wars at the council- 
table . . . she . . . declaimed bitterly against him, and so 
carried herself, that divers said Burbage could not have acted 
better" (Birch, Court and Times of James I, ii. 2.6). Shortly after 
Burbage' s death the Earl of Pembroke wrote from Whitehall on 
May io, 1619, to the Earl of Carlisle, ambassador to Germany: 
' 'My Lord Lenox made a great supper to the French Ambassador 
this night here and even now all the Company are at the play, 
which I being tender-harted could not endure to see so soone 
after the loss of my old acquaintance Burbadg" (Scott, Athenaum, 
January ii, i88i, p. 103). His death on March 13, 1619, called 
forth an outburst of eulogy and sorrow that surpassed the grief 
for Queen Anne, whose death had occurred on March x. The city 
and the stage were shrouded in gloom. Several elegies and epitaphs 
upon Burbage are preserved. The shortest is merely "Exit Bur- 
bidge," printed 1674 ^^ Camden's Remains Concerning Britain (edit. 
1870, p. 433). Another is by Middleton (Works, vii. 413): 

On the death of that great master in his art and quality, 
painting and -playing, R. Burbage 

Astronomers and star-gazers this year 
Write but of four eclipses; five appear. 
Death interposing Burbage; and their staying 
Hath made a visible eclipse of playing. 

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A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

A third elegy (having eighty-two, eighty-six, or one hundred 
and twenty-four lines, according to the particular version) has 
been the subject of much controversy. Of the three versions, the 
first two are generally taken to be genuine, the four extra lines 
of the second having probably been omitted from the first only 
by accident. The third version of one hundred and twenty-four 
lines is now thought to be spurious, for the interpolation at- 
tributes to Burbage parts in plays which belonged to other com- 
panies than the King's. I cite below the version of eighty-six 
lines (Ingleby, "The Elegy on Burbadge," in Shakespeare, the 
Man and the Book, ii. i8o}: 

A Funerall Elegy e on ye Death of the famous Actor Richard Burbedg 
who dyed on Saturday in Lent the i} of Nlarch 1618 

Some skilful Limner helpe me, if not soe 

Some sadd Tragedian helpe t'expres my woe 

But oh he's gone, that could both best; both Lime 

And Act my greife; and tis for only him 

That I inuoake this strange Assistance to itt 

And on the point inuoake himselfe to doe itt. 

For none butt Tully, Tullyes praise can tell. 

And as he could, no man could act soe well. 

This part of sorrow for him, no man drawe, 

Soe trewly to the life, this Mapp of woee 

That greifes trew picture, which his loss hath bred 

Hee's gone and with him what a world are dead. 

Which he reuiu'd, to be reuiued soe, 

No more young Hamlett, ould Heironymoe 

Kind Leer, the Greued Moore, and more beside. 

That liued in him; have now for ever dy'de, 

Oft haue I scene him, leap into the Graue 

Suiting the person, which he seem'd to haue 

Of a sadd Louer, with soe true an Eye 

That theer I would haue sworne, he meant to dye. 

Oft haue I seene him, play this part in ieast, 

Soe liuly, that Spectators, and the rest 

Of his sad Crew, whilst he but seem'd to bleed. 

Amazed, thought euen then hee dyed in deed, 

74 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

O lett not me be checkt, and I shall sweare 

Euen yett, it is a false report I heare. 

And thinke that he, that did soe truly faine 

Is still but Dead in least, to Hue againe. 

But now this part, he Acts, not playes, tis knowne 

Other he plaide, but Acted hath his owne 

Englands great Roscious, for what Roscious, 

Was unto Roome, that Burbadg was to us. 

How did his speech become him, and his pace. 

Suite with his speech, and euery action grace 

Them both alike, whilst not a woord did fall. 

Without just weight, to ballast itt with all, 

Hadst thou but spoake to death, and us'd thy power 

Of thy Inchaunting toung, att that first hower 

Of his assault, he had Lett fall his Dart 

And quite been Charmed, by thy all Charming Art. 

This he well knew, and to preuent this wronge 

He therefore first made seisure on his tounge. 

Then on the rest, 'twas easy by degrees 

The slender Ii^y tops the smallest trees. 

Poets whose glory whilome twas to heare 

Your lines so well exprest, henceforth forbeare. 

And write no more, or if you doe let 't bee 

In Commike sceans, since Tragick parts you see, 

Dy all with him; nay rather sluce your eyes 

And hence forth write nought els but Tragedyes, 

Or Dirges, or sad Ellegies or those 

Mournfull Laments that nott accord with prose, 

Blurr all your Leans with blotts, that all you writt 

May be but one sadd black, and open it 

Draw Marble lines that may outlast ye sunn 

And stand like Trophyes, when the world is done 

Turne all your inke to blood, your pens to speares 

To pearce and wound the hearers harts and Eares, 

Enrag'd, write stabbing Lines that euery woord 

May be as apt for murther as a swoord 

That no man may suruiue after this fact 

Of ruthless death, eyther to heare or Act 

And you his sad Compannions to whome Lent' 

Becomes more Lenton by this Accident, 

Hence forth your waning flagg, no more hang out 

75 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Play now no more att all, when round aboute 

Wee looke and miss the Atlas of your spheare 

What comfort haue wee (thinke you) to bee theer 

And how can you delight in playing, when 

Such mourning soe affecteth other men, 

Or if you will still putt 't out lett it weere 

No more light cullors, but death liuery there 

Hang all your house with black, the Ewe it bears 

With Iseckls of euer melting teares, 

And if you euer chance to play agen 

May nought but Tragedyes afflict your sceane 

And thou deare Earth that must enshrine that dust 

By Heauen now committed to thy trust 

Keepe itt as pretious as ye richest Mine 

That Lyes intomb'd, in that rich womb of thine. 

That after times may know that much lou'd mould 

From other dust, and cherrish it as gould. 

On it be laide some soft but lasting stone 

With this short Epitaph endorst thereon 

That euery Eye may reade, and reading weepe 
Tis Englands Roscious, Burbadg that I keepe. 

In Sloane MS. 1786 appears the following epitaph (Stopes, Burbage, 
p. 118): 

An epitaph upon Mr. Richard Burbage, the player 

This Life's a play, sceaned out by Nature's Arte, 
Where every man hath his allotted parte. 
This man hath now (as many men can tell) 
Ended his part, and he hath acted well 
The Play now ended, think his grave to be 
The retiring house of his sad Tragedie, 
Where to give his fame this, be not afraid. 
Here lies the best Tragedian ever played. 

Burbage was famous not only as an actor but as a painter. Be- 
sides the above scattered allusions to his skill in painting, the 
accounts of the Earl of Rutland for the tilt of 1613 contain the 
entry: "31 Martii, to Mr. Shakespeare in gold about my Lorde's 
impreso, ^^s.\ to Richard Burbage for paynting and making yt, 

76 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in gold 44J."; and those for the tilt of 1616 record: "i5 March. 
Paid given Richard Burbidg for my Lorde's shelde and for the 
embleance, £4 i8j-." (Rutland MSS., iv. 494, 508). There is in the 
gallery at Dulwich a picture presented by William Cartwright, 
which is described as "A woman's head, on a board, done by 
'Mr Burbige, ye actor'; in an old gilt frame" (Warner, p. ^05). 
In the same collection there is also a portrait of Burbage; " 'Mr 
Burbig' his head; in a gilt frame; a small closet piece" (Warner, 
p. Z05; reproduced in Adams, Playhouses, opp. p. ^34). Evidence 
of his fame as Richard III is given in Richard Corbet's Iter Boreale 
(1647), where an old "host," described as "full of ale and his- 
tory," is acting as a guide to visitors on the battlefield of Bos- 
worth (Chalmers, English Poets, v. 580): 

Why, he could tell 
The inch where Richmond stood, where Richard fell: 
Besides what of his knowledge he could say. 
He had authenticke notice from the play; 
Which I might guesse, by 's mustring up the ghost, 
And policyes, not incident to hosts; 
But chiefly by that one perspicuous thing, 
Where he mistooke a player for a king. 
For when he would have sayd, "King Richard dyed. 
And call'd— A horse! a horse!" — he, "Burbidge" cry'de. 

Richard Baker praises him in his Theatrum Redivivum (i6zi), p. 
34: "And what scurrility was ever heard to come from the best 
Actours of our Time, Allen, and Bourbidge? yet, what Plays were 
ever so pleasing, as where their Parts had the greatest part?" 
(Notes and Queries, 1880, i. 113). Baker also mentions him in his 
Chronicle (edit. 1674, p. 500): "Richard Bourbidge and Edward Allen, 
two such Actors as no age must ever look to see the like." 
Richard Flecknoe in his Discourse of the English Stage (1664) 
writes (Spingarn, Critical Essays of the Seventeenth Century, ii. 94): 

It was the happiness of the Actors of those Times to have such 
Poets as these to instruct them and write for them; and no less 
of those Poets, to have such docile and excellent Actors to Act 

77 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

their Playes, as a Field and Burbidge, of whom we may say that 
he was a delightful Proteus, so wholly transforming himself into 
his Part, and putting off himself with his Cloathes, as he never 
(not so much as in the Tyring-house) assum'd himself again until 
the Play was done; there being as much difference betwixt him 
and one of our common Actors, as between a Ballad-singer who 
onely mouths it, and an excellent singer, who knows all his 
Graces, and can artfully vary and modulate his Voice, even to 
know how much breath he is to give to every syllable. He had 
all the parts of an excellent Orator, animating his words with 
speaking, and Speech with Action; his Auditors being never 
more delighted then when he spake, nor more sorry then when he 
held his peace; yet even then he was an excellent Actor still, 
never falling in his Part when he had done speaking, but with his 
looks and gestures maintaining it still unto the heighth, he 
imagining Age quod agis onely spoke to him: so as those who call 
him a Player do him wrong, no man being less idle then he was 
whose whole life is nothing else but action; with only this differ- 
ence from other mens, that as what is but a Play to them is his 
Business, so their business is but a play to him. 

In Flecknoe's Euterpe Restored (167^) we find (Collier, iii. 179): 

The Praises of Richard Burbage 

Who did appear so gracefully on the stage. 

He was the admir'd example of the age. 

And so observed all your dramatic laws, 

He ne'er went off the stage but with applause; 

Who his spectators and his auditors 

Led in such silent chains of eyes and ears, 

As none, whilst he on the stage his part did play. 

Had power to speak, or look another way. 

Who a delightful Proteus was, and could 

Transform himself into what shape he would; 

And of an excellent orator had all. 

In voice and gesture, we delightful call: 

Who was the soul of the stage; and we may say 

'Twas only he who gave life unto a play; 

Which was but dead, as 'twas by the author writ, 

Till he by action animated it: 

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A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

And finally he did on the stage appear 

Beauty to the eye, and music to the ear. 

Such even the nicest critics must allow 

Burbage was once; and such Charles Hart is now. 

A more recent tribute, "When Burbadge Played," is given by 
Austin Dobson in his Collected Poems (1898). 

BURDE, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

BURDE, SIMON. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

BURGES, ROBERT. 

A player who was buried at St. Bennet's, Gracechurch, on 
April 14, 1559 (Elii. Stage, ii. 310). 

BURNETT, HENRY. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. Hi). 

BURT, NICHOLAS. 

From Wright's Historia Histrionica (1699) we learn that 
Nicholas Burt "was a boy, first under Shank at the Blackfriars, 
then under Beeston at the Cockpit," where he "used to play the 
principal women's parts, in particular Clariana in Love's Cruelty" 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 404, 409-10). The date at which he joined 
the King's men at Blackfriars is unknown, but John Shank died 
in January, 1636. The King and Queen's company, popularly 
known as Beeston's Boys, was organized early in 1637, and oc- 
cupied the Cockpit. Burt possibly joined the new company in 
1637. At the closing of the playhouses in 1641 and the beginning 
of the Civil War, he enlisted in the King's army as cornet in 
Prince Rupert's regiment. In the winter of 1648 a number of 

79 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

players who survived the war formed a company and ventured 
to act cautiously at the Cockpit. During a presentation of Rollo, 
or The Bloody Brof her, in which Burt assumed the part of Latorch, a 
group of soldiers plundered the playhouse and routed the players. 
Burt continued his theatrical career at the Cockpit after the 
Restoration. He signed the Submission of Players to Herbert's 
Authority on August 14, 1660, and the Petition of the Cockpit 
Players on October 13 of the same year; and he is named in the 
Articles of Agreement between Herbert and Killigrew on June 4, 
i66'x (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 85, 94, 96, 1 13-14). Davies (Dram. 
Misc., i. 1x4) writes: "After the Restoration, Hart represented 
Hotspur, Burt the Prince of Wales, and Wintershul the King [in 
/ Henry IK]. The excellency of Hart is universally acknowledged; 
of Burt we can only transcribe what Downes has recorded. He 
ranks him in the list of good actors, with Shotterel and Cart- 
wright, but without any discriminating marks. That he was not 
a man of superior merit we may gather from his being obliged to 
resign the part of Othello to Hart, who had formerly acted 
Cassio when Burt played the principal character." Samuel Pepys 
gives several notices of Burt. On October 11, 1660, he saw him 
as Othello (Diary, i. X4i): "To the Cockpit to see The Moore of 
Venice, which was well done. Burt acted the Moore." On Sep- 
tember Z4, i66x, Pepys went "to Mr. Wotton, the shoemaker's, 
and there bought a pair of boots, cost me 30J., and he told me 
how Bird ["Lord Braybrooke says that this was a mistake for 
Nicholas Burt" (Diary, ii. 3x3^.)] hath lately broke his leg, 
while he was fencing in Aglaura, upon the stage" (Diary, ii. 32.3). 
On December 11, 1667, Pepys was at Westminster Hall, where he 
"met Rolt and Sir John Chichly, and Harris, the player, and 
there we talked of many things, and particularly of Catiline, 
which is to be suddenly acted at the King's house; and they all 
agree that it cannot be well done at that house, there not being 
good actors enow: and Burt acts Cicero, which they all conclude 
he will not be able to do well" (Diary, vii. zxi). Again on Feb- 

80 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ruary 6, 1669, Pepys saw Burt in the part of Othello, this time 
without being so well pleased as formerly: "After dinner to 
the King's playhouse, and there . . . did see The Moor of 
Venice: but ill acted in most parts; Mohun, which did a little 
surprise me, not acting lago's part by much so well as Clun 
used to do; nor another Hart's which was Cassio's; nor, indeed, 
Burt doing the Moor's so well as I once thought he did" (Diary, 
viii. io6-07). His Majesty's Company of Comedians opened their 
new playhouse, the Theatre Royal, on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, 
Diary, iii. 107), under the management of Thomas Killigrew. 
As a member of this organization Burt had the following parts 
(Downes, Ros. Aug., 2. ff.): Seleucus in The Humorous Lieutenant; 
Don John Decastrio in Rule a Wife, and have a Wife; Corvino in 
The Fox; Cleremont in The Silent Woman; Surly in The Alchemist; 
Tygranes in King and no King; La Torch in Rollo, Duke of Nor- 
mandy; Elder Loveless in The Scornful Lady; Charles in The Elder 
Brother; The Moor in The Moor of Venice; the Prince in King Henry 
the Fourth; Lysimantes in The Maiden Queen; Don Lopez in The 
Mock Astrologer; Vasquez in The Indian Emferour; Camillo in The 
Assignation, or Love in a Nunnery; Palamede in Marriage Alamode; 
Count Guesselin in The Black Prince; and Maherbal, in Sofhonisba, 
or Hannibal' s Overthrow. 

BURTON, ANTHONY. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
1 6x8, Anthony Burton is recorded at Norwich on July 1. of the 
same year (Murray, ii. 103). 

BYLAND, AMBROSE. 

Ambrose Byland is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December xj, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by 
the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as 
Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
P- 74)- 

81 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

CANDLER, JAMES. 

In 1569 James Candler was the leader of a company at Ipswich, 
as shown by an entry in the town records: "Paid to Jemes Candler 
and his company for playing in the Halle, 10/." (Hist. MSS. 
Comm., ix. i. p. X49). 

CANE, ANDREW. 

Andrew Cane is named in the i€r.i. Herbert lists of both the 
Palsgrave's and the Lady Elizabeth's players (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 63). In explanation of the apparently dual connection it 
is suggested that when the new Fortune was building in i6zz, 
and the Palsgrave's men were preparing to open this playhouse, 
Cane joined them from the Lady Elizabeth's men (Murray, i. 
115-16). Of Cane between 162.1. and 163 1 nothing is known. He 
may have remained with the Palsgrave's company until Decem- 
ber, 1 63 1, when this troupe seems to have passed under the 
patronage of the young Prince Charles. His name appears in the 
patent of December 7, 1631, granted to Prince Charles's company 
(Murray, ii. 358). During the same month (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
p. 45) he played Trimalchio, a humorous gallant, in Marmion's 
Holland's Leaguer, presented by "the high and mighty Prince 
Charles his servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" 
(Marmion, Works, pp. x, 6). His name appears in a warrant of 
May 10, 1631, appointing several of Prince Charles's men as 
Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). On Decem- 
ber 10, 1635, and May 4, 1640, he served as joint-payee for per- 
formances at Court by Prince Charles's players (Steele, pp. 150, 
175). On September 19, 1639, the Prince's men were summoned to 
appear for acting at the Red Bull a "scandalous and libellous 
play," The Whore in Grain, new vamped, in which Cane had 
spoken the words that libeled the alderman (Chalmers, Apology, 
p. 504). That Cane attained great popularity as a comedian is 
shown in contemporary and later writings. He is one of the 
speakers in The Stage-Players Complaint, in a pleasant Dialogue he- 

. 8x 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

tween Cane of the Fortune and Reed of the Friers, deploring their sad and 
solitary conditions for want of Imployment, in this heavie and Con- 
tagious time of the Plague in London (1641). In The Comflaint, Cane 
and Reed are brought together in the street conversing about 
their misfortunes, and the dialogue commences thus : 

Cane. Stay, Reed. Whither away so speedily? What, you goe as 
if you meant to leape over the Moon now! What's the matter? 

Reede. The matter is plain enough. You incuse me of my nimble 
feet, but I thinke your tongue runnes a little faster and you con- 
tend as much to out-strip facetious Mercury in your tongue, as 
lame Vulcan in my feete. 

In the next speeches, and for the rest of the dialogue. Cane is 
ca.\led Quick in the prefixes, and Reed, Light, which probably give 
the appellations by which they were then popularly known 
(Hazlitt, Eng. Dr. & Stage, p. X53). In A Key to the Cabinet of the 
Parliament (1648), Cane is mentioned with two other celebrated 
players: "We need not any more stage-players: we thank them 
[the Puritans] for suppressing them: they save us money; for I'll 
undertake we can laugh as heartily at Foxley, Peters, and others 
of their godly ministers, as ever we did at Cane at the Red Bull, 
Tom Pollard in The Humorous Lieutenant, Robins in The Changling, 
or any humourist of them all" (Collier, ii. 38). Edmund Gay ton 
alludes to him in his Pleasant Notes upon Don Quixot (1654), p. 2.J1 : 
"It was not then the most mimicall nor fighting man. Fowler, nor 
Andrew Cane could pacifie; Prologues nor Epilogues would pre- 
vaile; the Devill and the fool were quite out of favour." His 
reputation long survived him, for he is mentioned as late as 1673, 
in a tract by Henry Chapman on the Bath waters: "Without 
which a pamphlet now a days finds as small acceptance, as a 
Comedy did formerly at the Fortune Play-house without a Jig 
of Andrew Keins into the bargain" (Collier, Bibl. Ace, iv. 93). 
Fleay (Drama, i. x^'^-^€) suggests that there is an allusion to 
Cane as "Andrew, our elder journeyman," in Heywood's Fair 

83 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Maid of f he West, Part I, V. i. iii, acted by Queen Henrietta's men 
about 1630: 

It is not now as when Andrea liv'd, 

Or rather Andrew, our elder journeyman. 

The identification is doubtful, for Cane was certainly not dead in 
1630, as the above lines seem to imply. Besides, Andrew was a 
common name; and Andrew Pennycuicke was probably a member 
of the Queen's troupe about this time. The name Andrew Keyne 
occurs several times in the Clerkenwell burial registers of 1639 
and 1640 (Hovenden, iv. x4o, 2.41). The burials were of "a boy 
from Andrew Keyne's," on October 11, 1639; three servants "to 
Andrew Keyne," in November and December, 1639; and "Marye 
d. of Andrew Keyne," on January 4, 1640. A recent book by Leslie 
Hotson (The Commonwealth and Restoration Stage, 192.8, pp. 7, 46, 
51-53) gives additional information concerning the later life of 
Cane. After the wars he was a goldsmith, and was known as 
Decayne or De Caine. On December 12., i64z, "Cain the Clown 
at the Bull, and others came in great multitude, and filled the 
Hall and Yard," while the mayor and council were in meeting 
at the Guildhall. In June, 1644, he is referred to in Mercurius 
Britanicus, the Parliament newsbook, as engraver of the dies for 
the debased coinage of the Royalist Army: "I could wish that 
the Coine for his Majesties souldiers might not come too fast 
that way to this City, which is graved in the West, by the 
quondam foole of the Red Bull, now stampt for a knave in brasse, 
I mean farthing tokens, made now in the West." His company 
continued to give surreptitions performances at the Red Bull. In 
January, 1650, the players were surprised by soldiers, who took 
several of the principal actors to prison. Mercurius Pragjnaticus 
(for King Charles W) refers to this encounter: "Andr. Cane is out of 
date and all other his complices; alas poor players they are acting 
their parts in prison, for their presumptions to break a Parliament 
Crack." On December 9, iS'^'l, he signed a goldsmiths's petition 

84 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

to Parliament. In 1654 he was concerned in a Chancery suit 
against William Wintershall, the actor. 

CAREY, GILES. 

As a member of the Children of the Queen's Revels company, 
Giles Carey (or Gary) appears in the actor-list affixed to Jonson's 
Epkoene, which, according to the folio of 1616, was "Acted in 
the yeere 1609." He belonged to the Lady Elizabeth's troupe by 
August i9, 1 61 1, on which date he and his fellow-actors gave 
Philip Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" of 
agreement (H.P., pp. 18, iii). The 1679 folio of Beaumont and 
Fletcher names Carey as one of the "principal actors" in The 
Coxcomb, which may have been acted by the Lady Elizabeth's 
men about 1613 (Eliz.- Stage, ii. 2.51). 

CARLETON, NICHOLAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's at some date before 1581. 
He appears as a legatee in the will of Sebastian Westcott, dated 
April 3, 1582., where he is named among the "sometimes children 
of the said almenerey," i.e. St. Paul's QEliZ- Stage, ii. i5«.)- 

CARPENTER, WILLIAM. 

As a member of the Lady Elizabeth's company, on August 2.^, 
1 61 1, William Carpenter with his fellow-actors gave Philip 
Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" of agree- 
ment (H.P., pp. 18, III). Subsequently he joined Prince Charles's 
troupe, for early in 1619, as servant to the Prince, he appeared as 
Time in Middleton's Masque of Heroes (Works, vii. xoo). With 
Prince Charles's men he took part in King James's funeral pro- 
cession on May 7, 162.5 (Murray, i. 161, X37). In 16x3 a William 
Carpenter, possibly the actor, was a porter at the Marshalsea 
(Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). His name is mentioned in the suit 
growing out of the performance at the Red Bull in 16x4 of 
Dekker's Keep the Widow Waking (Sisson, The Library, N.S., 19x7, 
viii, Z35-36). 

85 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

CARR, JOHN. 

On September 13, 1631, John Carr is mentioned at Coventry 
with the Children of the King's Revels (Murray, ii. 13, 2.51). 

CARTWRIGHT, WILLIAM, SENIOR. 

On April 2.1, 1598, William Cartwright, senior, was associated 
with Richard Jones in borrowing loj-. from Philip Henslowe 
(H.D., i. 38). At this time Jones was an Admiral's man, and 
Cartwright was probably a hired man of the same company. 
With the Admiral's troupe he appeared in Fortune's Tennis, c. 
1597-38; as a Moor and as Pisano in The Battle of Alcaxar, c. 1600- 
01; and as a nobleman, an attendant, a hostage, a captain, and a 
Bohar, in i Tamar Cam, i6oi (Greg, H.F., pp. 153, 154; R.E.S., 
i. 170; Chambers, Eliz.- Stage, ii. 175-76). In 1603 the Admiral's 
men were taken into the service of Prince Henry; but in their 
patent of 1606, Cartwright' s name does not appear. On the death 
of Prince Henry the company came under the patronage of the 
Palsgrave, and Cartwright is named in the license of January 11, 
1 61 3, granted to the Palsgrave's men (£//;<:;. Stage, ii. 190). When 
the company leased the Fortune from Edward Alleyn on October 
31, 1618, Cartwright appeared as one of the lessees (H.P., p. xrj'). 
He is mentioned as dining with Alleyn on various occasions be- 
tween March iz, 1617, and August 18, i6xx. On the latter date 
he was still a member of the Palsgrave's company at the Fortune 
(Young, ii. 73, 148, 174, i.o/\, 2.47). In 16x3 he lived at the upper 
end of White Cross Street (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). On April 
30, 16x4, he and others of the Palsgrave's men entered into a bond 
to Richard Gunnell, manager of the company (Hotson, pp. 51-53). 
There seems to be no further record of him until the Norwich list 
of March 10, 1635, when he visited the town as a member of, pre- 
sumably, the King's Revels company (Murray, i. 179-80); he 
may have joined that troupe on its organization in 16x9 at Salis- 
bury Court (Adams, Playhouses, p. 374). With the King's Revels 
he played Claudius, the Emperor, in Richard's Messallina, the 

86 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Roman Empress, printed in 1640. On May iz, 1636, Herbert re- 
ceived £1 from "ould Cartwright for allowing the [Fortune] 
company to add scenes to an ould play, and to give it out for a 
new one" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 37). There is in the Dulwich 
gallery a picture of "Old Mr. Cartwright, actor; in a gilt frame" 
(Warner, p. xoy). The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records 
the burial of a William Cartwright in 1650 (Malcolm, Lond. 
Rediv., iii. 304). 

CARTWRIGHT, WILLIAM, JUNIOR. 

William Cartwright, junior, is generally thought to be the son 
of William Cartwright, senior. The Norwich list of March 10, 
1635, shows that he and his father were associated in what was 
apparently the King's Revels company (Murray, i. 179-80). We 
have the authority of Wright in Historia Histrionka (1699) for 
the statement that the younger Cartwright acted at Salisbury 
Court (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 404). He was probably a member of 
Queen Henrietta's troupe at Salisbury Court from 1637 to the 
closing of the playhouses in 1641, for the Queen's men and the 
King's Revels company were united at this playhouse about Oc- 
tober, 1637 (cf. Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 66). During the period of 
the Commonwealth he became a bookseller and publisher in 
Turnstile Alley, and among the works issued by him was a new 
edition of Heywood's Apology for Actors, under the title of The 
Actor's Vindication (c. 1658). After the Restoration he joined the 
company formed out of "the scattered remnants" of players 
belonging to several of the older houses during the reign of 
Charles I. He is named in the Petition of the Cockpit Players on 
October 13, 1660, and in the Articles of Agreement between 
Herbert and Killigrew on June 4, i66i (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 
94, 113-14). His Majesty's Company of Comedians opened their 
new playhouse, the Theatre Royal, on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, 
Diary, iii. 107), under the management of Thomas Killigrew. As 
a member of this organization Cartwright played the following 

87 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

parts (Downes, Ros. Ang., pp. x fF.): Corbachio in The Fox; 
Morose in The Silent Woman; Sir Epicure Mammon in The Al- 
chemist; Lygones in King and no King; Brabantio in The Moor of 
Venice; Falstaff in King Henry the Fourth; the Priest in The Indian 
Emperor; Major Oldfox in The Plain Dealer; Apollonius in Tyran- 
nick Love; Mario in The Assignation, or Love in a Nunnery; John in 
The Destruction of Jerusalem; Hermogenes in Marriage Alamode; 
Lord Latimer in The Black Prince; and Abenamar, in The Conquest 
of Granada. On November x, 1667, Pepys say him as Falstaff: 
"After dinner my wife and Willett and I to the King's playhouse, 
and there saw Henry the Fourth; and contrary to expectation, was 
pleased in nothing more than in Cartwright's speaking of Fal- 
staff's speech about 'What is Honour?' " (Diary, vii. lyx). 
Sometime during his career he seems to have played in Shirley's 
Sisters, for "Mr. Cartrite" is named in the prompter's copy of this 
play (Shirley, Works, v. 354). Downes ranks him in the list of 
good actors with Nicholas Burt and Robert Shatterell, but with 
no distinguishing comment (Ros. Ang., p. 17). In 1682. there was 
an amalgamation of the King's company and the Duke of York's 
servants, at Drury Lane, under the leadership of Thomas Better- 
ton. Cartwright is named in the list of the combined companies. 
After the fusion he is known to have acted Cacafogo in Rule a 
Wife, and have a Wife (Downes, Ros. Ang., p. 39). He died in 
December, 1687, and left his books, pictures, various household 
articles, and a sum of money to Dulwich College (Warner, pp. 
154, X04, xo6, X07, xo8). A catalogue of this collection of pictures, 
apparently in Cartwright's own handwriting, is preserved, in 
which there is listed a portrait of "Young Mr. Cartwright, 
actor; in a gilt frame." This picture being lost, there is no way 
of judging whether the portrait was that of the William Cart- 
wright who owned the collection, and whose portrait is extant, 
with the description: "My picture in a black dress, with a great 
dog." Pictures of his wives are also in the Dulwich gallery: "My 
first wife's picture like a shepherdess, on 3 quarters cloth; in a 

88 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

gilt frame"; and "My last wife's picture, with a black veil on 
her head; in a gilt frame, 3 quarters cloth." It is likely that the 
British Museum Egerton MS. 1994 originally belonged to Cart- 
wright, and was a part of his bequest to Dulwich College (Boas, 
Library, 1917, viii. xx6, 137-38). The careers of the two Cart- 
wrights cover almost a century of stage history, and form a link 
between Edward Alleyn of the Fortune and Thomas Betterton 
of Drury Lane. 

CARVER, WILLIAM. 

William Carver is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December 2.7, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by 
the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as 
Musitions and other necessary attendantfes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

CASTLE, THOMAS. 

A player, whose son, Nicholas, and daughter, Hester, were 
baptized at St. Giles's on October 9, 1608, and April 15, 1610, 
respectively (JS/i;^. Stage, ii. 310). 

CATTANES. 

On January 2.4, 1 602.-03, Cattanes authorized a payment on 
behalf of Worcester's men (H.D., i. 188). 

CAVALLERIZZO, CLAUDIO. 

Claudio Cavallerizzo is mentioned, in an undated letter from 
Petruccio Ubaldini to Queen Elizabeth, as concerned with Ferra- 
bosco in the presentation of an Italian comedy QM.S.C, ii. 147). 
He may have been a member of the Italian company of players 
("Alfruso Ferrabolle and the rest of the Italian players") who 
received payment for a play presented at Court on February 17, 
1576 (Steele, p. 59). 

CHAMBERS, WILLIAM. 

William Chambers is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December %j, 1614, to twenty-one men "imployed 

89 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

CHAPPELL, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal about 1600-01. In Henry Clif- 
ton's complaint to the Star Chamber on December 15, 1601, as to 
how boys were pressed for the Chapel at Blackfriars, John Chap- 
pell is named as one so taken, and is described as "a gramer 
schole scholler of one Mr. Spykes schole neere Criplegate, Lon- 
don" (Wallace, Blackfriars, p. 80). 

CHESSON, THOMAS. 

Thomas Chesson may have been with the Earl of Oxford's 
players in 1580. On April 13, 1580, the Privy Council committed 
Robert Leveson and Lawrence Dutton, servants of the Earl of 
Oxford, to the Marshalsea for taking part in an affray with the 
gentlemen of the Inns of Court. On May 2.6 the matter was re- 
ferred to three judges for examination. Thomas Chesson, "some- 
time servant to the Earl of Oxford," seems also to have been con- 
cerned, for on July 18 he was released on bond from the prison of 
the Gatehouse (Dasent, xi. 445; xii. 37, iii). 

CHOFE, ROBERT. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

CLARK, HUGH. 

Hugh Clark was probably with Queen Henrietta's men at the 
Cockpit in Drury Lane from their formation in 16x5 to their 
dissolution in 1637. As a member of this company he acted in the 
following plays (Murray, i. opp. z66): Gratiana, Sir Belfare's 
daughter, in Shirley's Wedding (c. 162.6); Hubert in Davenport's 
King John and Matilda (c. 16x9); Besse Bridges, the fair maid of 
the West, in Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, Part I (c. 1630; ed. 

90 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Bates, p. 145); and two parts, Nuntius and Syphax, in Nabbes's 
Hannibal and Scipio (1635). When Queen Henrietta's company 
disbanded in 1637 some of the members united with the Revels 
company at Salisbury Court, and others joined Beeston's Boys at 
the Cockpit; but Clark is not known to have joined either of 
these troupes. By 1641 he was a King's man, his name appearing 
in a warrant of January 2.1. of that year (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
103). For a revival of Beaumont and Fletcher's Ci^j-^f?^? of the Country 
by the King's men, a special Prologue was written (which appears 
,in only the 1647 folio), labeled "For my Sonne Clarke" (Works, 
i. 387, 456), meaning apparently that Clark was the "son" or 
poetic disciple of the unknown author of the Prologue. His name 
is appended to the dedicatory epistle of the 1647 folio edition 
of Beaumont and Fletcher's plays, published by a group of the 
King's players (Works, i. p. x). On January i8, 1648, he and 
other members of the King's company gave a bond to pay off an 
old Bl ackfri ars debt to Michael Bo wyer ' s heirs (Hotson , pp . 3 1-3 4) . 
A Hugh Clark was buried at St. James, Clerkenwell, on October 
7, 1653 (Hovenden, iv. 2.96). 

CLARK, SILL. 

Apparently an actor or stage-attendant mentioned in a stage- 
direction of The Blind-Beggar of Bednal-Green, written by John Day 
and Henry Chettle about 1600 and printed in 1659 as "divers 
times publickly acted by the Princes Servants." The stage-direc- 
tion seemingly means that Sill Clark played Captain Westford: 
"Enter old Playnsey, old Strowd, and Captain Westford, Sill 
Clark" (Bullen's edit., p. 96). The Prince's men of the title-page 
are probably the later Prince Charles's servants (1631-41), and 
Clark may have been a minor actor in that troupe. 

CLARKE, JOHN. 

John Clarke, a former child of the Chapel Royal, was sworn in 
as a Gentleman of the Chapel on August i.^, 1608 (Hillebrand, 
Mod. Phil., xviii. 157). 

91 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

CLARKE, MARY. 

Mary Clarke, alias Wood, was joint-legatee with Thomas 
Bromley in the will, dated July 2.1, 1603, of Thomas Pope, who 
left to them his share in the Globe playhouse. Subsequently she 
appears to have married John Edmonds (or Edmans), a member 
of Queen Anne's company (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 3 fF.). 

CLARKE, ROBERT. 

A player, whose son, Ezekiel, was buried at St. Giles's on 
November 7, 1617 QEliz- Stage, ii. 310). He is probably to be 
identified with the person of the same name mentioned in a Pro- 
tection from Arrest issued by Herbert on December xy, 16x4, to 
twenty-one men "imployed by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in 
theire quallity of Playinge as Musitions and other necessary 
attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 74). 

CLARKE, THOMAS. 

As one of the Earl of Leicester's men in i57X Thomas Clarke 
signed a letter addressed to the Earl requesting his continued 
patronage QM.S.C, i. 348). 

CLAY, HENRY. 

Henry Clay is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December xj, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed 
by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records the 
burial of a daughter of a Henry Cley in i6x6 (Malcolm, Land. 
Rediv., iii. 304). 

CLAY, NATHANIEL. 

About April, 161 8, Nathaniel Clay is named as a Queen Anne's 
man in a Letter of Assistance granting him, Martin Slater, and 
John Edmonds permission to play as "her Maiesties servants of 
her Royall Chamber of Bristol." Nothing further is heard of 

92- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Clay until December 30, 1619, when he is mentioned in a license 
issued to a group of players under the leadership of Robert Kimp- 
ton, presumably the Children of the King's Revels. They presented 
the license at Reading soon afterwards (Murray, ii. 5 ff., 13, 386). 

CLAYTONE, RICHARD. 

In 16x3 Richard Clay tone was an actor at the Fortune, and 
lived "in Goulding Lane." With Richard Grace, William Strat- 
ford, and Abraham Pedle, "all Actors at the fortune neere Gold- 
ing lane," he was summoned to appear at court to answer a Bill 
of Complaint made by Gervase Markham (Wallace, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 348, 350). Since in 16x3 the Fortune was occupied by the 
Palsgrave's men, Claytone doubtless belonged to that company. 

CLEMENT, WILLIAM. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314-15). 

CLEY, HENRY. 

See Henry Clay. 

CLIFTON, THOMAS. 

On December 13, 1600, James Robinson, acting as deputy under 
the commission of Nathaniel Giles, impressed and carried off to 
the Blackfriars playhouse Thomas the only son and heir of Henry 
Clifton, a gentleman of some importance from Norfolk, who was 
temporarily residing in London for the purpose of educating the 
boy. Clifton says in his complaint that Giles, Evans, and their 
confederates, "well knowing that your subject's said son had no 
manner of sight in song, nor skill in music," on the above date, 
did "waylay the said Thomas Clifton" as he was "walking 
quietly from your subject's said house towards the said school," 
and "with great force and violence did seize and surprise, and 
him with like force and violence did, to the great terror and 
hurt of him, the said Thomas Clifton, haul, pull, drag, and carry 

93 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

away to the said playhouse." As soon as the father learned of 
this, he hurried to the playhouse and "made request to have his 
said son released." But Giles and Evans "utterly and scornfully 
refused to do" this. Whereupon Clifton threatened to complain 
to the Privy Council. But Evans and Giles "in very scornful 
manner willed your said subject to complain to whom he would. 
Clifton suggested that "it was not fit that a gentleman of his 
sort should have his son and heir (and that his only son) to be so 
basely used." Giles and Evans "most arrogantly then and there 
answered that they had authority sufficient so to take any noble- 
man's son in the land"; and further to irritate the father, they 
immediately put into young Clifton's hands "a scroll of paper, 
containing part of one of their said plays or interludes, and him, 
the said Thomas Clifton, commanded to learn the same by 
heart," with the admonition that "if he did not obey the said 
Evans, he should be surely whipped." Clifton at once appealed 
to his friend, Sir John Fortescue, a member of the Privy Council, 
at whose order young Clifton was released within twenty-four 
hours after seizure, and sent back to his studies (see Adams, 
Playhouses, p. xio; the complaint is given in full by Fleay, Stage, 
V- 12-7)- 
CLUN, WALTER. 

Wright in his Historia Histrionka (1699) states that "Hart and 
Clun were bred up boys at the Blackfriars, and acted women's 
parts" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 404). There seems to be no record 
of Clun during the period of the Civil War and the Common- 
wealth. After the Restoration he continued his theatrical career 
at the Cockpit. He is named in the Petition of the Cockpit 
Players on October 13, i66c, and in the Articles of Agreement 
between Herbert and Killigrew on June 4, i66i (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, pp. 94, 113-14). As a member of His Majesty's Company of 
Comedians, under the management of Thomas Killigrew, he 
played the title-role in The Humorous Lieutenant, which opened 
the new playhouse, the Theatre Royal, on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, 

94 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Diary, iii. 107), and "was Acted Twelve Days Successively." 
Shortly afterwards, he appeared as Cacafogo in Rtde a Wife, and 
have a Wife, which part was later taken by William Cartwright, 
the younger (Downes, Ros. Aug., pp. x fF.,39). Clun's stage-career 
after the Restoration was brief, for he was murdered on the night 
of August X, 1664, near Kentish Town. On August 5 Pepys 
visited the scene of the murder: "To my cozen, W. Joyce's, 
. . . and he and I [rode] out of towne toward Highgate; in 
the way, at Kentish-towne, showing me the place and manner of 
Clun's being killed and laid in a ditch, and yet was not killed by 
any wounds, having only one in his arm, but blead to death 
through his struggling" (Diary, iv. 195). A poem upon his death 
was published at the time, entitled: "An Elegy upon the most 
execrable murder of Mr. Clun, one of the comedians of the 
Theatre Royal, who was robbed and most inhumanly killed on 
Tuesday night, being the znd of August, 1664, near Tatnam 
Court, as he was riding to his country house at Kentish Town" 
(Wheatley's note, Pepys, Diary, iv. 195). Clun was evidently a 
great favorite with Pepys, who considered him one of the best 
actors in the King's company, as shown by entries in the Diary 
so late as 1669. On February 6, 1669, Pepys saw Othello: "After 
dinner to the King's playhouse, and there . . . did see The 
Moor of Venice: but ill acted in most parts; Mohun, which did a 
little surprise me, not acting lago's part by much so well as Clun 
used to do." Again on April 17, 1669, Pepys remembers Clun: 
"At noon home to dinner, and there find Mr. Pierce, the surgeon, 
and he dined with us; and there hearing that The Alchymist was 
acted, we did go, and took him with us to the King's house; and 
it is still a good play, having not been acted for two or three 
years before; but I do miss Clun, for the Doctor" (Diary, viii. 
■LoG-oj, X79). Aubrey in one of his jottings notes in his char- 
acteristic gossipy way that "Ben Johnson had one eie lowre 
than t'other, and bigger, like Clun, the player; perhaps he be- 
gott Clun" (Lives, ii. 14). 

95 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

COBORNE, EDWARD. 

A player, whose son, John, was baptized at St. Giles's on 
November Z3, 1616. He may be identical with Edward Colbrand 
QEliZ- Stage, ii. 310). 

CODBOLT, LIGHTFOOT. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

CODBOLT, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

COFFIN, FRANCIS. 

In a warrant of February 16, 1595, Richard Bradshaw and 
Francis Coffin are named as members of Lord Edward Dudley's 
provincial company of players; and with their license they ap- 
peared at Chester on November xo, 1602. (Murray, ii. 2.34). 

COKE, RICHARD. 

From 1547 to 1556 Richard Coke seems to have been a Court 
Interluder, at a salary of £3 6s. Sd. a year (Collier, i. 136, 165). 

COLBRAND, EDWARD. 

Edward Colbrand is named as one of Prince Henry's players 
in the household list of 1610. The Prince died in November, i6ii, 
and his troupe soon passed under the patronage of the Palsgrave. 
Colbrand is mentioned in the new patent granted to the Pals- 
grave's company on January 11, 1613 (^EliZ- Stage, ii. 188, 190). 

COLES, ROBERT. 

Robert Coles belonged to the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hille- 
brand, Child Actors, p. iii). Apparently he was the performer of 
Andrugio mentioned in a stage-direction of Marston's / Antonio 
and Mellida, IV. i. 19, presented by Paul's boys about 1599: 
"Enter Andrugio, Lucio, Cole, and Norwood" (Marston, 
Works, i. 63). 

96 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

COLLEWELL, RICHARD. 

Richard CoUewell was a member of Richard Bradshaw's com- 
pany, a troupe that got into trouble at Banbury in May, 1633. 
The town authorities, becoming suspicious of the validity of the 
company's license, arrested the players, and notified the Privy 
Council. The players appeared before the Privy Council in June, 
and were soon discharged "upon bond given to be forthcoming 
whensoever they should be called for." In the examination of 
the players by the Banbury officials, Collewell testified that he 
had been with the company about two years and was a servant 
to Edward Whiting (Murray, ii. 106 fF., 163 fF.). 

COLLINS, EDWARD. 

Edward Collins is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January iz, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 
servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

COLLINS, JEFFERY. 

Jeffery Collins is named in a Protection from arrest, from im- 
pressment as soldiers, and from any other molestation what- 
soever, issued by Herbert on December 17, 16x4, to twenty-one 
men "imployed by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire 
quallity of Playinge as Musitions and other necessary attend- 
antes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 74). 

COLMAN, WILLIAM. 

William Colman appears as a member of the Chapel Royal in 
1509 and 15 II. He may have subsequently been sworn in as a 
Gentleman of the Chapel, for a William Colman is found among 
the Gentleman of the Chapel in the lists of 15x0, 15x4, and 15x6 
(Brewer, L. & P. Henry VIII, i. i. p. 15; Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., 
xviii. X44-45; Chambers, Eli^. Stage, ii. xyn.'). 

97 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

COMBES, WILLIAM. 

A lawsuit of 1594 names William Combes as one of the Children 
of Windsor. A Bill of Complaint, dated April 9, 1594, states that 
William Combes, senior, carpenter, father of William Combes, 
junior, had made an agreement with Nathaniel Giles, apparently 
at this date acting master of the chapel at Windsor, whereby the 
boy was to receive four years' instruction as chorister at the 
chapel of St. George's, Windsor. In return for the education of his 
son and a sum of money paid by Giles, Combes had agreed to 
buy and pasture a mare for the use of Giles. The lawsuit arose 
because Combes failed to observe the terms of the bargain (Hille- 
brand. Child Actors, pp. 158, 330-31). 

CONDELL, HENRY. 

The first appearance of Henry Condell in dramatic history rests 
upon the conjecture that he was the "Harry" who played Ferrex 
in "Envy" and a lord in "Lechery" of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, pre- 
sented by Lord Strange's company about 1590 (Greg, H.P., p. 
i5i; R.E.S., i. z6i). The first definite notice of him is in the list 
of the original "principal Comedians" who acted in Jonson's 
Every Man in his Humor, as played by the Chamberlain's men in 
1598. With the same company he had a part in Every Man out of his 
Humor, presented in 1599. In 1603 the Chamberlain's company 
passed under royal patronage, and Condell is named in the patent 
granted on May 19, 1603, to the King's men. He was prominently 
associated with this troup until his death in 16x7. His name ap- 
pears in the 16x3 folio list of actors in Shakespeare's plays; in the 
procession list of March 15, 1604; in the patent of March zrj, 1619; 
in the livery-allowance lists of May 19, 1619, and April 7, i6zi; 
in the list of players taking part in King James's funeral proces- 
sion on May 7, 16x5; and in the patent of June ^4, 16x5. He is 
introduced with his fellows of the King's men into the Induction 
to Marston's Malcontent (1604). The Globe was destroyed by fire 

98 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in June, 1613, and Condell is mentioned in a contemporary ballad, 
entitled, A Sonnett ufon the -pittiful burneing of the Globe flayhowse 
in London (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 310): 

The reprobates, thoughe druncke on munday, 
Prayd for the Foole and Henry Condye. 

The esteem in which he was held by his fellows is shown by the 
wills of Augustine Phillips (1605), who left him 30J. in gold; of 
Alexander Cooke (1614), who named him as trustee; of William 
Shakespeare (1616), who bequeathed him a memorial ring; of 
Nicholas Tooley (16x3), who appointed him executor and joint 
residuary legatee, and assigned sums of money to his wife and to 
his daughter, Elizabeth; and of John Underwood (16x5), who 
designated him as executor. By 1599 he was married and ap- 
parently settled in St. Mary Aldermanbury, where he was a 
church-warden. The registers of the parish supply the following 
records of his children: Elizabeth (baptized February xy, 1599; 
buried April 11, 1599), Anne (baptized April 4, 1601; buried 
July 16, 1610), Richard (baptized April 18, i6ox), Elizabeth (bap- 
tized April 14, 1603; buried April xx, 1603), Elizabeth (baptized 
October 2.6, 1606), Mary (baptized January 30, 1608; buried from 
Hoxton at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, March 18, 1608), Henry 
(baptized May 6, 1610; buried March 4, 1630), William (baptized 
May x6, 161 1), and Edward (baptized August xx, 1614; buried 
August 7-1, 1614): see Collier, Actors, pp. iT,^~-i,^;Variorum, iii. 199, 
476; Collier, iii. 367-71. Subsequently Condell had a "country- 
house" at Fulham, for on September 10, 16x5, a pamphlet, written 
by certain players on their travels during the plague, entitled 
The Run-awayes Answer to a Booke called A Rodde for Runne-awayes, 
was addressed "To our much respected and very worthy friend, 
Mr. H. Condell, at his country-house at Fulham." The dedica- 
tion shows the good terms in which Condell lived with his 
associates, and emphasizes the hospitality that he accorded the 
players, who express their gratitude for "a free and noble fare- 

99 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

well" bestowed upon them as they went into the provinces 
(Collier, Actors, p. 14^). At his house in Fulham, on December 13, 
16x7, when "sick in body, but of perfect mind and memory," he 
made his will, naming, with others, John Heminges and Cuthbert 
Burbage as overseers. In 1619 he was described as "of greate 
lyveinge, wealth, and power" (Wallace, N.U.S., x. 311), and 
the property assigned in his will lends emphasis to the statement. 
He names his wife, Elizabeth, as sole executrix, and leaves to her, 
to his sons Henry and William, and to his daughter Elizabeth, 
wife of Herbert Finch, much property at Aldermanbury and else- 
where in London, including "rents and profits" by "leases and 
terms of years" of "messuages, houses, and places" in Black- 
friars and on the Bankside. He did not forget his old servant, 
Elizabeth Wheaton, to whom he left 40J. and "that place or 
priviledge which she now exerciseth and enjoyeth in the houses 
of the Blackfryers, London, and the Globe on the Bankside" 
(Collier, Actors, p. 148). Condell had not been an original sharer 
of the Globe in 1599, but subsequently acquired an interest; he 
was an original sharer of the Second Blackfriars in 1608. The 
papers of 1635 show that his widow had controlled four-six- 
teenths of the Globe and one-eighth of the Blackfriars, but had 
transferred two-sixteenths of the Globe when Taylor and Lowin 
were admitted as sharers (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 4 fF.; Halli- 
well-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 3ii, 313). Condell was buried on De- 
cember X9, 16x7, and his widow was buried on October 3, 1635, 
both at St. Mary Aldermanbury (Collier, Actors, pp. 144, 150). 
From the actor-lists Condell is known to have taken parts in the 
following plays presented by the King's men (Murray, i. opp. 
i7x): Sejanus (1603); Volpone (1605); The Alchemist (1610); 
Catiline (1611); The Duchess of Malfi (c. 161 1), the part of the 
Cardinal, which by 16x3 had probably passed to Richard Robinson 
(Murray, ii. 146 fF.); The Captain (c. i6ix); Valentinian (c. 1611- 
14); Bonduca (c. 1613-14); The Queen of Corinth (c. 1617); The 
Knight of Malta (c. 161 8); The Mad Lover (c. 161 8); The Loyal 

100 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS' 

Subject (1618); and The Humorous Lieutenant (c. 1619). This list 
seems to indicate that he left the stage about 1619. Thereafter he 
was with the King's men probably in some managerial capacity. 
John Roberts in his Answer to Pope (172.9) asserts that Condell was 
a comic performer and a printer (Variorum, iii. 186, 199), but he 
adduced no authority for his improbable assertions beyond 
a vague stage-tradition, and neither statement can be verified. 
In only one of the actor lists mentioned above is Condell 's 
specific part given; and that he played the Cardinal in The 
Duchess of Malfi entirely discredits Roberts's conjecture that he 
was a comedian. His greatest contribution to dramatic history 
is no doubt his work as joint-editor with Heminges on the First 
Folio of Shakespeare in 16x3. In July, 1896, there was unveiled 
at St. Mary Aldermanbury a memorial to Heminges and Con- 
dell, with the inscription: "To the memory of John Heminge 
and Henry Condell, fellow actors and personal friends of 
Shakespeare. They lived many years in this parish, and are 
buried here. To their disinterested efforts the world owes all 
that it calls Shakespeare. They alone collected his dramatic 
writings, regardless of pecuniary loss, and, without the hope 
of any profit, gave them to the world. They thus merit 
the gratitude of mankind." They are mentioned in Scott's 
Woodstock (i8x6). 

COOKE, ABELL. 

Abell Cooke is recorded as a member of the Queen's Revels in 
a lawsuit of 1607. He was the son of Alice Cooke, who apprenticed 
him to Thomas Kendall on November 14, 1606, to remain three 
years as a player with the Queen's Revels. Trouble arose when 
the boy quit the troupe on May 31, 1607, before completing his 
apprenticeship. His mother deposed that he played at Black- 
friars as often as he was required, and that he left the company 
by Kendall's written permission (Hillebrand, Child Actors, pp. 
197-98). 

101 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

COOKE, ALEXANDER. 

A rather dubious conjecture assigns to Alexander Cooke the 
parts of Videna in "Envy" and Progne in "Lechery," assumed by 
"Sander" in 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Lord Strange's 
company about 1590 (Greg, H.P., p. i5x; R.E.S., i. x62.). He is 
named among the performers of Shakespeare's plays in the 16x3 
folio, and Malone ventures the guess that he "performed all the 
principal female characters" in the plays of the great dramatist 
(Variorum, in. zii). As a King's man he appears in the actor-lists 
(Murray, i. opp. lyx) of Jonson's Sejanus (1603), Volpone (1605), 
The Alchemist (1610}, and Catiline (161 1), and of Beaumont and 
Fletcher's Captain (c. i6ix). From the fact that in the lists pre- 
fixed to Sejanus and Volpone his name occurs at the end, some 
critics have assumed that he played the female parts of Agrippina 
in the former and Fine-madam Would-be in the latter. In the 
postscript to a letter of October zi, 1603, from Joan Alleyn to her 
husband, "Mr. Cooke and his weife" commend themselves "in 
the kyndest sorte" to Edward Alleyn (Warner, p. x^'). Augustine 
Phillips in his will dated May 4, 1605, bequeathed him as a 
fellow-actor 2.0s. in gold (Collier, Actors, p. 87). The token-books 
of St. Saviour's, Southwark, record an Alexander Cooke in Hill's 
Rents during 1604, 1607, 1609, and 1610. This is no doubt the 
actor, for the registers of the same parish in giving the baptism 
of his children specify his profession as that of a player: Francis, 
a son, October Z7, 1605; Rebecca, October 11, 1607; Alice, No- 
vember 3, 1 611; and a posthumous son, Alexander, on March zo, 
1614. The register records his burial on February Z5, 1614. In his 
will dated January 3, 1614, he leaves £50 each to Francis, Re- 
becca, and the unborn child, and the residue of his estate to his 
wife. The portion left to the unborn child is stated to be "in the 
hand of my fellowes, as my share of the stock." Two brothers, 
Ellis and John, are also mentioned, and the latter is conjectured 
to be the author of Greene's Tu Quoque. He appoints "my Master 
Hemings," to whom he had probably been apprenticed, and 

lOZ 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Condell as trustees for his children (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 
19^8, p. 856; Collier, Actors, pp. 183-85). 

COOKE, EDWARD. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 1509 and 15 11 (Brewer, L. & 
P. Henry VIII, i. i. p. 15; Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. Z44; 
Chambers, Elix.. Stage, ii. xy^.), 

COOKE, LIONEL. 

In 1583 Lionel Cooke was with Queen Elizabeth's men in 
London, for he is named in a City record that gives the personnel 
of the company at this time (EUz.. Stage, ii. 106). Again in 1588 
he is mentioned in a document concerning the Queen's players for 
the non-payment of 8j-. 4^. subsidy (M.S.C., i. 354). 

COOKE, THOMAS. 

On March 6, 1584, the Earl of Worcester's players were en- 
gaged in a dispute with the authorities at Leicester. In the ac- 
count of the quarrel there is an abstract of the license, dated 
January 14, 1583, of Worcester's men, among whom Thomas 
Cooke is listed (Eliz.. Stage, ii. xix). 

COOKE, WILLIAM. 

Three separate references to "William Cooke" have come down 
to us, which may concern one, two, or three men. The references 
are listed here in chronological order. 

(i) William Cooke owned one-half of one share in the syndi- 
cate that in 1608 leased the Whitefriars playhouse (Adams, 
Playhouses, pp. 313-15). 

(x) William Cooke is mentioned in the examination of 
Richard Bradshaw's players at Banbury in 16x3, when the town 
authorities became suspicious of the validity of the company's 
license (Murray, ii. 106 fF., 163 fF.). From the records it appears 
that Edward Whiting (^.z^.) either had been or was in some way 
connected with Bradshaw's troupe, and that he "let the commis- 

103 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

sion in question to William Cooke and Fluelien Morgan, and 
they two went with it with a puppet-play until they had spent 
all, then they pawned the commission for ^s." Subsequently 
Bradshaw redeemed and bought the commission. 

(3) William Cooke's name appears in a warrant of December 
12., 1635, appointing several of Prince Charles's men as Grooms 
of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 98). 

COOLING, JOHN. 

In Wits Recreations (1640) is printed the following epitaph 
(ii. X38): 

On John Cooling a Player-foole 

Death hath too soon remov'd from us Jo. Cooling, 
That was so well belov'd, and liv'd by fooling. 

CORDEN, GEORGE. 

George Corden, described as servant to the Earl of Leicester, 
visited Coventry on January 9, 1640, with a company composed 
of players from various troupes. They received a payment of 48 j. 
xd. under date of November X5, 1640 (Murray, ii. 5^, 2.54). 

CORNISH, JOHN. 

A Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, and pageant-master of the 
wedding of Prince Arthur and Katherine of Spain in 1501, in 
which two of the children of the Chapel were concealed in mer- 
maids "singing right sweetly and with quaint hermony" (Eliz,. 
Stage, ii. i8, 30«.). 

CORNISH, KIT. 

A "ghost-name," due to the juxtaposition of "kyte" (i.e. 
John Kite, later Archbishop of Armagh) and "Cornisshe" in a 
Chapel record of 1508: "mr kyte Cornisshe and other of the 
Chapell yt played afFore ye king at Richemounte" (iElix.. Stage, 
ii. X9«., 3o«.). 

104 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

CORNISH, WILLIAM. 

Master of the Song School at Westminster in 1479-80 QEliZ' 
Stage, ii. 30^., 70). 

CORNISH, WILLIAM. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1509-2.3 (Wallace, Evolution, pp. 
33-60). 

COWLEY, RICHARD. 

In the plot of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Strange's com- 
pany about 1590, Richard Cowley is cast for several minor parts: 
a lieutenant in the Induction, a soldier and a lord in "Envy," 
Giraldus and a musician in "Sloth," and a lord in "Lechery" 
(Greg, H.P., p. 151; R.E.S., i. 2.6i). He was traveling in the 
provinces with Strange's men in 1593, as shown in the corres- 
pondence between Edward and Joan AUeyn. On August i Alleyn 
wrote to his wife from Bristol, whither a letter from her had been 
brought by Cowley (H.F., p. 36). In March, 1601, he served as 
joint-payee for performances at Court by the Chamberlain's men 
(Steele, pp. iio, iii), which company he may have joined upon 
its formation in 1594. The stage-directions (IV. ii) of the Quarto 
(1600) and the Folio (16^3) texts, where "Cowley" is substi- 
tuted for "Verges," show that he played Verges to Kempe's Dog- 
berry in Much Ado about Nothing, acted by the Chamberlain's men 
probably about 1598. In 1603 the Chamberlain's company passed 
under royal patronage, and Cowley is named in the patent 
granted on May 19, 1603, to the King's men; in the procession 
list of March 15, 1604; and in the 1613 folio list of actors in Shake- 
speare's plays. Augustine Phillipps, in his will dated May 4, 
1605, bequeathed him as a fellow-actor 2.0s. in gold. He lived in 
Holywell Street, and for a short period in Alleyn's Rents, both 
in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, where the registers 
supply the following records of his children (Collier, Actors, pp. 
161-63): Robert (baptized March 8, 1596; buried ?March zo, 

105 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

1597), Cuthbert (baptized May 8, 1597), Richard (baptized April 
i9, 1598; buried February i6, 1603), and Elizabeth (baptized 
February 2., i6oi). His wife's burial is recorded on September 2.8, 
1616, and his own on March ix, 1619. His nuncupative will, 
dated January 13, 1618, appoints his daughter, Elizabeth Birch, 
sole executrix. The will is witnessed by John Heminges, Cuth- 
bert Burbage, John Shank, and Thomas Ravenscroft, the last of 
whom may be the madrigalist (Plomer, Notes and Queries, 1906, 
vi. 369). 

CRANE, JOHN. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314-15). 

CRANE, RALPH. 

Ralph Crane has a place in dramatic history because he was 
scrivener to the King's men in 1619 and perhaps earlier, and was 
still making transcripts of their plays in 1615. He was also a 
writer. His one published book. The Workes of Mercy (i6zi), re- 
published about 16x5 as The Pilgrimes New-yeeres-Gift, is a collec- 
tion of tedious and pious reflections, less readable than the auto- 
biographic induction. The chief sources of our knowledge of his 
life are this biographical preface in verse to The Workes of Mercy, 
the enlarged version of the preface in the latter edition, and the 
dedications of the manuscripts that he presented to his patrons. 
From these sources we learn that he was born in London, and 
that he was the son of a more or less prosperous member of the 
Merchant Taylors' Company. He was brought up to the law; 
served Sir Anthony Ashley seven years as clerk; afterwards wrote 
for the lawyers; escaped the ravages of the plague in the begin- 
ning of the seventeenth century; and began writing poetry late 
in life when he was suffering much from poverty and sickness. 
He employed himself in his later years in copying popular works 
and dedicating his transcripts to well-known persons, in the hope 

106 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

of receiving pecuniary recompense. He is known to have been 
the scribe of the following plays (F. P. Wilson, Library, 19x6, vii. 
195 ff.): Fletcher and Massinger's Sir John van Olden Barnavelt (c. 
1619); Fletcher's Humorous Lieutenant, which Crane entitled 
Demetrius and Enanthe (16x5); Middleton's The Witch (c. 16x0-17); 
and two manuscripts of Middleton's A Game at Chess (16x5). 
From the preface to The Workes of Mercy we get the impression 
that Crane was not a regular employee of the King's men, but 
rather a scribe whose services were sought when occasion de- 
manded : 

And some imployment hath my vsefull Pen 
Had 'mongst those ciuill, well-deseruing men, 
That grace the Stage with honour and delight. 
Of whose true honesties I much could write, 
But will comprise' t (as in a Caske of Gold) 
Vnder the Kingly Seruice they doe hold. 

More detailed accounts of Crane are as follow: F. P. Wilson, 
Library (19x6), vii. 194; T. S. Graves, Stud, in Phil., (19x4), xxi. 
36X; S. L. Lee, D.N.B., xiii. 11. 

CRANE, WILLIAM. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 15x3-45 (Wallace, Evolution, 
pp. 61 ff.). 

CRANWIGGE, JAMES. 

James Cranwigge played his challenge at the Rose on Novem- 
ber 4, 1598, on which occasion Henslowe's share of the profits 
amounted to £x. His name is found nowhere else in theatrical 
records; he may have been only a dancer, a tumbler, or a fencer 
(H.D., i. 98; ii. X54). That the Elizabethan stage was not alto- 
gether sacred to the sock and buskin is shown by Dekker's com- 
ment in his Newes from Hell (1606): "At sword and buckler, 
little Dauy was no bodie to him, and as for Rapier and Dagger, 
the Germane may be his iourneyman. Many the question is, in 
which of the Play-houses he would haue performed his Prize, if it 

107 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

had grown to blowes, and whether the money beeing gathered, 
he would haue cozende the Fencers, or the Fencers him, because 
Hell being vnder euerie one of their Stages, the Players (if they 
had owed him a spight) might with a false Trappe doore haue 
slipt him downe, and there kept him, as a laughing stocke to al 
their yawning Spectators" (Dekker, Non-Dramatic Works, ii. 9x). 

CROSSE, NICHOLAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. iix). 

CROSSE, SAMUEL. 

The name of Samuel Crosse appears in the 162.3 folio list of 
actors in Shakespeare's plays, but in no record of the Chamber- 
lain's or the King's men. He may possibly be identified with the 
Crosse named by Heywood as having flourished before his time, 
i.e. before about 1594 QApology, p. 43). 

CUMBER, JOHN. 

In 1616 John Cumber belonged to Queen Anne's men, for in 
June of that year he is mentioned in the Baskervile papers as a 
member of the company (Elix.. Stage, ii. t-^j). Again in June, 1617, 
he is named in an agreement with Susan Baskervile. On May 13, 
1 61 9, he attended Queen Anne's funeral as a representative of her 
London company. After the Queen's death her London troupe 
was known as the Players of the Revels at the Red Bull, and in 
i6xx Cumber is noted as one of "the chiefe players" in this com- 
pany (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). By May, 16x3, the company 
seems to have disbanded, for on May Z3 of that year Cumber and 
two of his fellows pleaded to be excused from their payments to 
Susan Baskervile, on the ground that the other players bound by 
the original agreement were either dead or with another troupe 
(Murray, i. 199). In 16x3 he was living in Aldermanbury (Wal- 
lace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). He died before June 16, 16x3, for the 
Baskervile papers of this date note him as "newly deceased" 

108 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Fleay, Stage, p. X79). He has been conjectured (Fleay, Drama, 
i. 43) to be the I. C. who wrote The Two Merry Milkmaids, a. play- 
entered in the Stationers' Registers on May ii, 162.0 (Arber, iii. 
674), and printed shortly afterwards "As it was Acted before the 
King, with generall Approbation, by the Companie of the 
Reuels." 

CURTEYS, JAMES. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 1509 and 15 11 (Brewer, L. & 
P. Henry VIII, i. i. p. 15; Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. 144; 
Chambers, Eliz- Stage, ii. xjn.'). 

CUTLER, JAMES. 

A member of the Chapel Royal not later than 1605, as shown 
by a record of October 7, 1605, when holland was provided for 
shirts for the twelve children of the Chapel, and "for James 
Cutler, a Chappell boy gone off" (^Eliz- Stage, ii. 5o«.), 

DAB. 
See Dob. 

DABORNE, ROBERT. 

Robert Daborne appears on January 4, 1610, with Philip 
Rosseter and others, as a patentee for the Children of the Queen's 
Revels at the Whitefriars playhouse (Adams, Playhouses, p. 318). 
He was the author of two extant plays, A Christian Turned Turk, 
printed in i6ii, and The Poor Man s Comfort, printed in 1655; and 
he collaborated w^ith Tourneur, Field, Massinger, and Fletcher. 
At some unknown date he took orders. In 1618 there was pub- 
lished a sermon preached by him at Waterford. He became Chan- 
cellor at Waterford in 1619, Prebendary of Lismore in i6io, and 
Dean of Lismore in i6ii. On March 13, i6x8, he "died am- 
phibious by the ministry" (E/^'i^. Stage, iii. X7o). For other details 
of his life see Greg's Henslowe Papers. 

109 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

DAMPORT, EDWARD. 

Edward Damport was a member of Richard Bradshaw's com- 
pany, when that troupe got into trouble at Banbury in May, 
1633. The town authorities, becoming suspicious of the validity 
of the company's license, arrested the players, and notified the 
Privy Council. The players appeared before the Privy Council in 
June, and were soon discharged "upon bond given to be forth- 
coming whensoever they should be called for." In the examina- 
tion of the players by the Banbury officials, Damport testified 
that he had "gone with the company up and down the country 
playing stage plays these two years last past," and that Edward 
Whiting C^.f.) had been his "old master" (Murray, ii. 106 fF., 
163 ff.). 

DANIEL, JOHN. 

On July 17, 1615, John Daniel, a musician in the service of 
Prince Charles, obtained through the influence of his brother, 
the poet, Samuel Daniel, a patent for the Children of the Queen's 
Chamber of Bristol. The company is not traceable in London; 
but in 1616-17 Daniel brought it to Norwich, where instead of 
being allowed to play he was given a gratuity. By April, 161 8, he 
seems to have assigned his privilege to Martin Slater, John Ed- 
monds, and Nathaniel Clay. Nevertheless, at a later date he ap- 
parently organized another troupe, for the Leicester accounts of 
1614 record a payment of 5J-. ^d. to "John Daniell who had a 
Pattent for the Children of Bristoll" (Murray, ii. 14 fF., 370, 
5fF.,3i6). 

DANIEL, SAMUEL. 

Samuel Daniel, poet, dramatist, and author of masks, became 
connected with the stage through his appointment as official 
censor for the Children of the Queen's Revels. Their patent of 
February 4, 1604, states that all their plays must receive his 
"approbacion and allowaunce." Evidently he took a more active 

no 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

part in the management of the troupe than merely licensing their 
plays, for he served as joint-payee with Evans for performances 
at Court on January i and 3, 1605 (Steele, pp. 141, i4x). His con- 
nection with the troupe probably ceased later in the year, when 
Queen Anne's patronage was withdrawn from the Children as a 
result of their serious offense in acting Eastward Hoe. In 161 5 he 
used his influence in obtaining for his brother, John, a patent for 
the Children of the Queen's Chamber of Bristol (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 
49, 50, 5 z, X72--74)- 

DANIEL, WILLIAM. 

During i6ii-zz a troupe called "the Kings Players" visited 
Canterbury under the leadership of William Daniel. Daniel is 
nowhere else mentioned as associated with the King's players; 
later, however, he appears as a King's Revels man, and thus the 
company referred to in the Canterbury records is doubtless the 
King's Revels. On November z8, 1634, the Master of the Revels 
granted a license to William Daniel, William Hart, John Town- 
send, Samuel Minion, Hugh Haughton, Thomas Doughton, and 
others; their company was known as the King's Revels. With 
Daniel as leader the troupe appeared at Coventry in June, 1635; 
at Norwich on September 3, 1635; at Coventry on April zx and 
December 5, 1636; and at Gloucester in 1636-37 (Murray, ii. 8 ff., 
II, Z31, Z5Z, Z53, Z85, 357). 

DANNER, JOHN. 

John Danner's name appears in a warrant of July z, 16Z9, ap- 
pointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 95). 

DARBIE, RICHARD. 

A player, whose son, Allstide, was baptized at St. Bodolph 
Aldgate on May i, i6oz. He may possibly be identical with 
Richard Darloe (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 99). 

Ill 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

DARLOE, RICHARD. 

See Richard Darlowe. 

DARLOWE, RICHARD. 

Darlowe, who may be identical with Richard Darloe, appeared 
as an attendant in The Dead Mans Fortune, possibly acted by the 
Admiral's men at the Theatre about 1590 (^Eliz.- Stage, ii. 136; 
H.P., p. i5i). The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate supply the 
following records of children of "Richard Darloe, a player" 
(Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 99): Margaret (baptized September 
19, 1595; buried May xi, 1596), Jeane (baptized May 19, 1598; 
buried January x^, 1599), and John (baptized January ^5, 1600; 
buried August Z9, i6ox). 

D'AUNAY, JOSIAS (?). 

Presumably D' Aunay was one of the French players in England 
during 1635 under the leadership of Josias de Soulas, better known 
by his stage-name of Josias Floridor Cq.v.^, as shown by a warrant 
of May 5, 1635, granted to "Josias D' Aunay, Hurfries de Lau, 
and others, for to act playes at a new house in Drury-lane, during 
pleasure" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 61). Lawrence (Eli^. Play- 
house, I9IX, p. 133^-) suggests that "Floridor's real name was 
Josias d' Aunay." A more plausible explanation seems to be the 
suggestion of Adams (Dratn. Rec, p. 6i«.) that a comma should 
be inserted after "Josias." 

DAVENANT, WILLIAM. 

William Davenant (1606-68) on June 2.j, 1640, succeeded 
William Beeston as Governor of the Cockpit Flayers, and under 
his direction the company continued to act at the Cockpit until 
the closing of the playhouses in 16^1. (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 
36i-6i). His subsequent career as theatrical manager and drama- 
tist falls within the period of the Commonwealth and Restora- 
tion, and is here only briefly summarized. His foresight in a 
managerial capacity is notable for several outstanding innova- 

112. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

tions in stage-craft. In the later years of the Commonwealth he 
obtained permission to give a species of quasi-dramatic entertain- 
ments which would be tolerated by the authorities. His first 
performances were at Rutland House; but in 1658 he moved to 
the Cockpit, where The Siege of Rhodes was presented ''sfylo 
recitativo," and "did affect the eie and eare extremely" and "first 
brought scenes in fashion in England; before, at playes, was only 
a hanging" (Aubrey, Lives, i. io8). The Siege of Rhodes is in many 
respects an epoch-making play. The entertainment marks the re- 
establishment of the theatre after Puritan rule; scenery was for 
the first time employed in a play, as distinguished from the 
spectacular masks sponsored by the royalty; the first English 
professional actress appeared, for Mrs. Coleman assumed the part 
of lanthe; and an opera was for the first time produced in England. 
The historical significance of the performance cannot easily be 
overrated. After the Restoration, Davenant continued his work 
as theatrical manager. In August, 1660, he secured a royal patent 
to organize a company of players, and opened at Salisbury Court 
in November of the same year. By the end of June, 1661, the new 
theatre of Lincoln's Inn Fields was completed, and the Duke of 
York's company moved there under the management of Davenant 
(Nicoll, Rest. Drama, p. x83). The star of this troupe was Thomas 
Betterton, whose splendid acting captivated London. Hamlet was 
one of the first plays given at the new playhouse: "Hamlet being 
perform' d by Mr. Betterton, Sir William (having seen Mr. Taylor 
of the Black-Fryars Company act it, who being instructed by the 
author Mr. Shaksepeur) taught Mr. Betterton in every particle 
of it; which by his exact performance of it, gain'd him esteem 
and reputation, superlative to all other plays. . . . No succeed- 
ing tragedy for several years got more reputation or money to the 
company than this" (Downes, Ros. Ang., ed. J. Knight, pp. xviii- 
xxii, 19-2.1). Regardless of a strong prejudice against women 
appearing on the stage, Davenant obtained the insertion of the 
following clause in the patent granted to him: "That, whereas 

113 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the women's parts in plays have hitherto been acted by men in 
the habits of women, of which some have taken offence, we per- 
mit and give leave for the time to come, that all women's parts 
be acted by women" (Davenant, Works, i. p. Ixvii). Another in- 
novation which seems to have been introduced by Davenant was 
the change in the position of the orchestra, which hitherto had 
been placed in an upper balcony. When the alteration of Shake- 
speare's Tempest by Dry den and Davenant was produced at the 
Duke's theatre in Lincoln's Inn Fields in 1667, the orchestra was 
doubtless "for the first time," as conjectured by Collier (H.E.D. 
P., iii. 152.)) placed between the audience and the stage, as shown 
by the description prefixed to the play: "The front of the stage 
opened, and the band of twenty-four violins, with the harpsicals 
and theorbos, which accompany the voices, are placed between 
the pit and the stage" (Davenant, Works, v. 419). Davenant's 
importance in dramatic history is not to be measured by his own 
actual dramatic writings, but rather by the far-reaching and 
powerful forces that he set in motion. And, withal, he kept alive 
through the unauspicious years of the Civil War and Common- 
wealth some memory of a great national dramatic tradition. 

DAVIS, HUGH. 

Hugh Davis appears frequently in Henslowe's Diary as a witness 
between May 8, 1593, evidently an error for 1594 (H.D., ii. 80), 
and November 2.6, 1603. On November 9, 1601, the Admiral's men 
paid js. 6d. for the mending of his tawny coat "which was eaten 
with the rattes." He was therefore in some way connected with 
the Admiral's troupe at the Fortune, and may have been a hired 
man (H.D., ii. X55). 

DAWES, ROBERT. 

Robert Dawes is named in a patent granted on March 30, 1610, 
to the players under the patronage of Prince Charles, then Duke 
of York, and known as the Duke of York's men. After Prince 

114 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Henry's death in November, i6ix, their title became Prince 
Charles's men. Dawes apparently remained with the company 
until about April 7, 1614, when he transferred to the Lady Eliza- 
beth's men, at which time Articles of Agreement were drawn up 
between him and Henslowe and Meade QEliZ- Stage, ii. :l^i., 2.55). 

DAWSON, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

DAY, JOHN. 

A writer signing himself "Dramaticus," in Shakespeare Society's 
Papers, iv. no, describes a copy of Dekker's Shoemaker's Holiday 
with alleged manuscript notes giving the cast of the play as pro- 
duced by the Admiral's men about 1600. To Day is assigned the 
part of Lovell, an officer. Greg discredits the list as "an obvious 
forgery" (H.D., ii. 2.03). John, son of John Day, a player, was 
baptized at St. Saviour's on June 3, 1604 (Eli^. Stage, ii. 313). 

DAY, THOMAS. 

As a member of the Chapel Royal, Thomas Day acted in Jon- 
son's Cynthia" s Revels, 1600, and The Poetaster, 1601 (Elix.. Stage, 
iii. 363, 365). Perhaps he is to be identified with the Thomas Day 
w^ho appears as a musician in the establishment of Prince Henry 
in i6ii, as a Gentleman of the Chapel in 161 5, as organist of 
Westminster and master of the choristers from 16x5 to 1631, and 
as master of the Children of the Chapel Royal in 1637 (Rimbault, 
Old Cheque Book, pp. 8, 2.05). 

DECAYNE, ANDREW. 

See Andrew Cane. 

DENYGTEN, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Downton. 

DICK. 

See "Black Dick." 

115 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

DICK, E. DUTTON'S BOY. 

Dick, E. Dutton's boy, assumed the part of Basilea in Frederick 
and Basilea, acted by the Admiral's men in June, 1597 (H.P., 

P- 153)- 

DISHLEY. 
See Distle. 

DISTLE. 

Distle (Distley, Dishley) seems to have been the leader of a 
company of players under the patronage of Lord Edward Dudley 
from 1610 to about ?i636. He is mentioned in the records as hav- 
ing visited Gawthorpe Hall, Lancashire, on March 13, 1610, 
October 7, i6ix, and March 4, 1613; Leicester, in 162.9; and Don- 
caster, on February 19, ?i636 (Murray, ii. 41 fF., 394, 395, 317, 

2-57)- 

DISTLEY. 
See Distle. 

DOB. 

Dob (or Dab) appeared as a ghost in The Battle of Alcazar, 
acted by the Admiral's men about 1600-01. He is probably identi- 
cal with Dobe of the 1598 inventory of apparel belonging to the 
Admiral's company: "Dobes cotte of cloth and sylver" (H.P., 
pp. 119, 138, 153; Eliz.. Stage, ii. 176). 

DOBE. 
See Dob. 

DOBSON, JOHN. 

John Dobson played Camelion, Rowbone's man, in Shirley's 
Wedding, acted by Queen Henrietta's company about May, 162.6 
(Murray, i. opp. xGG'). 

DONSTALL, JAMES. 
See James Tunstall. 

116 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

DONSTONE, JAMES. 
See James Tunstall. 

DOUBTON, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Downton. 

DOUGHTON, THOMAS. 

As a member of Ellis Guest^s company under license of June 7, 
162.8, Thomas Doughton is recorded at Norwich on July z of the 
same year. He is also named in a license of November x8, 1634, 
granted to a company under the leadership of William Daniel 
C^.v.^ and known as the King's Revels (Murray, ii. 8 fF., 103). 
An identification of him with Thomas Downton would be some- 
what hazardous. 

DOVER, ANTONY. 

Antony Dover is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town (Murray, i. X79-8o). 

DOWGHTON, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Downton. 

DOWLAND, ROBERT. 

See Robert Dulandt. 

DOWLE, ROWLAND. 

Rowland Dowle is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January ix, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 
servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stoipes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

DOWNTON, THOMAS. 

The variants of Thomas Downton's name are numerous: 
Doutone (?), Dowton, Dowghton, Dowten, Doubton, and 

117 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Denygten. There is a letter from John Pyk to Joan Alleyn, un- 
dated but evidently written while Strange's men were traveling 
in the provinces during 1593, which purports to have been written 
by "Mr. Doutone," Conjecture has assigned the letter to Thomas 
Downton, who may have been with Strange's men in 1593 QH. 
P., p. 41; Eliz- Stage, ii. 12.4). By December 14, 1594, he had be- 
come a member of the Admiral's troupe, for his name occurs in a 
list of the company at this date (H.D., i. 5). Subsequently he 
joined the Earl of Pembroke's men, for with several other mem- 
bers of the company he is complainant in a lawsuit during 1597 
against Francis Langley, builder and owner of the Swan play- 
house (Wallace, Eng. Studien, xliii. 340; Adams, Playhouses, pp. 
168-74). -^s a result of the dissolution of Pembroke's company, 
caused by the production of The Isle of Dogs, Downton on October 
6, 1597, bound himself to Henslowe to play with the Admiral's 
men at the Rose, and on October 11 his name is found in the ac- 
counts of the company (H.D., i. 8x, xo3). From this time to 1603 
he appears in the Diary as an Admiral's man. He authorized pay- 
ments on behalf of the company, borrowed various sums from 
Henslowe, paid personal debts, bought a pair of crimson stockings 
from Henslowe, served as a witness to occasional transactions, 
and as a shareholder joined his fellows in acknowledging the 
company's debts. He received 5J-. on December x8, 1597, to give 
to Anthony Munday for his play of Mother Redcap (H.D., i. 70). 
During the Christmas seasons of 1597-98 and 1598-99 he served 
as joint-payee with Robert Shaw for performances at Court by 
the Earl of Nottingham's (Admiral's) men (Steele, pp. 113, 115, 
116). As an Admiral's men he played Abdolmelec in The Battle 
of Alcazar, about 1600-01, and Mango Cham in i Tamar Cam, 
i6oi, and a Tartar in the Procession of the same play (H.P., pp. 
153, 154; Eli^. Stage, ii. 175). His boy performed in Cupid and 
Psyche (1600) and i Tamar Cam (i6ox). About Christmas, 1603, 
the Admiral's men were taken into the service of Prince Henry; 
and on March 14, 1604, Downton and Edward Juby represented 

118 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the Prince's men in their reckoning with Henslowe (H.D., i. 175). 
His name occurs in the coronation list of March 15, 1604; in the 
patent of April 30, 1606; and in the household list of 1610 (Eliz.. 
Stage, ii. 186, 187, 188). The Prince died in November, i6ii, and 
his troupe soon passed under the patronage of the Palsgrave. 
Dow^nton is named in the new patent of January 11, 1613, and in 
the warrant of March 2.^, 161 5, to appear before the Privy Council 
for playing during Lent (M.S.C., i. i75, 371). A lease to him of a 
thirty-second part of the Fortune was drawn up in 1608, but not 
executed. He was a witness to the joint-lease of the Fortune to 
the Palsgrave's men on October 31, 1618 (Warner, pp. 137, 2.43). 
Since he appeared as a witness, rather than as a lessee, he had 
probably at this date retired from the stage. He apparently mar- 
ried a vintner's widow on February 15, 1618, and became a 
vintner (Eliz.- Stage, ii. 313). On August 18, i6ix, he dined with 
Edward Alleyn (Warner, p. 193). The St. Saviour's registers 
supply records of his family, including the baptism of Christo- 
pher, son of Thomas Dowton, "musycyon," on December 17, 
1591; of Thomas Dowton "baseborne, the supposed son of 
Thomas Dowton, a player," on May 15, 1600 (Eliz.- Stage, ii. 
313); "Francis Dowghton, son of Thomas, a player," April 18, 
1597; and of Thomas Dowton, son of Thomas, a player, July ii, 
1601 (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). He may have been 
one of the Dutton family (H.D., ii. 2.65). A copy of acrostic 
verses on Downton's name by one John Day, whom J. F. Herbert 
identifies with the dramatist, is given in Shakespeare Society's 
Papers, i. 19: 

Acrostic Verses upon the Name of his worthie 

friende, Maister Thomas Dowton 

The wealthy treasure of America 

Hid in the vaines and artiers of the earthe, 

Or the riche pearle begotten in the sea, 

Made rounde and oriente in his naturall birthe. 

Are not all valewde, in the eye of arte, 

Soe much (by much) as a compassionate harte. 

119 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Determine, then, to keepe that wealthie mine. 
Of all exchequers in the world the beste : 
Wisdome the quoine, the stamp upon *t devine. 
The man that owes it beares this motto, "Bleste," 
Of all my friendes ('twere shame to wrong desarte) 
Not one of all beares a more passionate harte. 

John Day. 

DOWNTON'S BOY. 

"Downton's boy" played in Cupid and Psyche in June, 1600, and 
assumed the parts of Tarmia's child and of Thia in i Tamar Cam^ 
acted by the Admiral's men in i6ox (H.D., i. ixx; H.P., p. 154). 

DOWTEN, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Downton. 

DOWTON, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Downton. 

DRAKE, ROBERT. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, Eng- 
land^ iv. 314-15). 

DRAYTON, MICHAEL. 

Michael Drayton, poet and dramatist, owned one whole share 
in the syndicate that in 1608 leased the Whitefriars playhouse. 
He seems to have been largely responsible for organizing the 
Children of His Majesty's Revels at Whitefriars. The closing of 
the playhouses by order of King James, followed by a violent 
outbreak of the plague, led to the dissolution of the company soon 
after its organization (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 311-17). 

DREWE, BARTHOLOMEW. 

A player, whose son, George, was baptized at St. Saviour's on 
November 12., 1614 QEliz- Stage, ii. 313). 

ixo 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

DREWE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Drewe (or Drue) belonged to Queen Anne's men in 
1616, for in June of that year he is mentioned in the Baskervile 
papers as a member of the company QEliz. Stage, ii. i-yf). Again 
in June, 1617, he is named in an agreement with Susan Baskervile. 
On October x, 1617, he with others of the Queen's company 
petitioned the Sessions of Peace against the various presentments 
that had been issued against them for not "repayringe the High- 
wayes neere the Red Bull" (Jeaffreson, Middlesex, ii. 170). He 
took part in Queen Anne's funeral on May 13, 1619, as a repre- 
sentative of her London company (Murray, i. 197}. Subsequently 
he appears to have become a playwright (Lawrence, "Found: A 
Missing Jacobean Dramatist," Times Literary Suppl., March X3, 
192.1, p. 191). He is presumably the author of The Life of the 
Duchess of Suffolk, licensed on January 2., 16x4, as "Written by Mr. 
Drew," and published in 163 1 as by Thomas Drue (Adams, 
Dram. Rec, p. 2.7); the T. D. who wrote The Bloody Banquet 
(printed in 1639); and the Drew who appears as joint-author with 
Robert Davenport of The Woman's Mistake, entered in the Sta- 
tioners' Registers on September 9, 1653 (Eyre, i. 42.8), but ap- 
parently never printed. 

DROM, THOMAS. 

Thomas Drom assumed the part of Nemesis in The Battle of 
Alcazar, presented by the Admiral's men about 1600-01 (H.P., 
p. 153; Eliz.. Stage, ii. 175-76). 

DRUE, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Drewe. 

DRUSIANO. 

See Martinelli. 

DUKE, JOHN. 

In 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Strange's men about 1590, 
John Duke played a pursuivant in the Induction, a soldier in 

IXI 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

"Envy," Will Fool in "Sloth," and a lord in "Lechery" (Greg, 
H.P., p. i'^z;R.E.S., i. x6x). Subsequently he joined the Chamber- 
lain's men, for he is named in the list of "principal Comoedians" 
affixed to Jonson's Every Man in his Humor, acted by the Chamber- 
lain's company in 1598. On September xi, 1600, he acknowledged 
a debt of £z to Henslowe, but no mention is made of the company 
with which he was then associated. Nothing more is heard of 
him until August 18, i6ox, when he authorized payments for 
Worcester's men from this date to May 9, 1603 (H.D., i. i3x, 
179, 190). Early in the reign of James I Worcester's men became 
Queen Anne's company, and on February 19, 1604, Duke was 
paid for two plays performed by the Queen's men before Prince 
Henry on the previous January i and 13 (Steele, pp. 135, 137). 
He is named in a list of the Queen's men who took part in the 
coronation procession of March 15, 1604. On February 19, 1605, 
and April 30, 1606, he again served as payee for performances by 
the Queen's men at Court (Steele, pp. 141, 149). His name occurs 
in both the license of April 15, 1609, and the duplicate patent 
issued on January 7, i6ii, to the traveling company under the 
patronage of Queen Anne. He seems to have been with the 
Queen's men at Norwich on May 6, 1615, and May 31, 1617, 
since his name is given in the abstracts of the license in the town 
records (Murray, i. 189; ii. 340, 343). He lived for a time in 
Holywell Street, a section of London where numerous actors 
resided, and had four children baptized at St. Leonard's, Shore- 
ditch, at various dates between July, 1604, and January, 1609 
(Collier, Actors, p. xxxi). 

DULANDT, ROBERT. 

Robert Dulandt (Dowland?) was a musician in Germany in the 
service of Philip Julius, Duke of Wolgast, during 1613. In a peti- 
tion dated August 30, 1613, he asked permission, with his fel- 
lows, Richard Jones and Johan Kostressen, to leave Wolgast and 
return to England (Meyer, Jahrbuch, xxxviii. 109). 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

DUTTON, EDWARD. 

In the performance of Frederick and Basilea by the Admiral's 
men in June, 1597, Edward Dutton appeared as Philippo QH.P., 
p. 153). His boy, Dick, also had a part in the play. On July 18, 
1597, he borrowed money from Henslowe (H.D., i. xoo). During 
i6oo-oi children of his were baptized at St. Saviour's: Sara, 
January 16, 1600; Susan, October i, 1600; Prudence, April 16, 
iGo-L (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 192.8, p. 856). 

DUTTON, JOHN. 

John Dutton in 1575-76 was a player in the Earl of Warwick's 
company, as shown by a payment to him, his brother Lawrence, 
and Jerome Savage, for plays presented at Court during the 
Christmas season of 1575-76 (Steele, pp. 57, 58). On Arpil 13, 
1580, Lawrence Dutton (j^.v.') is spoken of as servant to the Earl 
of Oxford, and before this date John had also doubtless trans- 
ferred himself from the Warwick to the Oxford troupe, for some 
satirical lines (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 98) describe how the "Duttons and 
theyr fellow-players, forsakyng the Erie of Warwycke theyr 
mayster, became followers of the Erie of Oxford," and as a result 
were called, instead of comedians, chameleons. John became 
associated with Queen Elizabeth's men when the troupe was first 
established in 1583, and is named in a London record that gives 
the personnel of the company at this time (EUz.. Stage, ii. 106). 
That he remained with the Queen's men is shown by the fact that 
he is mentioned in a document of June 30, 1588, concerning the 
non-payment of subsidy by certain members of the company 
(M.S.C., i. 354). In 1588-89 he and his brother Lawrence were 
the leaders of the Queen's men on their visit to Nottingham 
(Murray, ii. 375}. With John Laneham on March 15, 1590, and 
with Lawrence Dutton on March 7, 1591, he served as payee for 
performances at Court by the Queen's company (Steele, pp. 99, 
100). Elizabeth, daughter of John Dutton, a player, was baptized 
at St. Botolph's on July 3, 1586. Lincoln's Inn paid him for 

12-3 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

musicians in 1567-68. As a Court Messenger, a John Dutton re- 
ceived payment on May x}, 1578, for carrying letters to Antwerp 
QEUz^. Stage, ii. 314). 

DUTTON, LAWRENCE. 

Lawrence Dutton was connected successively with companies 
under the patronage of Sir Robert Lane, 1571-71, the Earl of 
Lincoln (Lord Clinton), 1571-75, and the Earl of Warwick, 1575- 
76, as shown by warrants for payments for performances at Court 
during these years (Steele, pp. 39, 41, 45, 48, 57, 58, 59). By April 
13, 1580, he had joined the Earl of Oxford's men, for on that date 
the Privy Council committed him and Robert Leveson, servants 
to the Earl of Oxford, to the Marshalsea for taking part in an 
affray with certain gentlemen of the Inns of Court (Dasent, xi. 
445). Judging from their frequent shifting from one company to 
another, we may assume that the Duttons (John and Lawrence) 
were of an unstable temperament, an assumption that is further 
evidenccJ by some contemporary verses that emphasize their 
chameleon-like character (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 98): 

The Duttons and theyr fellow-players forsakyng the Erie of Warwycke 
theyr tnayster, became followers of the Erie of Oxford, and wrot them- 
selves his COMOEDIANS, which certayne Gentlemen altered and 
made CAMOELIONS. The Duttons, angry with that, compared 
themselves to any gentleman; therefore these armes were devysed for 
them: 

The fyeld, a fart durty, a gybbet crosse-corded, 

A dauncing Dame Flurty of all men abhorred; 

A lyther lad scampant, a roge in his ragges, 

A whore that is rampant, astryde wyth her legges, 

A woodcocke displayed, a calfe and a sheepe, 

A bitch that is splayed, a dormouse asleepe; 

A vyper in stynche, la part de la drut. 

Spell backwarde this Frenche and cracke me that nut. 

Parcy per pillery, perced with a rope. 

To sly the the more lytherly anoynted with sope; 

A coxcombe crospate in token of witte, 

12.4 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Two eares perforate, a nose wythe slytte. 

Three nettles resplendent, three owles, three swallowes, 

Three mynstrellmen pendent on three payre of gallowes, 

Further sufficiently placed in them 

A knaves head, for a difference from all honest men. 

The wreathe is a chayne of chaungeable red. 
To show they ar vayne and fickle of head; 
The creste is a lastrylle whose feathers ar blew. 
In signe that these fydlers will never be trew; 
Whereon is placed the home of a gote. 
Because they ar chast, to this is theyr lotte, 
For their bravery, indented and parted, 
And for their knavery innebulated. 

Mantled lowsy, wythe doubled drynke. 
Their ancient house is called the Clynke; 
Thys Posy they beare over the whole earthe, 
Wylt please you to have a fyt of our mirthe? 
But reason it is, and heraultes allowe welle, 
That fidlers should beare their armes in a towelle. 



John Dutton Ql-v^ was a Queen's man in 1583 and 1588, and 
we should expect to find the name of Lawrence in the lists with 
that of his brother; but nothing further is known of Lawrence 
until 1589, w^hen he and John were associated in the leadership 
of the Queen's company at Nottingham (Murray, ii. 375). On 
March 7, 15 91, the two brothers served as payees for performances 
at Court by the Queen's men (Steele, p. 100). In October, 1588, 
and June, 1590, when the Queen's players w^ere also present, a 
"Mr. Dutton" is recorded as having visited Latham House and 
Knowsley Hall, Lancashire (Murray, ii. 2.^G, ^97); but his con- 
nection, if any, with the company is not apparent. In contem- 
porary records are found other notices of a Lawrence Dutton," 
which conjecture tends to identify with the player; but nothing 
definite has been established. As a Court Messenger, a Lawrence 
Dutton was paid for "sondry jorneys" in i56i-6i (Eli'^. Stage, ii. 
314); and he, or another of the same name, was from October, 

12.5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS • 

1576, to July, 1581, a regular Messenger of the Chamber in the 
service of the Privy Council (Dasent, ix. ±z.t,; x. 2.13, zx8; xi. 391, 
4x3, 437; xii. 2.x, i3, 43; xiii. 135). On May x8, 1592., the Council 
recommended John, the son of Lawrence Dutton who had "of 
long tyme served her Majestic" as messenger, for admission as a 
Queen's Scholar at Westminster School (Dasent, xxii. 493). This 
Lawrence was apparently not the player, for he was serving as 
messenger on May xo, 1580 (Dasent, xii. X3), whereas the player 
had been committed to the Marshalsea on April 13 for partici- 
pating in an affray with certain persons of the Inns of Court, and 
the matter was not referred to the judges for examination until 
May x6 (Dasent, xi. 445; xii. 37). In the reign of Edward VI 
(about 155X) a Thomas Dutton was employed as a government 
post between the Privy Council and Thomas Gresham, who was 
on official business in Antwerp; and the same Dutton appears 
about 1571 as Gresham's agent at Hamburg (Burgon, Gresham, i. 
109; ii. 4x1). Also, the names John and Lawrence occur in the 
records of the house of Dutton of Dutton, which had an ancient 
and hereditary privilege for the licensing of minstrelsy in Cheshire 
QEUz.- Stage, i. x8o, X99; iv. X71; Med. Stage, ii. 2.59). 

EARLE,JOHN. 

John Earle in 1640 was a hired man of Prince Charles's com- 
pany. In an order of April X5, 1640, he is named as a Prince's man 
who is not "to be hindered or diverted in his service by being 
impressed, arrested, or otherwise molested, without leave first 
asked" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). 

EATON, WILLIAM. 

William Eaton appears as payee with Gilbert Reason for 
Prince Charles's provincial troupe at Coventry on December X3, 
i6xx. He can not improbably be identified with the William Eyton 
of Ellis Guest's company, that was granted a license on June 7, 
16x8, and visited Norwich on July x of the same year (Murray, 
ii, 103, X49). 

1x6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ECCLESTONE, WILLIAM. 

As a King's man William Ecclestone assumed parts in The 
Alchemist (1610) and Catiline (161 1). He belonged to the Lady 
Elizabeth's troupe by August 19, 1611, when he and his fellow- 
actors gave Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" 
of agreement (H.P., pp. 18, m), and with this company in 1613 
he played in The Honest Maris Fortune (Eliz,. Stage, ii. X5i). Ap- 
parently later in the same year he again joined the King's men, 
for his name is in the actor-list of Bonduca, presented by that com- 
pany in 1613-14. He is named as a King's man (M.S.C., i. i8o; 
Murray, i. opp. ijx) in the patent of March xy, 1619; in the 
livery-allowance lists of May 19, 1619, and April 7, i6xi; in the 
16x3 folio list of performers in Shakespeare's plays; and in the 
casts of the following Beaumont and Fletcher plays: Bonduca 
(161 3-14), The Loyal Subject (161 8), The M.ad hover (c. 161 8), The 
Humorous Lieutenant Qc. 1619), The Custom of the Country (c. 1619- 
zo), Women Pleased (c. 162.6), The Little French Laivyer Qc. 162.0), 
The Island Princess (c. 162.0), The Laws of Candy (c. 1619-2.1), The 
Sea Voyage (i6zi), and The Spamish Curate (i6zz). Nicholas Tooley 
in his will dated June 3, 16x3, forgave him a debt. He is conjec- 
tured to be the "William Eglestone" w^hose marriage to Anne 
Jacob is entered in the register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, on 
February zo, 1603 (Collier, Actors, pp. Z41, Z45). He is not named 
in the patent of June Z4, 16Z5, by which date he had probably 
retired from the stage or was dead. It has been suggested that he 
may be the "W. E." who wrote the following commendatory 
verses to The Wild-goose Chase, published in 165Z by John Lowin 
and Joseph Taylor (Beaumont and Fletcher, Works, iv. 410): 

An Epigram upon the long lost and fortunately recovered Wild-goose 
Chase, and as seasonably bestowed on Mr. John Lowen and Mr. 
Joseph Taylor, for their best advantage. 

In this late dearth of wit, when Jose and Jack 
Were hunger-bit for want of fowl and Sack; 
His nobleness found out this happy meanes 

1Z7 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

To mend their dyet with these Wild-Goose scenes. 
By which he hath revived in a day 
Two Poets, and two Actors with one Play. 

W. E. 

EDMANS, JOHN. 

See John Edmonds. 

EDMONDS, JOHN. 

About April, 1618, John Edmonds is named as a Queen Anne's 
man in a Letter of Assistance granting Martin Slater, Nathaniel 
Clay, and Edmonds permission to play as "her Majesties ser- 
vants of her Royall Chamber of Bristol." On May 13, 1619, he 
attended the Queen's funeral with his fellow-actors (Murray, i. 
196-97; ii. 5 f.). The marriage of a John Edmonds and Margaret 
Goodyere on February X2., 1600, and the baptism of children of 
John Edmonds, a player, between January 6, 1605, and July 17, 
161 5, are recorded in the registers of St. Saviour's (Elix.- Stage, 
ii. 315). But there was also a John Edmans (or Edmonds) as 
joint-legatee with Robert Goughe in the w^ill, dated July 12., 
1603, of Thomas Pope, who left them his wearing apparel and 
arms (Collier, Actors, p. 1x7). Another legatee in the will was 
Mary Clarke, who, with Thomas Bromley, received Pope's 
shares in the Curtain and the Globe playhouses. And subse- 
quently, Edmans seems to have married his fellow-legatee, for 
an interest in the Globe, similar to that formerly held by Pope, 
was in the hands of John and Mary Edmonds and Basil Nicoll 
(Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 3 fF.). A John Edmonds was buried at 
St. Saviour's, Southwark, on September xo, 1634 (Bentley, 
T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). 

EDWARDS, RICHARD. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1561-66, and author of various 
plays (Wallace, Evolution, pp. 106-16). 

EGLESTONE, WILLIAM. 

See William Ecclestone. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

EICHELIN. 

A company played at Nordlingen, Germany, in 1604, under the 
leadership of one Eichelin, apparently a German, whose reper- 
tory included a Romeo and Juliet and a Pyramus and Thisbe. This 
troupe has been conjectured to be the Blackwood-Thare com- 
bination that appeared at the Frankfort Easter fair in 1603; 
but the connection has not been established (Herz, pp. 43, 65). 

ELDERTON, WILLIAM. 

One Elder ton, dressed as a fool, appeared as one of the Lord of 
Misrule's sons in the Christmas festivities of i55i-53 at the 
Court of Edward VI (Feuillerat, Edw. <& Mary, p. ixo). He may 
be identical with the Elderton who brought the Eton boys to 
Court on January 6, 1573, and the William Elderton who brought 
the Westminster boys to Court on January i, 1574 (Steele, pp. 
44, 47, 48). He has also been conjectured to be the bibulous 
ballad-writer who was frequently satirized by his contemporary 
pamphleteers. Little seems to be known of his life, for the refer- 
ences to him, though numerous, are chiefly concerned with his 
intemperate habits. Lyly (Papfe with an Hatchet, 1589) speaks of 
his "rimes lying a steepe in ale" (Works, iii. 398); Nashe (Pierce 
Pennilesse, 1592.) says that he "consumd his ale-crammed nose 
to nothing" (Works, i. 197); and Harvey (Foure Letters, 1592.) 
writes that "Rayling was the Ypocras of the drunken rimester" 
(Works, i. 163). He was a popular and voluminous composer of 
ballads, and some of his writing is valuable for the light it 
throws on the news-gathering activities of the ballad-mongers; 
but only a small proportion of his work has been preserved. 
Some of his ballads are reprinted in Collier, Old Ballads; H. Huth, 
Ancient Ballads and Broadsides; and H. L. Collman, Ballads and 
Broadsides. A "master Eldertun" was a justice at the Guildhall in 
the coining case of i56z (Machyn, Diary, p. zgo); and Stow speaks 
of a William Elderton as an attorney in the sheriff's court at the 
Guildhall about 1568 (Survey, i. 172.). When Foure Letters Con- 

1x9 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

futed^^s published in 1591, Elderton appears to have been dead, 
for Nashe refers to him as being "as dead as dead beere," and al- 
ludes to his ghost (Works, i. x8o). A more detailed account of 
Elderton by H. E. Rollins may be found in Studies in Philology 
(19^0), xvii. 199. 

ENGLISH, JOHN. 

John English was a Court Interluder in 1494, and his name is 
traceable in the accounts up to 153 1. Henry VII had four players 
of interludes, who received each an annual fee of £3 Gs. 8d., with 
special awards when they played before the King. When their 
services were not required at Court, they traveled in the provinces, 
as did the minstrels of the royal establishment. In 1494 English 
appears to have been the leader of the company of interluders, 
which included Edward May, Richard Gibson, and John Ham- 
mond. In 1503 the interlude players of Henry VII, with English 
as leader, accompanied the Princess Margaret to Scotland for 
her wedding with James IV at Edinburgh, where they "did their 
devoir" before the Scottish Court. After the death of Henry VII 
in 1509 the royal troupe was continued under the patronage of 
Henry VIII; and English, as a performer of experience and emi- 
nence, remained at the head of the company, apparently with a 
salary of £6 13/. ^d. He is often individually mentioned in the 
documents, and appears as leader of the interluders until 1531 
(Collier, i. 44, 45, 49, 79, 96, 113; Chambers, Med. Stage, ii. 187). 

ERRINGTON, RICHARD. 

In i6iz Richard Errington appears at Norwich as manager of a 
company under the patronage of King James. This company was 
doubtless a provincial one, for Errington is not mentioned in 
the lists of the King's troupe in London (Murray, ii. 6fF., 371). 
Shortly after the accession of Charles I in 16x5, some members 
of the company united with the players at the Red Bull (cf. 
Adams, Playhouses, pp. 301 f.). In November, 1617, the troupe 
visited Ludlow, and while the players were performing at an 

130 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

inn, at about ten or eleven o'clock on the night of November 2.1, 
five or six drunken men caused a disturbance. Errington, who vvras 
serving as gatherer at the door, fearing an attack, "took his 
money out the boxe and putt ytt in his hand." Another player 
appeared at the door and demanded the cause of the noise. Where- 
upon one Powell drew his rapier and attempted to stab Errington. 
William Baker, the town sergeant, then sought to restore peace, 
and was seized by the drunken men, dragged through the streets, 
and given a severe beating. The next day Errington was called 
before the town authorities! to report the trouble. In his de- 
position he is described as "of the Citty of London, pewterer, 
aged 50 yeares or thereaboute" (Murray, ii. 3x6). Subsequently, he 
left the Red Bull company, for on July 15, 1631, a license was 
granted to him and Ellis Guest; and their troupe visited Reading 
on July 18. This troupe seems to have been later taken under the 
patronage of Queen Henrietta as her traveling company, for 
when the men visited Norwich on June zz, 1633, they were desig- 
nated as "the Quenes players" (Murray, ii. 104, 354, 386-87). 
The company probably disbanded in 1635, since it is not men- 
tioned after that year; and on April 2.x, 1636, Errington is recorded 
at Coventry as joint-payee for William Daniel's King's Revels 
players (Murray, ii. 9, 2.52.). 

ESTOTEVILLE, GEORGE. 

George Estoteville in 1640 belonged to Beeston's Boys at the 
Cockpit in Drury Lane. Early in May, 1640, Beeston allowed 
his boys to act without license a play that gave great offense to 
King Charles L As a result, on May 3, Beeston, Estoteville, "and 
the rest of the Company of Players at the Cockpit in Drury Lane" 
were ordered to stop playing until further notice from the Master 
of the Revels (Murray, i. 369). Estoteville contributed commend- 
atory verses to Thomas Heywood's Nine Worthy Women (1640), 
in which he expressed astonishment at the poet's continued pro- 
ductivity: 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Will neither rugged time or vast expence 
Of thy unfathom'd fancy and cleare sence 
Perswade thee to leave off, but thou wilt still 
Make all 'twixt heaven and hell flow from thy Quill? 

EVANS, GOULDWAIS. 

The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records on August 13, 
1619, the baptism of William, son of Gouldwais Evans, "a 
musitoan" (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). 

EVANS, HENRY. 

Henry Evans, a Welsh scrivener, was lessee of the First Black- 
friars playhouse in 1583 and of the Second Blackfriars from 1600 
to 1608 (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 107, ioi-i3). He served as payee 
for Agamemnon and Ulysses, presented at Court by Oxford's 
troupe on December 2.-/, 1584 (Steele, p. 91). In 1600 he "set up" 
the Children of the Chapel Royal at Blackfriars, and was as- 
sociated in their management until about 1603, when the com- 
pany became known as the Children of the Queen's Revels, for 
which he served as joint-payee with Samuel Daniel for per- 
formances at Court on January i and 3, 1605 (Eli^. Stage, ii. 41- 
50; Steele, pp. 141, 14^). In 1582. he had been overseer to the will 
of Sebastian Westcott, Master of the Children of St. Paul's 
CEliZ- Stage, ii. i5«.). 

EVESEED, HENRY. 

Henry Eveseed belonged to the Children of the Chapel Royal 
for some time before November 30, 1585, on which date he was 
sworn in as a Gentleman of the Chapel. He appears to have died 
on November 18, 1614 (Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. 2.54, ^58). 

EYDTWARTT, JOHN. 

A player with Robert Reynolds's company at Torgau, Ger- 
many, in 16x7 (Herz, p. 31). 

EYTON, WILLIAM. 

See William Eaton. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

FARMER, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

FARNABY, RICHARD. 

Richard Farnaby, son of the composer Giles Farnaby, was a 
musician in Germany about i6x3-x4, at the Court of Philip 
Julius, Duke of Wolgast QsAeyer, Jahrbuch, xxxviii. xo^i Fellowes, 
Eng. Madg. Composers, p. X33). 

FARRANT, RICHARD. 

Master of the Children of Windsor, 1564-80; Acting Master 
of the Children of the Chapel Royal, and lessee of the First Black- 
friars playhouse, 1576-80 (Chambers, Eli^. Stage, ii. 36; Adams, 
Playhouses, pp. 91-110). 

FENN, EZEKIEL. 

Ezekiel Fenn (Fen or Phen) played Sophonisba in Nabbes's 
Hannibal and Scifio, acted in 1635 by Queen Henrietta's men at 
the Cockpit in Drury Lane (Murray, i. opp. z66'). His name ap- 
pears at the close of the Epilogue to The Witch of Edmonton (Dek- 
ker. Works, iv. 4x8). Since the Epilogue is spoken by Winnifrede, 
Sir Arthur Clarington's maid, we may infer that the part was 
acted by Fenn. The play, not printed until 1658, may have passed 
from Prince Charles's men to Queen Henrietta's company about 
16x5, when the latter troupe was organized (Murray, i. X36«.). 
When the Queen's men disbanded early in 1637, Fenn doubtless 
joined Beeston's Boys, for on May ix, 1637, he and other mem- 
bers of Beeston's company were summoned before the Privy 
Council for playing at the Cockpit during plague quarantine 
(M..S.C., i. 39x). Henry Glapthorne in his Poems (1639) gives a 
"Prologue" entitled. For Ezekiel Fen at his first Acting a Mans 
Part, in which he compares Fenn's trepidation at his debut in a 
masculine role to a merchant's fear on launching an untried 
vessel (Plays and Poems, ii. 196). 

133 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

The verses imply that Fenn was accustomed to the imperson- 
ation of female characters, an implication supported by his playing 
Sophonisba and Winnifrede in the above plays; and although he 
seems to have subsequently changed to male characterizations 
we have no record of his later appearances on the stage. 

FERRABOSCO, ALFONSO. 

"Alfruse FerraboUe and the rest of the Italian players" re- 
ceived payment for a performance at Court on February xy, 1576 
(Steele, p. 59). The entry no doubt refers to Alfonso Ferrabosco, 
the eminent Italian musician who lived in England during the 
sixteenth century. He appears to have already won the favor 
of the English Court by i^6z, when he was granted an annuity 
of 100 marks. With various interruptions he remained in the 
service of Elizabeth until 1578, when he came under the patron- 
age of the Duke of Saxony. His son and grandson in turn con- 
tributed to the gaiety of thejacobean and Caroline courts (Grove's 
Diet. Music, ii. zi ff.). 

FERRET, JAMES. 

James Ferret is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permis- 
sion to act in that town (Murray, i. Z79-8o). 

FERRIS, DAVID. 

Under a license dated November 10, 16x9, David Ferris is 
named as a member of the Red Bull company that appeared at 
Reading on November 30 of the same year (Murray, ii. 386). 

FETHERSON, WILLIAM. 

An unlicensed player of Danby, Yorkshire, in 1612. QEliz- 
Stage, i. 305«.). 

FIDGE, WILLIAM. 

William Fidge may have been a player, as suggested by a record 
of 1 571, when with one Whetstone he owed Robert Betts, a de- 

134 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ceased Canterbury painter, 35^. 4^. "for their portions in buy- 
inge of certen playe-bookes" (Plomer, Library, 1918, ix. 2.52.). 

FIELD, HENRY. 

Henry Field is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town (Murray, i. 2.79-80). 

FIELD, NATHAN. 

Nathan Field was baptized at St. Giles's, Cripplegate, on 
October 7, 1587 (Collier, iii, 4x5). He was the son of John Field, 
a Puritan preacher who was an ardent opponent of the stage. 
John, in 1583, saw a judgment of God in the collapse of the Bear 
Garden on a Sunday, and published a vehement attack upon all 
theatrical performances, entitled, A Godly Exhortation by Occasion 
of the Late Judgment of God, Shewed at T arris-Garden the Thirteenth 
Day of Januarie. If John Field, who died in 1588, had lived to 
mold the life of his son, dramatic history would no doubt have 
been deprived of one of its most interesting figures. Nathan has 
been the subject of much controversy. Collier, finding that 
another son of John Field had been baptized "Nathaniel" on 
June 13, 1 5 81, and not allowing for the idiosyncrasies of the 
puritanical theologian who might well call his sons by the 
easily-confused names of "Nathan" and "Nathaniel" (Field 
already had sons named "John" and "Jonathan"), assumed that 
Nathaniel must have died before the birth of Nathan. This as- 
sumption led to the error that accredits to Nathan Field the 
double life of actor and bookseller. Contemporary pros and cons 
of the argument are detailed by Greg (Times Lit. SuppL, April 15, 
19x6, p. 183, and June 3, 19x6, p. 374) and Baldwin (Mod. Lang. 
Notes, 19x6, xli. 3X, and Times Lit. Supfl., May X7, 19x6, p. 355); 
a more recent article by Miss Brinkley QMod. Lang. Notes, 19x7, 
xlii. 10) corroborates Greg's view that Nathan the player is 
distinct from Nathaniel the stationer. Nathaniel did not die in 

135 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

infancy, as Collier supposed, but was apprenticed to Ralph Jack- 
son, stationer, at Michaelmas, 1596, took up his freedom on 
June 3, 1 61 1, and became a publisher. He issued some books 
during 16x4-17, and seems to have dealt chiefly in theological 
literature, including sermons by a third brother, Theophilus 
Field, Bishop of LlandafF (McKerrow, Dictionary, p. loi). When 
his brother registered as an apprentice in 1596 Nathan was not 
yet nine years old, whereas fifteen or sixteen was the customary 
age of apprenticeship in the Stationers' Company. Until some 
one produces evidence either that Nathaniel, whom Collier un- 
reasonably murdered in infancy, died before 1587, or that 
Nathan was ever a printer or publisher, we must regard the two 
brothers as distinct persons in their respective professions of 
publishing and acting. About 1600, at the age of thirteen, Nathan 
was impressed to join the Children of the Chapel Royal at Black- 
friars. At this time, as shown by Clifton's complaint in 1601, 
he was a "scholler of a gramer schole in London, kepte by one 
Mr. Monkaster" (Wallace, Blackjriars, p. 80), i.e. St. Paul's 
Grammar School under the mastership of Richard Mulcaster. 
He also received instruction from Ben Jonson, who in 1619 told 
William Drummond of Hawthornden that "Nid Field was his 
schollar, and he had read to him the Satyres of Horace, and some 
Epigrames of Martiall" (Conversations, cd. Patterson, p. 15). From 
1600 to 1613 he was a member of the Chapel Royal, after 1603 
designated as the Queen's Revels, or Children of the Revels. His 
name appears in the casts of Cynthia's Revels (1600), The Poetaster 
(1601), and Eficoene, which, according to the folio of 161 6, was 
acted in 1609. He possibly acted Humphrey in The Knight of the 
Burning Pestle (c. 1610), for the Citizen's Wife asks (I. ii. x'y): 
"Were you never one of Master Moncaster's scholars?" In March, 
1613, there was an amalgamation of the Queen's Revels, under 
the management of Philip Rosseter, and the Lady Elizabeth's 
men, under Philip Henslowe; and Field, as leader of the com- 
bined troupe under the patronage of the Lady Elizabeth, repre- 

136 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

sented the company in an agreement with Henslowe and Meade 
(H.P., pp. X3 fF.)- The 1679 folio of Beaumont and Fletcher names 
Field as one of the "principal actors" in The Coxcomb and The 
Honest Man s Fortune, both of which were probably acted by the 
Lady Elizabeth's company in 1613 (Eliz,. Stage, ii. i5i). In Bar- 
tholomew Fair (V. iii), presented by the Lady Elizabeth's company 
in 1614, Jonson pays him a high compliment by coupling him with 
Burbage and introducing his name as synonymous with "best 
actor" (Works, iv. 48x): 

Cokes. Which is your Burbage now? 

Leatherhead. What mean you by that, sir? 

Cokes. Your best actor, your Field? 

Littlewit. Good, i'faith! you are even with me, sir. 

The part of Littlewit was presumably taken by Field himself. 
The Articles of Grievance against Henslowe in 161 5 seem to 
imply that Field was suspected of accepting bribes from Hen- 
slowe to promote the interest of the manager rather than that 
of the players (H.P., p. 88). The suspicion may have been un- 
warranted; but certainly his financial difficulties necessitated his 
appealing to Henslowe on more than one occasion (H.P., pp. 
GG, 67, 84). On June 11, 161 5, he served as payee for Bartholomew 
Fair, which had been presented at Court by the Lady Elizabeth's 
men (Steele, p. 189). During 1615 there seems to have been some 
kind of fusion of Prince Charles's company and the Lady Eliza- 
beth's men, but Field does not appear in the combined troupes. 
The friction noted in the Articles of Grievance may account for 
his withdrawal. Subsequently, possibly in 161 5, he joined the 
King's men. He appears as a King's man in the actor-lists of the 
following Beaumont and Fletcher plays (Murray, i. opp. i7x): 
The Queen of Corinth (c. 1617), The Knight of Malta (c. 161 8), The 
Mad Lover (c. 161 8), and The Loyal Subject (161 8). His name is 
also given in the 162.3 folio list of performers in Shakespeare's 
plays; in the patent of March t.j, 1619; and in the livery-allowance 
list of May 19, 1619. His connection with the King's company 

137 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

apparently lasted only about four years, for he is neither among 
the players named in the stage-directions to Sir John van Olden 
Barnavelt, of August, 1619, nor in the livery allowance of April 
7, 1 62.1. And recent evidence shows that he died between May 
19, 1619, when his name is given in the livery allowance, and 
August 2., i6io, when Letters of Administration were issued to 
his sister; that he was a bachelor; and that he was a resident of 
the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate (Brinkley Mod. Lang. Notes, 
19x7, xlii. 13): 

The second day (of August 162.0) a commission was granted 
to Dorcas Rise otherwise Feild natural and lawful sister of Nathan 
Feild late of the parish of Saint Giles in the county of Middlesex 
bachelor deceased having etc. to administer the good rights and 
credits of the deceased etc. sworn. 

Moreover, the same article clarifies the distinction between the 
two brothers with similar names but entirely different pro- 
fessions, for on March x6, 1633, Anne Field received a com- 
mission for the administration of the goods of her husband, 
Nathaniel, whose burial is recorded in the register of St. Anne, 
Blackfriars, on February xo, 1633, and whose children (Collier, 
iii. 436-38) are recorded in the same parish (Brinkley, Mod. 
Lang. Notes, 19x7, xlii. 14): 

On the z6th of March i63x [1633] Letters of Administration 
were granted to Anne Feild relict of Nathaniel Feild late of the 
parish of Saint Anne Blackfryers London intestate deceased to 
administer the goods credits chattels etc. of the said deceased, etc. 

Field was the author of two excellent plays, A Woman is a 
Weathercock (i6ii) and Amends for Ladies (161 6). In the address 
"To the reader" of the former play, he writes: "If thou hast 
anything to say to me, thou know'st where to hear of me for a 
yeer or two, and no more, I assure you" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xi. 7, 
8), which has been taken to mean that he had no intention of 
spending his life on the stage. Besides the two plays published 
under his name alone, he collaborated with Massinger in The 

138 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Fatal Dowry (i63z), a King's men's play that probably dates 
from 1616-19. The Henslowe papers (H.P., pp. 65 ff., 84) show 
him also as a collaborator with Daborne, Fletcher, and Mas- 
singer in plays for the Lady Elizabeth's troupe, which has led 
to the conjecture that he possibly had a share in the authorship 
of several of the plays belonging to the Beaumont and Fletcher 
series. He also, about 1609-10, contributed a commendatory poem 
(Beaumont and Fletcher, Works, ii. 519) of thirty-six lines to 
The Faithful Shepherdess, with the address, "To my lov'd friend 
M. John Fletcher, on his Pastorall," in which he expresses the 
hope that his own "muse in swathing clowtes" may rise "to 
perfect such a work as" Fletcher's, — 

Clad in such elegant proprietie 
Of words, including a mortallitie. 

And in 161 6, about the time that he joined the King's men, he 
entered the controversial field of writing with a defense of the 
stage, which took the form of a remonstrance to the Reverend 
NIr. Sutton for his disloyalty in denouncing the players who are 
patronized by the King. The tractate is entitled Fetid the Players 
Letter to Mr. Sutton, Preacher att St. Mary Overs (Halliwell-Phil- 
lipps. Illustrations, p. 115). Field was obviously susceptible to 
the charms of Aphrodite, as evidenced by a punning epigram pre- 
served in various Jacobean and Caroline commonplace books, 
apparently referring to his "too much familiarity" with "the 
Lady May" (Collier, iii. 434): 

Field, the Player, on his Aiistress, the Lady May 

It is the fair and merry month of May, 

That clothes the Field in all his rich array. 

Adorning him with colours better dyed 

Than any king can wear, or any bride. 

But May is almost spent, the Field grows dun 

With too much gazing on that May's hot sun; 

And if mild Zephirus, with gentle wind. 

Vouchsafe not his calm breath, and the clouds kind 

Distil their honey-drops, his heat to 'lay, 

Poor Field will burn e'en in the midst of May. 

139 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

And on June 5, 1619, Sir William Trumbull, ambassador to Hol- 
land, wrote from Brussels to Lord Hay that he was told that the 
Earl of Argyll had paid "for the nourseing of a childe which the 
worlde says is a daughter to my lady and N. Feild the Player" 
(Scott, Athenaum, January xi, 1882., p. 103). Lady Argyll was 
Anne, daughter of Sir William Cornwallis of Brome (^Eliz- Stage, 
ii. 317). Field is alluded to in a letter of May x/\, 1619, from the 
Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering: "The Bishop 
of LLandafF shall be advanced higher . . . and Dr. [Theophilus] 
Field (Field, the player's brother), shall succeed LlandafF" 
(Birch, Court and Times of James I, ii. 167). John Taylor, the 
Water Poet, in Wit and Mirth ((16x9), p. 30, gives a jest about 
him (Works, p. 345): 

A Quiblet 

Master Field the Player riding vp Fleetstreet a great pace, a 
Gentleman called him, and asked him what Play was played that 
day: hee (being angry to be stayd vpon so friuolous a demand) 
answered, that he might see what Play was to be playd vpon 
euery Paste. I cry you mercy (said the Gentleman) I tooke you 
for a Poste. you road so fast. 

Field and Underwood of the Children of the Chapel Royal are 
mentioned by Wright in Historia Histrionica (1699): "Some of 
these chapel-boys, when they grew men, became actors at the 
Blackfriars; such were Nathan Field and John Underwood" 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 416). Although we have no detailed list 
of the characters in which Field won fame, we do know that his 
histrionic ability placed him beside Edward Alleyn and Richard 
Burbage. Richard Flecknoe in A Discourse of the English Stage 
(1664) mentions him with the most eminent artists of his time: 
"In this time were Poets and Actors in their greatest flourish, 
Johnson, Shakespear, with Beaumont and Fletcher their Poets and 
Field and Burbidge their Actors. ... It was the happiness of the 
Actors of those Times to have such Poets as these to instruct them 
and write for them; and no less of those Poets, to have such 

140 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

docile and excellent Actors to Act their Playes, as a Field and 
Burbidge" (Spingarn, Crit. Essays of Seventeenth Cent., ii. 9X, 94 f.). 
As witnessed by the complimentary allusion to him in Bartholo- 
mew Fair (1614), Field was the chief actor of the Lady Elizabeth's 
troupe, corresponding to Burbage of the King's men. Early in his 
career he seems to have undertaken female parts (Variorum, iii. 
XI3), which he later abandoned and attained much celebrity as 
the hero of Chapman's Bussy D'Ambois, originally published in 
1607. In the Prologue to the edition of 1641, he is praised as 
Bussy (Parrott, Trag. of Chapman, p. 3): 

Field is gone. 
Whose action did first give it name. 

The performances by Field referred to in the Prologue were 
presumably by the King's men not earlier than 1616, by which 
date he seems to have joined the company. His portrait is at 
Dulwich, with the description: " ' Master Feild's' picture in his 
shirt; on a board, in a black frame, 'filited' with gold; an actor" 
(Warner, p. 2.07). For further details see Roberta F. Brinkley, 
Nathan Field, the Actor-Playwright, Yale University Press, 19x8. 

FISHER, JOHN. 

A joint-lessee of the new Fortune playhouse, in which he ob- 
tained a half-share on May xo, i6xx (Warner, pp. Z46-47). 

FLETCHER, LAWRENCE. 

Lawrence Fletcher appears to have been the leader of a com- 
pany of players in Scotland during 1595, 1599, and 1601. On 
March xx, 1595, George Nicolson, the English agent at Edin- 
burgh, wrote to Robert Bowes, treasurer of Berwick, that, 
' 'The King heard that Fletcher, the player, was hanged, and told 
him and Roger Aston so, in merry words, not believing it, saying 
very pleasantly that if it were true he would hang them also" 
QS.P. Scottish, ii. 676). On November ix, 1599, Nicolson wrote to 
Sir Robert Cecil concerning "Performances of English players, 

141 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Fletcher, Martin, and their company, by the King's permission; 
enactment of the Town Sessions, and preaching of the ministers 
against them. The bellows blowers say that they are sent by 
England to sow dissension between the King and the Kirk" QS.P. 
Scottish, ii. 777). The players were in high favor with King James, 
and this led to rather critical relations between him and the 
Kirk, which passed an act that "none should resort to these pro- 
fane comedeis" (Calderwood, History, v. 765.) Whereupon the 
Sovereign ordered the Kirk to rescind the act, "and to give a 
special ordinance to the ministers, that, in their sermons on 
Sunday next, they publickly admonish their said flocks, that they 
will not restrain nor censure any of them that shall repair to the 
said comedies and plays" (S.F. Scottish, ii. 778). By 1601 the 
trouble seems to have subsided, as suggested by an entry of 
October xi in the Aberdeen register. The players came in the 
company of "Sir Francis Hospitall of Haulszie, Knycht, Freeh- 
man," and were given the freedom of the city. Among those 
"admittit burgesses" was Lawrence Fletcher, "comediane to his 
Majestie" (Stuart, Extracts, ii. p. xxii). Conjecture has identified 
this Scottish troupe with the Chamberlain's men, on the sup- 
position that the latter company was inhibited in London for 
acting Richard II in 1601 (Fleay, Stage, p. 136), but there is no 
evidence to support the theory. Little is known of Fletcher out- 
side of Scotland. He may be the person referred to in the Ad- 
miral's accounts of October, 1596, where Henslowe records cer- 
tain sums "lent vnto Martyne to feache Fleacher," and "lent the 
company to geue Fleatcher" (H.D. i. 45). His name stands first 
in the patent of May 19, 1603, granted to the King's men, and 
third in the coronation list of March 15, 1604. He does not ap- 
pear to have joined the company acting at the Globe, for he is 
not named in the cast of Sejanus (1603) or in the 1613 folio list 
of performers in Shakespeare's plays. The explanation seems to 
be that since he was a favorite with the King in Scotland, he 
retained his status as a King's servant when James succeeded to 

I4Z 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the English throne. On May 4, 1605, he is described in the will 
of Augustine Phillips as his "fellow," but the meaning of the 
term is somewhat vague and does not necessarily mean that he 
was actively associated with the King's players (_Eliz.. Stage, ii. 
109, iyo). He lived in St. Saviour's, Southwark, where he had a 
homonym, a victualler, who survived him. The token-books re- 
cord a Lawrence Fletcher as living in Hunt's Rents, Maid Lane, 
during 1605, 1606, and 1607. This may have been the actor, 
who w^as buried on September li, 1608. The entry, "Lawrence 
Fletcher, a man: in the church," of the register is expanded in 
the monthly accounts of deaths in the parish to "Lawrence 
Fletcher, a player, the King's servant, buried in the church, with 
an afternoon's knell of the great bell, xoj-." (Collier, Actors, pp. 
x-xi; Rendle, Bankside, p. xxvii). 

FLORIDOR, JOSIAS. 

On May 10, 1635, a warrant was issued for the payment of £30 
to "Mons. Josias Floridor, for himself and the rest of the French 
players for three plays" presented at the Cockpit. Again on Janu- 
ary 8, 1636, there was a payment of £10 to "Josias Floridor for 
himself and the rest of the French players for a tragedy by them 
played before His Majesty Dec. last." The French players, under 
the leadership of Josias de Soulas, generally known by his stage- 
name of Floridor, had come to London in February, 1633. They 
won the favor of the Court, played at the Cockpit in Drury Lane, 
and were later permitted to equip a temporary playhouse in the 
riding-school of one M. Le Febure (or Fevure) in Drury Lane 
(Adams, Playhouses, pp. 401, ^i.cr-7./\; Dram. Rec, pp. 60 fF.). 
Floridor' s career on the French stage is recorded in Hawkins's 
Annals of the French Stage (1884), i. 148 fF. "Every gift required by 
the actor," says Hawkins, "was possessed by Floridor." Henry 
Glapthorne in his comedy entitled The Ladies Privilege (1640) 
^ives a good-natured burlesque on the vivacious characteristics 
of the French players (Plays and Poems, ii. 106): 

143 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Lactantio. But Adorni, 

What thinke you of the French? 

Adorni. Very ayry people, who participate 
More fire than earth; yet generally good, 
And nobly disposition'd, something inclining 

[Enter Corimba. 
To over-weening fancy — This Lady 
Tells my remembrance of a Comick scene, 
I once saw in their Theatre. 

Bonivet. Adde it to 
Your former courtesies, and expresse it. 

And the stage-direction notes that "Adorni Acts furiously." 

FLOWER. 

A writer signing himself "Dramaticus," in Shakespeare Society's 
Papers, iv. no, describes a copy of Dekker's Shoemaker s Holiday 
with alleged manuscript notes giving the cast of the play as pro- 
duced by the Admiral's men about 1600. To Flower is assigned 
the part of Warner, a citizen. Greg discredits the list as "an ob- 
vious forgery" (H.D. ii. xo}). 

FOSTER, ALEXANDER. 

Alexander Foster belonged to the Lady Elizabeth's troupe on 
August X9, 1 61 1, when he and his fellow-actors gave Philip 
Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" of agree- 
ment (H.P., pp. 18, III). On April i, i6ii, he received payment 
on behalf of the Lady Elizabeth's men for plays presented at 
Court during the Christmas season of i6ii-ii. In 161 5-1 6 there 
seems to have been some kind of amalgamation of Prince Charles's 
company and the Lady Elizabeth's men, and Foster appears as 
payee for the Court performances by the Prince's men at Christ- 
mas, 1615-16 (Steele, pp. 171, 174, 195). He was again a member 
of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe on March xo, 1618, when a license 
was granted to him, John Townsend, Joseph Moore, and Francis 
Wambus; and with this company he seems to have remained 
until 16x9. He is named in a license of March ro, i6xi; in a bill 

144 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

of March 13, 161.2., signed by the Lord Chamberlain; in a warrant 
of June 30, 1 6x8, appointing as Grooms of the Chamber several 
of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) players; and in a 
license of December 9, 162.8. He also appears in provincial records 
of the visits of the company: at Norwich, May zt,, 1618, April 
IX, i6io, May 10, 16x3; and at Reading, December 14, 16x9 (Mur- 
ray, i. X5X, 2.55, X59; ii. 344, 345, 346-47, 386; Stopes, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 94). 

FOUCH, RICHARD. 

In December, 1631 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45), Richard Fouch 
played Margery, maid to Millescent, in Marmion's Holland's 
Leaguer, presented by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his 
servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, 
Works, pp. ±, 6). 

FOWLER, RICHARD. 

Richard Fowler is mentioned in the lease of the Fortune by 
Edward Alleyn to the Palsgrave's men on October 31, 161 8 QH. 
P., p. xy), and in the 162.2. Herbert list of the Palsgrave's com- 
pany (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). In 16x3 he was living "in 
Redcrosse Streete" (W^lla.ce, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 348.) On April 30, 
16x4, he and others of the Palsgrave's men entered into a bond to 
Richard Gunnell, manager of the company (Hotson, pp. 5X-53). 
He may have remained with the Palsgrave's company until De- 
cember, 1 63 1, when the troupe seems to have passed under the 
patronage of the young Prince Charles, for during the same month 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45) he played Snarl in Marmion's Holland's 
Leaguer, presented by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his 
servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, 
Works, pp. X, 6). He is named in a warrant of May 10, 163X, ap- 
pointing as Grooms of the Chamber several of Prince Charles's men 
(Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). Edmund Gay ton makes an allusion to 
him in his Pleasant Notes upon Don Quixot (1654), p. X71 : "It was 
not then the most mimicall nor fighting man, Fowler, nor Andrew 

145 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Cane could pacifie; Prologues nor Epilogues would prevaile; the 
Devill and the fool were quite out of favour." The register of St. 
Giles, Cripplegate, records the burial of Thomas, son of Richard 
Fowler, in 16x4, and the burial of a Richard Fowler in Septem- 
ber, 1643 (Malcolm, Lond. Rediv., iii. 304). 

FREYERBOTT, BARTHOLOMEUS. 

Bartholomeus Freyerbott was in the service of the Elector of 
Brandenburg in 161 5, when he and Johann Friedrich Virnius 
visited Danzig as the Brandenburg comedians (Bolte, p. 41). 

FRITH, MARY. 

Chambers QElix.- Stage, iii. 2.96-97) suggests that the lines in 
the Epilogue to Middleton and Dekker's comedy of The Roaring 
Girl (Dekker, Works, iii. 2.34), 

The Roring Girle her selfe some few dayes hence, 
Shall on this Stage, giue larger recompence, 

"refer to a contemplated personal appearance of Mary Frith," 
the heroine of the play, on the Fortune stage about 1610. The 
play was printed in 1611 "As it hath lately beene Acted on the 
Fortune-stage by the Prince his Players." 

FROST, JOHN. 

As a member of the Children of the Chapel Royal, John Frost 
appears in the cast of Jonson's Cynthia's Revels, acted in 1600 
QEliz.. Stage, iii. 363). 

GARLAND, JOHN. 

John Garland became associated with Queen Elizabeth's men 
Avhen the troupe was first established in 1583, and is named in a 
London record that gives the personnel of the company at this 
time (Elix^. Stage, ii. 106). He no doubt remained with the Queen's 
men, for he is mentioned in a document of June 30, 1588, concern- 
ing the non-payment of subsidy by certain members of the com- 
pany (M.S.C., i. 354). By March, 1605, he belonged to the com- 

146 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

pany under the patronage of the Duke of Lennox, who may have 
taken over some members of the Queen's troupe at her death in 
1603. On March i, 1605, Abraham Saverey gave Francis Hen- 
slowe a Power of Attorney to recover £40 from John Garland of 
"the ould forde," forfeited on a bond "for the deliuere of a war- 
rant, which was mayd vnto me frome the gratious the duke of 
Linox"; and on March 16, 1605, Francis Henslowe gave his 
uncle Philip a bond of £60 to observe articles of an agreement 
that he had made with Garland and Saverey "his ffellowes, 
servantes to the most noble Prince the duke of Lennox" (H.F., 
pp. 6i ff.)- There was also an undated loan, probably of 1604, 
of £7 by Philip Henslowe to his nephew Francis "to goyne with 
owld Garlland and Symcockes and Saverey when they played 
in the duckes nam at their laste goinge owt" (H.D., i. 160). 
Garland is named in a patent granted on March 30, 1610, to the 
company under the patronage of Prince Charles, then Duke of 
York, and known as the Duke of York's men. After Prince 
Henry's death in November, 1612., they became entitled to the 
designation of Prince Charles's players; and this troupe is perhaps 
a continuation of the company formerly patronized by the Duke 
of Lennox QEli^. Stage, ii. X43). On May 18, 1615, the Prince's 
men visited Norwich, where they were allowed to play eight 
days; the records give the names of Garland, William Rowley, 
and Thomas Hobbes (Murray, ii. 340). By March zo, 1616, he 
had doubtless retired from the stage, for his name does not ap- 
pear in the agreement between the Prince's company and Alleyn 
and Meade, although both Rowley and Hobbes are mentioned. 
As noted in the transaction of March i, 1605, with Saverey and 
Henslowe, Garland apparently lived at "the ould forde," which 
was on the River Lea, near Hackney Marsh (H.F., p. 6i«.). 

GARLICK. 

A comic player named Garlick seems to have appeared in jigs 
on the Fortune stage, as recorded by L H. in This World's Folly 

147 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(1615): "I will not particularize those . . . Fortune-fnued fooles, 
. . . who are faine to produce blinde Impudence ["Garlicke" 
printed in margin], to personate himselfe vpon their stage, be- 
hung with chaynes of Garlicke, as an Antidote against their 
owne infectious breaths, lest it should kill their Oyster-crying 
Audience" QEli^. Stage, iv. 2.54). Other apparent allusions to 
him are made by Dekker, // If be not Good, the Devil is in It, 1610- 
IX (Works, iii. 3x5): 

Scumbroth. No, no, if Fortune fauourd me, I should be full, but 
Fortune fauours no body but Garlicke, nor Garlicke neither now, 
yet she has strong reason to loue it; for tho Garlicke made her 
smell abhominably in the nostrils of the gallants, yet she had 
smelt and stuncke worse but for garlicke; 

by Henry Parrott, haquei Ridiculosi, 1613 (Collier, Bibl. Ace, iv. 
x8x): "Greene's Tu Quoque and those Garlick Jigs"; by Robert 
Tailor, The Hog Hath Lost His Pearl, 1614 (Hazlitt's Dodsley, 
xi. 434): 

Haddit. A small matter! you'll find it worth Meg of West- 
minster, although it be but a bare jig. 

Player. O Lord, sir, I would it had but half the taste of garlic. 

Haddit. Garlic stinks to this; if it prove that you have not 
more whores than e'er garlic had; 

and by John Taylor, the Water Poet, A Cast over the Water, about 
1615 (Works, 1630, p. 3x1): 

And for his action he eclipseth quite 

The ligge of Garlick, or the Punks delight. 

GARRETT, JOHN. 

John Garrett appears among the representatives of Queen 
Anne's London and provincial companies of players who at- 
tended her funeral on May 13, 1619 (Murray, i. 196-97). Per- 
haps he is to be identified with the John Garrett, player-fool and 
jester, celebrated by John Taylor, the Water Poet, in Wit and 
Mirth (16x9), described on the title-page as "Apothegmatically 

148 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

bundled vp and garbled at the request of old John Garrett's 
Ghost," and having an introduction of 102. verses entitled "John 
Garrets Ghost," in which the ghost of the jester speaks to the 
poet. That Garrett was a favorite at the Elizabethan, Jacobean, 
and Caroline Courts is evidenced by the introductory verses : 

And to the Court I often made resort 
When Englands mighty Queene Elizabeth 
Allow'd me entertainment for disport; 
Then by the foretop did I take old time : 
Then were not halfe so many fooles as now; 
Then was my haruest, and my onely prime, 
My purse receiuing what my wit did plow. 
Then in such compasse I my jests would hold. 
That though I gaue a man a gird or twaine. 
All his reuenge would be to giue me gold. 
With commendations of my nimble braine. 
Thus liu'd I, till that gracious Queene deceast, 
Who was succeeded by a famous King, 
In whose blest Sons reigne (I with yeeres opprest) 
Me to my graue sicknesse and death did bring. 

And in the dedicatory epistle addressed to "Master Archibold 
Rankin," Taylor alludes to Garrett as "that old honest mirrour 
of mirth, deceased," and informs the dedicatee that he might 
have inscribed the "bundle of mirth" to that "peerelesse Prin- 
cesse ... to whose seruice, and for whose happiness, his [Gar- 
rett's] life and best endeauours, with his prayers and implora- 
tions at his death, were vnfainedly consecrated" (Hazlitt, Jesf- 
Books, iii). There is an allusion to him in Verses uppon C[hrist] 
C[hurch] play, made by Mr. Holliday, acted before the King at Wood- 
stocke, 1638 (Halliwell-Phillipps, Marriage of Wit and Wisdom, 
p. 86): 

Why, all the guard, that never knew a letter 
But that uppon ther coates, whose witt consists 
In Archyes bobs and Garretts sawcy jeasts. 

In Wits Recreations (1640) is printed the following epitaph (ii. 
2-39): 

149 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

On John Garret 

Gone is John Garret, who to all men's thinking, 
For love to Claret kill'd himselfe with drinking. 

GARY, GILES. 
See Giles Garey. 

GASCOIGNE, WILLIAM. 

On February 19, 1589, William Gascoigne served as joint- 
payee with William Spencer for a performance at Court by the 
Admiral's men (Steele, p. 98). Possibly he is to be identified with 
the William Gascoyne Qq.v.') employed by the King's men in 16x4. 

GASCOINE. 

See Willaim Gascoyne. 

GASCOYNE, WILLIAM. 

William Gascoyne is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December xy, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed 
by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). He may fairly be identified with the Gascoine men- 
tioned in the marginal notes with one Hubert as a minor actor 
or stage-attendant to open the trap-door for Antiochus played 
by Joseph Taylor in Massinger's Believe as You List (ed. Croker, 
p. 66), licensed for the King's men on May 7, 1631 (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 33). See William Gascoigne. 

GERDLER, ADAM. 

The accounts of the Clifford family record a payment of 5J-. 
in 1635 "To Adam Gerdler, whom my Lord sent for from York 
to act a part in The Knight of the Burning Pestell," which was 
played at Skipton Castle, the seat of Lord Clifford (Whitaker, 
Hist, of Craven, p. 394). 

150 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

GERRY. 

Presumably Gerry was a member of the Children of the King's 
Revels in 1607. The register of St. Dunstan's, Whitefriars, re- 
cords his burial on September x^, 1607. "Gerry out of the play- 
house in the Friars buried" (Jonas, Shak. and the Stage, p. i3x). 

GEW. 

Gew (or Gue), although often referred to as "an actor who 
had gone blind," seems more likely to have been "a blind per- 
forming baboon" (see W. Strunk, jr., "The Elizabethan Show- 
man's Ape," Mod. Lang. Notes, 1917, xxxii. zio-ii). Numerous 
allusions to him in Elizabethan literature give evidence of his 
popularity with the amusement-loving public. Guilpin, Skia- 
letheia (1598), Epigram xi and Satire v (Works, ed. Grosart, pp. 

7. 57): 

To Gue 

Gue, hang thy selfe for woe, since gentlemen 
Are now growne cunning in thy apishnes: 
Nay, for they labour with their foolishnes 
Thee to vndoe, procure to hang them then: 
It is a strange seeld scene vncharitie 
To make fooles of themselues to hinder thee. 

But who's in yonder coach? my lord and foole, 
One that for ape-tricks can put Gue to schoole. 

Marston, i Antonio and Mellida (acted 1599; printed 1602.), In- 
duction (Works, i. 13): 

'T had been a right part for Proteus or Gew. 
Ho! blind Gew would ha' done 't rarely, rarely. 

Meeting of Gallants (1604; ed. Halliwell-Phillipps, p. 14): 

For blinde Gue you know has six-pence at the 
least for groping in the Darke. 

Jonson, Epigrams (1616), cxxix. To Mime (Works, viii. xx8): 

Yet take thy due. 
Thou dost out-zany Cokely, Pod; nay Gue. 

151 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Cokely and Pod were managers of puppet-shows and exhibitors 
at Bartholomew Fair. 

GIBBES, GEORGE. 

George Gibbes's name appears in a warrant of June 30, 161.S, 
appointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94). 

GIBBORNE, THOMAS. 

A joint-lessee of the Fortune playhouse, in which he obtained 
a whole share on April 2.1, 16x4 (Warner, p. x^f). 

GIBBS. 

Gibbs appeared as a Gete in the Procession of / Tamar Cam, 
acted by the Admiral's men in 1602. (H.P., p. 154). 

GIBES, ANTONY. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
162.8, Antony Gibes is recorded at Norwich on July 2. of the same 
year (Murray, ii. 103). 

GIBSON, H. 

Gibson is named in several marginal notes to the prompt- 
books in the British Museum Egerton MS. 1994. In The Captives 
he appears as a factor; in The Two Noble Ladies, as a soldier; and in 
Edmond Ironside, as a messenger. His Christian name seems to 
have begun with "H" (Boas, Library, 1917, viii. Z3i-33). On 
September 3, 16x4, The Captives was licensed for the Cockpit 
company (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 2.^'), i.e. the Lady Elizabeth's 
men. The Two Noble Ladies was "Often tymes acted with appro- 
bation at the Red Bull in St. John's Streete by the company of 
the Revells" (Bullen, Old Plays, ii. 430), and is assigned by Fleay 
to 1619-2.1 (Dram., ii. 334). 

GIBSON, RICHARD. 

From 1494 to about 1508 Richard Gibson belonged to Henry 
VII's Court Interluders under the leadership of John English. 

151 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Early in the reign of Henry VIII he was appointed Yeoman of 
the Revels, which position he held for many years and performed 
its duties with distinction (Collier, i. 44, 68, 70, 106, 109; Eliz- 
Stage, i. yz; ii. 78, 80). 

GIDEON. 

Gideon appeared as a Gete in the Procession of / Tamar Cam, 
presented by the Admiral's men in i6ox QH.P., p. 154). 

GILBOURNE, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Gibborne. 

GILBURNE, SAMUEL. 

Samuel Gilburne is named in the 16x3 folio list of actors in 
Shakespeare's plays, but is not otherwise known except in the 
will of Augustine Phillips, May 4, 1605: "I geve to Samuell 
Gilborne, my late apprentice, the some of fortye shillings, and 
my mouse colloured velvit hose, and a white taffety dublet, a 
blacke taffety sute, my purple cloke, sword, and dagger, and my 
base viall" (Collier, Actors, p. 87). He may have played, as Col- 
lier infers, "upon the instrument thus left to him by his master 
and instructor in the business of the stage." He has been con- 
jectured to be the "b[oy?] Sam" of the plot of The Dead Mans 
Fortune (H.P., pp. 133, i5x), a play possibly acted by the Ad- 
miral's men at the Theatre about 1590 QEli^. Stage, ii. 136). 

GILES, NATHANIEL. 

Master of the Children of Windsor, 1 595-1634; and Master of 
the Children of the Chapel Royal, 1597-1634 (Rimbault, Old 
Cheque Book, pp. 198-99; Adams, Playhouses, pp. 101-13.) 

GILES, THOMAS. 

Master of the Children of Paul's, from 1585 to about 1590; 
and presumably Instructor in Music to Prince Henry, 1606, and 
Prince Charles, 1613 (Fli'^^. Stage, ii. 17 fF., i9«.). 

153 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

GILES'S BOY. 

Giles's boy appeared as a Pigmy in the Procession of i Tamar 
Cam, played by the Admiral's men in i6oi (H.P., p. 154). 

GOAD, CHRISTOPHER. 

As a member of Queen Henrietta's company at the Cockpit in 
Drury Lane, Christopher Goad played Oxford in Davenport's 
King John and Matilda (c. 16x9), and Forset and a Spanish cap- 
tain in the first part of Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, and the 
Duke of Ferrara in the second part, acted about Christmas, 1630. 
There seems to be no further record of him until the Norwich list 
of March 10, 1635, when he was a member of, presumably, the 
King's Revels company; with this troupe he acted Silius, the 
chief favorite to the Empress, in Richards 's Messallina, the Roman 
Empress, printed in 1640 (Murray, i. pp. x66, Z79-8i). The regis- 
ters of St. James, Clerkenwell, record the children of a Christo- 
pher Goad, and in one entry give his wife's name as Ruth (Hov- 
enden, i. iiz, 118, ixi; iv. xo4, xoy, i5i): Constance (baptized 
July X3, 162.9), Christopher (baptized October 19, 1631; buried 
January 2., i63x), John (baptized November xS, i63x; buried 
January 18, 1633), and Mary (buried January 16, 164X). He 
may be the C. G. who contributed commendatory verses to 
Thomas Rawlins's The Rebellion (1640; Hazlitt's Dodsley, xvi. 6), 
and to Thomas Nabbes's The Unfortunate Mother (1640; Bullen, 
Old Plays, N. S., ii. 88). "Among the Lacrymae Cantabrigienses for 
Queen Anne, 161 9, is a brief Latin lament signed Christ. Goade 
Bac. Art. of Coll. Royal Soc." (Heywood, ed. Bates, p. X54). 

GODWIN, RICHARD. 

In December, 1631 (Adams, Dram. R^c, p. 45), Richard Godwin 
played Faustina, sister to Philautus, in Marmion's Holland's 
Leaguer, presented by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his 
servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, 
Works, pp. z, 6). 

154 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

GOFFE, ALEXANDER. 
See Alexander Goughe. 

GOFFE, ROBERT. 

See Robert Goughe. 

GOLDING. 

One Golding, supposedly a player, is alluded to by Thomas 
Rawlins in his tragedy of The Rebellion (1640): "Why forty- 
pound Golding of the beggars' theatre speaks better, yet has a 
mark for the sage audience to exercise their dexterity, in throw- 
ing of rotton apples, whilst my stout actor pockets, and then 
eats up, the injury" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xiv. 81). 

GOODALE, BAPTISTE. 

A Baptiste Goodale is included in a forged list of ' 'her Maiesties 
poore Playeres . . . sharers in the blacke Fryers playhouse" in 
November, 1589, printed by Collier (New Facts, p. 11). The 
certificate has been discredited as "a recent fabrication," and is 
not known to rest on any genuine information (Ingleby, Complete 
View, p. 2.49). 

GOODALE, THOMAS. 

On July II, 1 5 81, Arthur King and Thomas Goodale, members 
of a troupe of players under the patronage of Lord Berkeley, 
were committed to the Counter for having taken part in an 
affray with certain gentlemen of Gray's Inn (Harrison, England, 
iv. 32.0). In the plot of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, played by Stange's 
company about 1590, Goodale is cast for the parts of Lucias in 
"Envy," Phronesias and a messenger in "Sloth," and a lord in 
"Lechery" (Greg, H. P., p. i'^-l; R. E. S., i. 2.6-l). His name 
appears in a marginal notation as a messenger in Sir Thomas 
More, III. iii. i, thought to have been written between 1594 and 
i6ox (Shak. Apoc, pp. 4ox, 437; EU^. Stage, iv. 33); Tannenbaum, 
however, contends that this marginal note is a forgery by Collier. 

155 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate record the baptism and 
burial of two sons of the player (Denkinger, P. M. L. A., xli. 
loo): Symon (May ii, 1594; April 30, 1595), and Richard (August 
19, 1599; November x}, 1599)- He has been doubtfully identified 
with the Thomas Goodale, mercer, who, together with John 
Alleyn and Robert Lee, entered into a bond to Edward Alleyn on 
May 18, 1593 (Warner, p. 1x7). 

GOSSON, STEPHEN. 

Lodge, in his Defence of Plays of about 1579 (Works, i. 8), refers 
to Stephen Gosson as "a player." Gosson had left the stage by 
i579> when he published The School of Abuse, "conteining a plesaunt 
inuective against Poets, Pipers, Plaiers, lesters, and such like 
Caterpillers of a Commonwealth." 

COST, ELI AS. 
See Ellis Guest. 

GOUGHE, ALEXANDER. 

Alexander Goughe (or GofFe), son of Robert Goughe Cq.v.^, 
a player, was baptized at St. Saviour's, Southwark, on August 7, 
1 614 (Collier, iii. 474)- At an early age he became associated 
with the King's men at Blackfriars, and apparently won some 
distinction as an actor of female parts. With the King's company 
he played (Murray, i. opp. i7x) Caenis, Vespasian's concubine, 
in Massinger's Roman Actor, licensed October 11, i6i6, at which 
date he was twelve years old; an unassigned part in Ford's 
Lover s Melancholy, licensed November 14, i6r8; Acanthe, a maid 
of honor, in Massinger's Picture, licensed June 8, 16x9; and 
Lillia-Bianca in The Wildgoose Chase, a revival, 163 1. He is also 
named in the "Players Pass" issued to the King's men on May 
17, 1636. After the closing of the playhouses in iG^i. he helped 
to organize surreptitious performances at noblemen's houses, 
particularly Holland House at Kensington. Wright in Historia 
Histrionica (1699) says that "Alexander GofFe, the woman-actor 

156 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

at Blackfriars (who had made himself known to persons of 
quality), used to be the jackal, and give notice of time and 
place" of the privately-acted plays (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 410). 
During the Commonwealth he became a publisher, and is known 
to have issued three plays: the Jonson-Fletcher-Middleton 
comedy of The Widow (1651), with an address to the reader 
(Bullen, M-iddleton, v. ixi); The Queen, or the Excellency of her Sex 
(1653), ascribed to Ford, with a dedication to the Lady Catherine 
Mohun; and Carlell's Passionate Lovers (1655), dedicated "To 
the Illustrious Princess, Mary Dutchess of Richmond and Lennox' ' 
(The Queen, ed. Bang, p. vii, note'). 

GOUGHE, ROBERT. 

Robert Goughe (or GofFe) is probably the "R. Go" cast for 
Aspasia in "Sloth" in the plot of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented 
by Strange's company about 1590 (Greg, H. P., p. i'^'l; R. E. S., 
i. i6i). Nothing is known of him between 1592. and 1603. He 
may have joined the King's men soon after the royal patent was 
granted on May 19, 1603, for he is next found with them. He is 
a joint-legatee with John Edmans (or Edmonds) in the will, 
dated July ii, 1603, of Thomas Pope, who left them his wearing 
apparel and arms. He witnessed the will of Augustine Phillips 
on May 4, 1605. Phillips names as legatee a sister, Elizabeth 
Goughe, who is no doubt the Elizabeth recorded in the register 
of St. Saviour's, Southwark, as marrying Robert Goughe on 
February 13, 1603. His name is found in the 16x3 folio list of 
Shakespearean players; in the King's men's patent of March xy, 
1619; and in the livery-allowance lists of May 19, 1619, and 
April 7, i6xi (M. S. C, i. i8o; Murray, i. opp. lyx). A stage- 
direction (line 172.3) of The Second Maiden's Tragedy (161 1) 
shows that he played Memphonius: "Enter Mr. Goughe" (ed. 
Greg, p. 54). In 1619 he acted Leidenberch in Sir John van Olden 
Barnavelt (ed. Frijlinck, p. clx). The token-books of St. Saviour's 
give his residence in Hill's Rents during 1604, Samson's Rents in 

157 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

1605 and 1606, and Austin's Rents in i6ix-ix; and the registers 
record his children: Anne (baptized December 11, 1603), Eliza- 
beth (baptized May 30, 1605), Nicholas (baptized November X4, 
1608), Dorothy (baptized February 10, 1611; buried January ix, 
1 613), and Alexander (baptized August 7, 1614), the last of whom 
became a member of the King's company. His burial is recorded 
in the same parish on February 19, 1615 (Collier, iii. 471-74; 
Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856; Rendle, Bankside, p. xxvii). 
A Robert Goughe (or Goffe) is also noted as living "on the 
Banckesyde" in 16x3 (Wallace, Jabrbuch, xlvi. 347), and as "one 
of the Messengers of his Majesties Chamber" on August 30, 162.4 
(M. S. C, i. 381). 

GOUGHE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Goughe and John Greaves are named as payees for a 
performance at Court by Sir Robert Lane's men on February 17, 
1571 (Steele, p. 41). 

GRACE, FRANCIS. 

Francis Grace is named as one of Prince Henry's players in 
the household list of 1610 QEliz- Stage, ii. 188). The Prince died 
in November, 161 2., and his troupe soon passed under the patron- 
age of the Palsgrave. Grace is mentioned in the new^ patent 
granted to the Palsgrave's company on January 11, 1613 (M. S. C, 
i. 2.75); in the lease of the Fortune by the Palsgrave's men on 
October 31, 161 8 QH. P., p. 17); and in the 162.x Herbert list of 
the troupe (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). In 16x3 he lived "att the 
George Alley in Gouldings lane" (Wallace, Jabrbuch, xlvi. 347). 

GRACE, RICHARD. 

In 16x3 Richard Grace was an actor at the Fortune, and lived 
"in Goulding Lane." With Richard Claytone, William Strat- 
ford, and Abraham Pedle, "all Actors at the fortune neere Gold- 
ing lane," he was summoned to appear at court to answer a 
bill of complaint made by Gervase Markham (Wallace, Jabrbuch, 

158 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

xlvi. 348, 350). In 1613 the Fortune was occupied by the Pals- 
grave's men, and Grace doubtless belonged to this company. 
The register of St. Giles, Cripplegate, records the burial of a 
Richard Grace in 16x7 (Malcolm, Lond. Rediv., iii. 304). 

GRADWELL, HENRY. 

In December, 163 1 (Adams, Dra?n. Rec, p. 45), Henry Gradwell 
played Capritio, a young novice, in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, 
presented by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his servants, 
at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. 
z, 6). His name also appears in a warrant of May 10, 1631, 
appointing as Grooms of the Chamber several of Prince Charles's 
men (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). The marginal notes to the 
Egerton MS. of Edmond Ironside assign to him the parts of a 
nobleman's son and a herald in that play (Boa's, Library, 1917, 
viii. Z33, Z35). 

GRAUNGER, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 1509 and 15 11 (Brewer, 
L. (iT* P. Hejiry VIII, i. i. p. 15; Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. 
Z44; Chambers, Eli^- Stage, ii. iqn?). 

GRAY, MARGARET. 

A joint-lessee of the Fortune playhouse, in which she obtained 
a half-share on August i, 16x3, and a whole share on January 19, 
1614 (Warner, p. 147) . 

GREAVES, JOHN. 

John Greaves and Thomas Goughe are named as payees for a 
performance at Court by Sir Robert Lane's men on February 17, 
I57Z (Steele, p. 41). 

GREEN, JOHN. 

John Green is heard of only on the Continent, where he w^as 
for a time associated with Robert Browne in the troupe known 
as the Hessian Comedians, under the patronage of Maurice of 

159 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Hesse. He was at Strassburg in June, 1606; at Frankfort in August, 
1606, and March, 1607; and at Elbing and Danzig during 1607. 
He then seems to have entered the service of Archduke Ferdinand, 
for an English troupe attended the Archduke at Graz in Novem- 
ber, 1607, later at Passau, and again at Graz in February, 1608. 
This company has been plausibly identified upon the follow^ing 
evidence with the one under the leadership of Green. The repertory 
of the company included Nobody and Somebody, of which play 
there is extant at Rein a German manuscript with a dedication 
by Green to Ferdinand's brother the Archduke Maximilian, who 
was no doubt present at the Graz performances. The visit to 
Graz was apparently terminated by a duel in which a French- 
man was killed by one of the English actors, "the man with 
long red hair, who always played a little fiddle," who may have 
been Green himself, for a portrait of a red-haired actor, in the 
traditional costume of Nobody, accompanies the manuscript in 
the Rein library. Before 1608 Green may have acted in France, 
for in the dedication of Nobody and Somebody he says that he had 
been in that country (Elix.. Stage, ii. zSz, 2.94). Green, like 
Robert Browne, now disappears for some years from German 
annals. A record at Utrecht in November, 1613, suggests 
that he probably spent some time in the Netherlands. Subsequently 
he returned to Germany. In July, 1615 and 1616, he visited 
Danzig. On this last visit Robert Reynolds, late of Queen Anne's 
company, was with him. In 1617 he appears at Prague on the 
occasion of the coronation of the Archduke Ferdinand as King 
of Bohemia, and in July of the same year at Vienna (Meissner, 
Jahrbuch, xix. 139). Although his name is not found in the 
records for about two years, he may now have joined his old 
leader, Robert Browne, for Reynolds, who had accompanied 
Green to Danzig in 1616, was with Browne at Strassburg in 1618. 
In April, i6xo. Green came to Cologne and Utrecht. Following 
the outbreak of the Thirty Years' War, he probably, about 1G2.0, 
withdrew from Germany. But in 16x6-17 he again appears in 

160 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

that country. During 162.6 he was at Frankfort and Dresden, and 
during 162.7, at Torgau, Dresden, Nuremberg, and Frankfort. 
Reynolds, who won some notoriety as a clown under the name 
of Pickleherring, accompanied him on this last tour and ap- 
parently succeeded him as leader of the troupe. We hear no more 
of Green (Herz, pp. 19 ff., X4 fF.). He may have been a brother 
of Thomas Greene (^. ^.). 

GREENE, ROBERT. 

Harvey, in his Four Letters of 1592. (Works, i. 190), seems to 
speak of Greene as "a Player." Nothing is known of his stage- 
career. Chambers (Elix,. Stage, iii. 317) is of the opinion "that 
the theory that Greene himself was actor as well as playwright 
rests on a misinterpretation of a phrase of Harvey's, and is in- 
consistent with the invariable tone of his references to the 
profession." 

GREENE, THOMAS. 

Early in the reign of James I the Earl of Worcester's men were 
taken into the patronage of Queen Anne, and Thomas Greene 
was a member of Queen Anne's company at its formation late 
in 1603 or early in 1604, since his name appears in the undated 
draft license; he continued with this company till his death in 
i6ii. He took part in the coronation procession of March 15, 
1604, wearing a cloak of red cloth; and his name occurs in both 
the license of April 15, 1609, and the duplicate patent issued to 
the traveling company on January 7, i6ii (M. S. C, i. 1.6'^, "l-jo; 
Eli-^. Stage, ii. r.'i.<^\ Murray, ii. 343). From 1609 to i6ii he was 
payee for the Court performances of the troupe (Steele, pp. 159, 
i6i, 164, 169, 171). In his will (Fleay, Stage, p. i9x), dated 
July X5, i6ix, he mentions his wife Susan, formerly wife of one 
Browne, his daughter Honor, his sons-in-law (i.e. stepsons) 
Robert and William Browne, his daughters-in-law Susanna, 
Elizabeth, and Anne Browne, his brothers John and JefFery 
Greene, his sister Elizabeth Barrett, and John Cumber, who be- 

161 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

longed to Queen Anne's company by 1616. He leaves 40s. to "my 
fellowes of the house of the redd Bull ... to buy gloves for them," 
and names Christopher Beeston and Richard Perkins as overseers. 
Beeston, Perkins, and Thomas Heywood were among the wit- 
nesses of the will, which was probated by his widow on October 
ID, i6ix. The register of St. James, Clerkenwell, records on August 
7, i6ix, the burial of "Thomas Greene, householder, in the 
Chancell" (Hovenden, iv. ixo), and his will describes him as of 
this parish. The disposal of Greene's property led several years 
later to a lawsuit between Queen Anne's company and Susan 
Baskervile, Greene's widow. (The Baskervile documents are 
printed in Fleay, Stage, pp. T-jo-^j.^ Thus his death not only 
deprived the Red Bull of its chief attraction but involved his 
fellows in a hampering net of financial difficulties that prepared 
the way for the final dissolution of the Queen's troupe upon her 
death in 1619. Greene was one of the chief actors of Shakespeare's 
time, and was to Queen Anne's company what Burbage was to 
the King's men. His excellence as a clown made him known to all 
Londoners as the best comedian since Tarlton and Kempe. For 
a possible allusion to him as "the lean fool" see under John 
Shank, p. 319. He is now chiefly remembered for the amusing 
comedy named after him — Cooke's City Gallant (c. 161 1), a play 
to which Greene's comic success in the part of Bubble had given 
the new and lasting title, Greene's Tu Quoque, in which Greene is 
spoken of by name (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xi. 2.40): 

Scatter good. Yes, faith, brother, if it please you: let's go to see 
a play at the Globe. 

Bubble. I care not; any whither, so the clown have a part; for, 
i' faith, I am nobody without a fool. 

Geraldine. Why then we'll go to the Red Bull: they say Green's 
a good clown. 

Bubble. Green! Green's an ass. 

Scatter good. Wherefore do you say so? 

Bubble. Indeed, I ha' no reason; for they say he is as like me as 
ever he can look. 

i6z 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

The play was published in 1614 with an epistle to the reader 
by Thomas Heywood, who writes : 

As for Master Green, all that I will speak of him (and that 
without flattery) is this (if I were worthy to censure), there was 
not an actor of his nature, in his time, of better ability in per- 
formance of what he undertook, more applauded by the audience, 
of greater grace at the court, or of more general love in the city : 
and so with this brief character of his memory I commit him 
to his rest. 

A couplet signed "W. R." (probably William Rowley), was 
also prefixed to the play (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xi. 179): 

Upon the Death of Thomas Greene 

How fast bleak Autumn changeth Flora's dye! 
What yesterday was Green, now's sear and dry. 

W. R. 

In Richard Braithwaite's Remains after Death (1618) are printed 
four epigrams on him (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xi. 177): 

Upon an actor now of late deceased: and upon his action Tu Quoque: 
and first upon his travel 

Hee whom this mouldered clod of earth doth hide. 
New come from sea, made but one face and dide. 

Upon his creditors 

His debtors now no fault with him can finde, 
Sith he has paid to nature all's behinde. 

Upon his fellow actors 

What can you crave of your poore fellow more? 
He does but what Tu quoque did before: 
Then give him dying, actions second wreath, 
That second'd him in action and in death. 

163 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

In actorem M.imicum cut vix -parem cernimus suferstitem Quaecunque orta 

sunt occidtint. Sallust. 

Ver vireat quod te peperit (viridissima proles) 
Quaeque tegit cineres, ipsa virescat humus. 
Transis ab exiguis nunquam periture theatris 
Ut repetas sacri pulchra theatra Jovis. 

The line in the first epigram, "New come from sea, made but one 
face and dide," seems to imply that Greene had died suddenly 
on his return from a voyage, which leads to the conjecture that 
he may have been on the Continent with John Green (^q.v.'), who 
has been suggested as his brother. I. H., in This World's Folly 
(1615), mentions his performance of a baboon (Fliz,. Stage, iv. 
X54): "Vos qtioque [in margin, "Or Tu quoque'^, and you also, who 
with i'cjy //^-barking, 5'/^«/or-throated bellowings, flash choaking 
squibbes of absurd vanities into the nosthrils of your spectators, 
barbarously diuerting Nature, and defacing Gods owne image, by 
metamorphising humane [in margin, "Greenes Baboone"] shape 
into bestiall forme." Greene is generally taken to be the author 
of A Poets Vision and a Princes Glorie, "Dedicated to the high and 
mightie Prince James, King of England, Scotland, France, and 
Ireland," and printed in 1603 as "Written by Thomas Greene, 
Gentleman" (Hazlitt, Hand-Book, 1867, p. X43); and of some 
commendatory verses prefixed to the 1605 edition of Drayton's 
Barons' Wars (Works, i. 87): 

To Mr. Michael Drayton 

What ornament might I devise, to fit 

Th* aspiring height of thy admired spirit? 

Or what fair garland worthy is to sit 

On thy blest brows, that compass in all merit? 

Thou shalt not crowned be with common bays. 

Because for thee it is a crown too low; 

Apollo's tree can yield thee simple praise, 

It is too dull a vesture for thy brow: 

But with a wreath of stars shalt thou be crown'd, 

164 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Which when thy working temples do sustain, 
Will, like the spheres, be ever moving round 
After the royal musick of thy brain. 
Thy skill doth equal Phoebus, not thy birth; 
He to Heaven gives musick. Thou to Earth. 

Thomas Greene. 

GREGORY, JACK. 

Jack Gregory appeared as Tarmia's child and as Heron in 
I Tamar Cam, and as an Amazon in the Procession of the same 
play, presented by the Admiral's men in 1602. (H.P., p. 154). 

GREUM, HEINRICH. 

In the autumn of 1608 Heinrich Greum appeared as a player 
at Frankfort, Germany. He was then in company with Robert 
Arzschar and Rudolf Beart (Herz, p. 53). 

GREVILLE, CURTIS. 

Curtis Greville is named in the i6iz Herbert lists of both the 
Palsgrave's and the Lady Elizabeth's players (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 63). In explanation of this apparently dual connection 
it is suggested that when the new Fortune was building in i62.z, 
and the Palsgrave's men were preparing to open the playhouse, 
Greville joined them from the Lady Elizabeth's men (Murray, 
i. xi5-i6). Subsequently he passed to the King's men, for his 
name appears in the casts or stage-directions of the following 
plays acted by that company (Murray, i. opp. lyx): Latinus, a 
player, in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed October 11, i6i6); 
Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed November ^4, i6i8); and a 
merchant, in Massinger's Believe as You List (licensed May 7, 
1 631). He is also generally taken to be the "Curtis" of the stage- 
directions to The Two Noble Kinsmen, printed in 1634 as "Pre- 
sented at the Blackfriars by the Kings Maiesties servants, with 
great applause." He appears as a messenger, IV. ii. 75, and with 
"T. Tucke" (?Thomas Tuckfeild) as an attendant, V. iii (Brooke, 
Shak. Apoc, pp. 337, 344). 

165 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

GREY, MARGARET. 
See Margaret Gray. 

GRIFFIN. 

Griffin acted the part of Athanasia in Frederick and Basilea, pre- 
sented by the Admiral's men in June, 1597 (H.P., p. 153). 

GRIMES, ARTHUR. 

On March 16, 1615, Herbert issued a license to a company of 
players under the leadership of Ellis Guest, Thomas Swinnerton, 
and Arthur Grimes. These men visited Leicester on March 6, 
i6x6, and were given a reward of £1 (Murray, ii. loi, 102.). 
Arthur Grimes may be identical with Anthony Grymes, for both 
were associated with Guest, and "Arthur" may be a clerical 
error for "Anthony," or vice versa. 

GRYMES, ANTHONY. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
1 6x8, Anthony Grymes is recorded at Norwich on July z of the 
same year (Murray, ii. 103). Possibly he is to be identified with 
Arthur Grimes Qq^.v.'). 

GRYMES, THOMAS. 

A member of the Chapel Royal about 1600-01. In Henry Clif- 
ton's complaint to the Star Chamber on December 15, 1601, as 
to how boys were pressed for the Chapel at Blackfriars, Thomas 
Grymes is named as one so taken, and is described with Philip 
Pykman as "apprentices to Richard and Georg Chambers" (Wal- 
lace, Blackfriars, p. 80). 

GRYMMESBY, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 1413 (Hillebrand, Mod. 
Phil., xviii. 2.35). 

166 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

GRYNES. 

The Coventry accounts record a payment of 5J-. to one "Grynes 
& other players who came by warrant" during December, 1633 
(Murray, ii. X5x). 

GUE. 
See Gew. 

GUEST, ELLIS. 

From 16x5 to 1634 Ellis Guest was engaged in the leadership of 
a company of players known only in provincial records. On March 
16, 16x5, Herbert issued a license to Ellis Guest, Thomas Swin- 
nerton, and Arthur Grimes. The company visited Norwich on 
May x8, 16x5, and Leicester on March 6, 16x6. On June 7, 16x8, 
a new license was granted to Guest and his company, which is 
recorded at Norwich on July x of the same year. He again visited 
Norwich on June xy, 16x9, describing himself as one of the com- 
pany of Joseph Moore, Alexander Foster, Robert Guilman, and 
John Townsend, i.e. the Lady Elizabeth's company, presenting a 
warrant dated June 8, 16x9, and affirming that his fellows were 
at Thetford. The town clerk doubtless made a mistake in the 
entry, or else the license was spurious, for Guest is not otherwise 
connected with the Lady Elizabeth's men and there is no further 
clue to such a license of this date. He did not play, but the Nor- 
wich authorities gave him a gratuity of 40J., which he "thank- 
fully accepted." During 16x9 he also visited Leicester, and on (?) 
November ix, 1630, Reading. On July 15, 1631, a license was 
issued to him and Richard Errington, and these two players are 
named in the Reading accounts on July 18 of the same year. Up to 
this date the troupe seems to have been an unpatronized organi- 
zation; but subsequently Queen Henrietta apparently took it 
under her patronage, for on June xx, 1633, the Norwich annals 
record a visit of "Elias Gost and his Company of the Quenes 
players." On June X5, 1634, he obtained another license, which he 

167 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

presented at Norwich on September 13, of the same year (Mur- 
ray, ii. 101-05, 316, 317, 352., 353, 354, 355-56, 386-87). That is 
the last we hear of Guest. 

GUILMAN, ROBERT. 

Robert Guilman's name appears in a warrant of June 30, 162.8, 
appointing as Grooms of the Chamber several of the Lady Eliza- 
beth's (Queen of Bohemia's) players; in a license granted to the 
Lady Elizabeth's men on December 9, i6x8; and in the Reading 
accounts of a visit by the company on December 7.^, 16x9 (Stopes, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94; Murray, i. 159; ii. 386). 

GUNNELL, RICHARD. 

Richard Gunnell appears as a Palsgrave's man in the patent of 
January 11, 1613 (^M.S.C, i. X75); in the lease of the Fortune on 
October 31, 161 8; and in the lease of the new Fortune on May zo, 
161.2. (H.F., pp. 2.-J, 19). By 162.7. he had become manager of the 
company (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). In addition to managing 
the troupe, he also wrote several plays that were licensed for 
the Palsgrave's men at the Fortune, but which are now lost 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 2.6, x8, 30^.): The Hungarian Lion (De- 
cember 4, 16x3), The Way to Content All Women, or How a Man may 
Please his Wife (April 17, 16x4), and possibly The Masque (No- 
vember 3, 16x4). To complete his versatility in the theatrical 
field, in 16x9 he and William Blagrove, Herbert's deputy, formed 
a partnership and built the Salisbury Court Playhouse, which 
was occupied by the Children of the King's Revels until about 
December, 163 1 (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 368-74). Gunnell and 
Blagrove probably served as managers. In the Middlesex County 
Records under the date of December 30, i6xx, a recognizance was 
entered "For the appearance of Richard Peagott bodymaker at 
the next Session of the Peace, to aunswer the complaint of Mr. 
Gunnell the Player" (JeafFreson, ii. 173). Gunnell contributed 
commendatory verses to Captain John Smith's A Description of 
New England (1616; Works, p. i8x): 

168 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

To that worthy and generous Gentleman^ my verie good friend, 

Captaine Smith 

May Fate thj Proiect prosper, that thy name 

May be eternised with liuing fame: 

Though foule Detraction Honour would peruert. 

And Enuie euer waits vpon desert: 

In spight of Pelias, when his hate lies colde, 

Returne as lason with a fleece of Golde. 

Then after-ages shall record thy praise. 

That a New England to this lie didst raise: 

And when thou dy'st (as all that Hue must die) 

Thy fame Hue heere; thou, with Eternitie. 

R: GuNNELL. 

Notices of Gunnell's family appear in the register of St. Giles, 
Cripplegate, 1614-30 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 3x0), among which are the 
records of the baptism of a daughter in 16x3 and of his own burial 
on January ix, 1630 (Malcolm, Londinium Redivivum, iii. 304). 
Leslie Hotson in his recent work. The Commonwealth and Restora- 
tion Stage (19x8), pp. 5X-53, gives an account of a lawsuit of 1654, 
in which the heirs of Gunnell are concerned (cf . William Winter- 
shall). According to the testimony submitted, Gunnell "died 
intestate in 1633 or 1634." These dates are not in agreement with 
the burial entry, given above, in Malcolm's Londinium Redivivum. 
Perhaps the Richard Gunnell buried on January xx, 1630, was the 
son of the actor, Thomas Jordan published an elegy on him in his 
Poeticall Varieties (1637): 

An Elegie on his Inestimable friend, Mr. Richard Gunnell, Gent. 

Goe sell your smiles for weeping, change your mirth 

For mourning dirges, lave the pretious earth 

Of my inestimable friend with teares 

(Fertill as them the cheeke of Aprill weares. 

When Flora propagates her blessing on 

Th' approaching DafFadills) under this stone 

Lyes his neglected ashes. Oh that they 

Who knew his vertues best should let his Clay 

Lye unregarded so, and not appeare 

169 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

With a full sorrow, in each eye a teare 

Once, daily ore his urne, how can they thinke 

A pleasing thought, sit and securely drinke 

In satiate carrowses; these are they 

Can lose both friends and sorrowes in one day 

(Not worth my observation) let me turne 

Againe to my sad duty, where ile mourne 

Till my corporeall essence doe become 

A glyding ri volet; and pay the summe 

To thy deare memory; my streame shall lend 

A drop to none les he hath lost a friend: 

The melancholly mad-man that will prove 

His passion for his Mistresse is but love, 

Were best be thrifty in his teares, for I 

Will not supply him though his mistresse dye; 

My ford is thine deare Gunnell and for thee 

My Christall Channell flowes so currently, 

Tagus and great Pactolus may be proud 

Of their red sands, let me my Rivers shrowd 

In course Meanders, where the waters shall 

In a griev'd murmure, Gunnell, Gunnell, call. 

It is for thee I flow, for thee I glide, 

I had retain'd my floods hadst thou not dyed. 

And little water birds shall chaunt this theame, 

Thy lordan mourner is a lordan streame. 

G WALTER, WILLIAM. 

William Gwalter, innholder, acquired on May 2.0, i6iz, a lease 
of one-sixth part of the Fortune playhouse. This lease was sur- 
rendered to Edward Alleyn on June 19, 16x3. On the following 
day, June xo, a new lease was granted to him of a moiety of the 
same sixth part. The other half of the sixth part was leased to 
Robert Leigh (Greg, H.P., p. 30). 

GYLLOME, POKE. 

Possibly Poke Gyllome was in 15 81 a player in the service of 
Alexander Houghton of Lea in Lancashire. On August 3, 1581, 
Houghton wrote (^Eli:^. Stage, i. x8o«.): "Yt ys my wyll that 
Thomas Houghton of Brynescoules my brother shall have all my 

170 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

instrumentes belonginge to mewsyckes and] all|maner of playe 
clothes yf he be mynded to keppe and doe keppe players. And yf he 
wyllnot keepe and maynteyne playeres then y t ys my wyll that Sir 
Thomas Heskethe Knyghte shall haue the same instrumentes and 
playe clothes. And I moste hertelye requyre the said Syr Thomas 
to be ffrendlye unto Poke Gyllome and William Shakshafte now 
dwellynge with me and ether to take theym unto his servyce or 
els to helpe theym to some good master." 

GYRDLER, RUSSELL. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

GYRKE, RICHARD. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, Eng- 
land, iv. 314-15). 

HALL, WILLIAM. 

William Hall's name appears in a warrant of May 10, i63X, ap- 
pointing as Grooms of the Chamber several of Prince Charles's 
men (Stopes, Jahrbtich, xlvi. 96). Subsequently he joined the 
King's Revels company, and played Mela, Seneca's brother, in 
Richards's Messallina, printed in 1640 as "acted with generall 
applause divers times by the Company of his Majesties Revells." 

HALLAWAIE, "THE YOUNGER." 

A member of the Children of Paul's, as shown by a record of 
Christ's Hospital on March 5, 1580: "Mr. Sebastian Westcott, of 
Paulls, is appointed to have Hallawaie the younger out of this 
House to be one of the singing children of the Cathedral Church 
of Paulls in this citie" (Eliz,. Stage, ii. i6«.). 

HALLEY, RICHARD. 

Richard Halley is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January ix, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 

171 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Slopes, J a hrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

HAMERTON, HENRY. 

Henry Hamerton's name appears in a warrant of December 11, 
1635, appointing several of Prince Charles's men as Grooms of 
the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 98). 

HAMERTON, STEPHEN. 
See Stephen Hammer ton. 

HAMLEN, ROBERT. 
See Robert Hamlett. 

HAMLETT, ROBERT. 

As a member of the Lady Elizabeth's company on August t^* 
1 61 1, Robert Hamlett (or Hamlen) with his fellow-actors gave 
Philip Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" 
of agreement. By March 2.0, 1616, he had joined Prince Charles's 
troupe, for on that date, with other members of the company, 
he signed a contract with Alleyn and Meade. He also signed an 
undated letter (c. 1616-17) from certain members of his company 
to Alleyn. With Prince Charles's men he took part in King 
James's funeral procession on May 7, 162.5 QH.P., pp. 18, 91, 93, 
iii; Murray, i. 161, 137). 

HAMLUC, W. 

W. Hamluc and W. Mago, appearing in the dramatis persona 
prefixed to Ford's Witch of Edmonton, were probably two of the 
minor actors in the tragedy (Ford, Works, iii. 175, 136}. Hamluc 
appears in a stage-direction, V. i: "Enter W. Hamluc with 
thatch and a lighted link." His name is also prefixed to speeches. 
The play, not printed until 1658, may have passed from Prince 
Charles's men to Queen Henrietta's men about 16x5, when the 

172- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

latter troupe was organized (Murray, i. r.-^Gn.'). The notice on 
the title-page assigns the play to the Prince's men, but Ezekiel 
Fenn and Theophilus Bird, both of whom are mentioned in the 
quarto, were members of the Queen's troupe, and are not trace- 
able in the Prince's company. 

HAMMERTON, STEPHEN. 

Stephen Hammerton seems to have begun his theatrical career 
with the King's Revels company before November iz, 163X5 when 
William Blagrove, who had organized the troupe at Salisbury 
Court in 16x9, and William Beeston Q^.v.') petitioned for the 
return of "a boy named Stephen Hamerton inveigled from them" 
and "imployed at the Blackfryars playhouse" as a member of the 
King's company. Evidently he did not return to his former 
managers, for the actor-list of Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase (i65x) 
assigns to him the part of Oriana (Works, iv. 314, 411); and this is 
thought to refer to a revival of the play by the King's men in 163 1 
(Fleay, Drama, i. ii5-i6). He is named as a King's man in a war- 
rant of January zz, 1641 (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). His name 
is appended to the dedicatory epistle of the 1647 folio of Beau- 
mont and Fletcher's plays, published by a group of the King's 
players (Works, i. p. x). Wright in Historia Histrionica (1699) says 
of him: "Amyntor ["a young gentleman of the Court" in Beau- 
mont and Fletcher's Maid's Tragedy] was played by Stephen 
Hammerton (who was at first a most noted and beautiful woman- 
actor, but afterwards he acted w^ith equal grace and applause a 
young lover's part)" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 405). The following 
allusion in the Epilogue to Suckling's Goblins (1646; Works, p. 
115) presumably is to him: 

O, if Stephen should be kill'd, 
Or miss the lady, how the plot is spill'd! 

He seems also to be referred to as the actor of Ferdinand, King of 
Murcia, in the Epilogue to Shirley's Doubtful Heir (1653): "How 
did king Stephen do, and t'other prince?" (Works, iv. 361); and 

173 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

as the actor of Master Wild in the quasi-Epilogue to Killigrew's 
Parson's Wedding (1663): "Think on 't: Stephen is as handsome, 
when the play is done, as Master Wild was in the scene. ... If 
you refuse, Stephen misses the wench, and then you cannot justly 
blame the poet; for, you know, they say that alone is enough to 
spoil the play" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xiv. 534, 535). On January xS, 
1648, Hammerton and other members of the King's company 
gave a bond to pay off an old Blackfriars debt to Michael Bowyer's 
heirs (Hotson, pp. 31-34). 

HAMMOND, JOHN. 

In 1494 John Hammond belonged to Henry VII's Court In- 
teriuders under the leadership of John English (Collier, i. 44). 

HAMOND. 

On January 13 and 14, 1565, the Earl of Worcester's company 
visited Haddon Hall, Derbyshire, under the leadership of one 
Hamond (-E//;^- Stage, ii. 1.1.6). 

HANLY, RICHARD. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
1 6x8, Richard Hanly is recorded at Norwich on July i of the same 
year (Murray, ii. 103). 

HANSON, NICHOLAS. 

On June 14, 16x3, Nicholas Hanson presented at Norwich a 
license dated May i8, i6ix, on behalf of an unnamed company of 
players. He appears as a King's Revels man at Coventry in April, 
1 6x8, and received payment on November x8 of the same year 
(Murray, ii. Z50, 347-48). At the time of the 16x3 visit to Nor- 
wich he was probably a member of the Revels company. 

HARRIS, JOHN. 

John Harris is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town (Murray, i. 179-80) . 

174 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HARRISON, JOHN. 

A player, whose daughter, Suzanna, by his wife Anne, was 
baptized at St. Helen's on January lo, i6ox QEli^. Stage, ii. 3x0). 

HARRISON, RICHARD. 

On October x, 1617, Richard Harrison and others of Queen 
Anne's company petitioned the Sessions of Peace against the 
various presentments that had been issued against them for not 
"repayringe the Highwayes neere the Red Bull" (JeafFreson, 
Middlesex County Records, ii. 170). 

HARRISON, WILLIAM. 

On March 6, 1584, the Earl of Worcester's players w^ere en- 
gaged in a dispute with the authorities at Leicester. In the ac- 
count of the quarrel there is an abstract of the patent granted to 
Worcester's men, dated January 14, 1583, naming William Har- 
rison as one of the licensees (^Elix.. Stage, ii. X2.2.). 

HART, CHARLES. 

Charles Hart, Shakespeare's grand-nephew, and presumably 
the son of William Hart Qq.v.'), was called the Burbage of his 
day. From Wright's Historia Histronica, 1699 (Hazlitt's Dodsley, 
XV. 404, 409-10), we learn that he and Clun "were bred up boys 
at the Blackfriars, and acted women's parts. Hart was Robinson's 
boy or apprentice; he acted the Duchess in the tragedy of The 
Cardinal, which was the first part that gave him reputation." 
The date at which he joined the King's men at Blackfriars is not 
known. At the closing of the theatres in 1641 and the beginning 
of the Civil War, he enlisted in the King's army as a lieutenant 
under Sir Thomas Dallison in Prince Rupert's regiment. In the 
winter of 1648 a number of players who survived the war formed 
a company and ventured to act cautiously at the Cockpit. During 
a presentation of Rollo, or the Bloody Brother, in which Hart is 
supposed to have played Otto, a group of soldiers plundered the 
playhouse and routed the players. Hart continued his theatrical 

175 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

career at the Cockpit after the Restoration. He signed the Peti- 
tion of the Cockpit Players on October 13, 1660; and he is named 
in the Articles of Agreement between Herbert and Killigrew on 
June 4, 1661. (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 94, 96, 1 13-14). His Majes- 
ty's Company of Comedians opened their new playhouse, the 
Theatre Royal, on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, Diary, iii. 107), under 
the management of Thomas Killigrew. As a member of the organi- 
zation Hart acted the following parts (Downes, Ros. Ang., pp. 
xxxiv, 2. ff.): Demetrius in The Humorous Lieutenant; Michael 
Perez in Rule a Wife and have a Wife; Mosca in The Fox (Volpone^; 
Amintor in The Maid's Tragedy; Arbaces in King and no King; 
Rollo in Rollo, Duke of Normandy; Welford in The Scornful Lady; 
Cassio in The Moor of Venice; Hotspur in King Henry the Fourth; 
Celadon in The Maiden Queen; Wildblood in The Mock Astrologer; 
Brutus in Julius Caesar; Cortez in The Indian Emperor; Manly in 
The Plain Dealer; Porphyrius in Tyrannick Love; Aureng Zeb in 
Aureng Zeb; Alexander in Alexander the Great; Marc Anthony in 
All for Love, or the World Well Lost; Aurelian in The Assignation, or 
Love in a Nunnery; Zipares in Mythridates, King of Pontus; Phra- 
artes in The Destruction of Jerusalem; Lord Delaware in The Black 
Prince; Almanzer in The Conqtiest of Granada; Massinissa in Sophon- 
isba, or Hannibal's Overthrow; and Othello, in Othello. Of his ex- 
cellence in several characters, Downes writes QRos. Ang. p. 16): 
"Mr. Hart, in the Part of Arbaces, in King and no King; Amintor, 
in The Maids Tragedy; Othello; Rollo; Brutus, in Julius Caesar; 
Alexander, towards the latter End of his Acting; if he Acted in 
any of these but once in a Fortnight, the House was fill'd as at a 
New Play, especially Alexander, he Acting that with such 
Grandeur and Agreeable Majesty, That one of the Court was 
pleas'd to Honour him with this Commendation; That Hart 
might Teach any King of Earth how to Comport himself; He was 
no less Inferior in Comedy; as Mosca in The Fox; Don John in The 
Chances; Wildblood in The Mock Astrologer; with sundry other 
Parts. In all the Comedies and Tragedies, as he was concern'd 

176 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

he Perform'd with that Exactness and Perfection, that not any 
of his Successors have Equall'd him." Not only an actor on the 
stage but also in the society scandals of his time, he became a 
star in amorous intrigue. He is accredited with being the first 
successful lover of the famous Nell Gwyn, whom he brought 
from an inconspicuous seller of oranges to an eminent actress, 
ultimately the mistress of Charles II. Samuel Pepys has pre- 
served some of the gossip in which Hart was concerned. Pepys 
writes, on August 1.6, 1667: "Nell is already left by my Lord 
Buckhurst; . . . and Hart, her great admirer, now hates her" 
(Diary, vii. 77); on December z8, 1667: "to the King's house and 
there saw The Mad Couple, which is but an ordinary play; but 
only Nell's and Hart's mad parts are most excellently done, but 
especially her's" (Diary, vii. X36); and, on April 7, 1668: "She 
[Mrs. Knepp, an actress] tells me mighty news, that my Lady 
Castlemayne is mightily in love with Hart of their house [King's 
playhouse] : and he is much with her in private, and she goes to 
him, and do give him many presents" (Diary, vii. 370). At the 
union of the Duke's and the King's companies in i68i. Hart was 
given a pension of ^os. a week by the united companies, and 
"never Acted more, by reason of his Malady; being Afflicted 
with the Stone and Gravel, of which he Dy'd some time after" 
(Downes, Ros. Ang., p. 39). He was buried on August 7.0, 1683, 
at Stanmore Magna, Middlesex, where he had a country house 
(Genest, i. 375 ; Pepys, Diary, vii. ~i~jn?). In Euterpe Restored (iGjiS), 
Flecknoe writes "The Praises of Richard Burbage," and closes 
(Collier, iii. X79): 

Such even the nicest critics must allow 

Burbage was once; and such Charles Hart is now. 

HART, WILLIAM. 

William Hart is named in a license of November x8, 1634, 
granted to a company under the leadership of William Daniel, 
and known as the King's Revels (Murray, ii. 8 f.). By January 

177 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

IX, 1636, he was associated with the King's men at Blackfriars, as 
shown by a Ticket of Privilege issued to the attendants "em- 
ployed by his Majesty's servants the players of the Blackfriars, 
and of special use to them both on the Stage and otherwise for 
his Majesty's disport and service" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 
As a King's man he also appears in the "Players Pass" of May 17, 
1636 (Murray, i. opp. lyx). Some critics have identified him with 
the Hart mentioned by Wright as Robinson's apprentice, but 
the latter is quite clearly Charles Hart Q^.v.^, the famous Restora- 
tion actor. Charles was no doubt the son of William Hart, 
Shakespeare's nephew (son of Joan Hart, Shakespeare's sister), 
who was buried at Stratford on March x8, 1639 (Variorum, iii. 
167). 

HARVEY. 

Apparently an actor or stage-attendant mentioned in / Henry 
IV, acted by the Chamberlain's men at the Theatre in 1597. Poins 
says in the course of a speech to the Prince, I. ii. 181 : "FalstafF, 
Harvey, Rossill, and Gadshill shall rob those men that we have 
already waylaid." But in the scene of the robbery, II. ii, the 
characters here called Harvey and Rossill are discovered to be 
Bardolph and Peto, which led to Theobald's suggestion that 
Harvey and Rossill were the actors who took the parts of Bar- 
dolph and Peto. A. Gaw (P.M.L./4., xl. 531) regards Harvey 
and Rossill, not as actors, but, as "ghost-names." 

HARVYE, WILLIAM. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
162.8, William Harvye is recorded at Norwich on July 2. of the 
same year (Murray, ii. 103). 

HAUGHTON, HUGH. 

Hugh Haughton is named in a license of November x8, 1634, 
granted to a company under the leadership of William Daniel, 
and known as the King's Revels (Murray, ii. 8 ff.). 

178 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HAWKINS, ALEXANDER. 

Alexander Hawkins appears as a lessee of the Second Black- 
friars in October, 1601, when Henry Evans deeded his property 
to him, and as a patentee for the Children of the Queen's Revels 
on February 4, 1604 (Adams, Playhouses, pp. xii, 2.15). 

HAWLEY, RICHARD. 

Richard Hawley is named as a King's man in the "Players 
Pass" issued on May 17, 1636 (Murray, i. opp. 17^). 

HAYSELL, GEORGE. 

Apparently as an Earl of Worcester's man, under license of 
February 6, 1583, George Haysell, "of Wisbiche in the He of Elye 
in the Countie of Cambridge," was concerned in the dispute with 
the Leicester authorities in March, 1584, at which date he was 
said to be "the chefe playor" QEliz- Stage, ii. Xii-i4). Possibly 
he is to be identified with the "Geo. Haysyll, of Cambridge," 
who, with others in December, 1575, made a complaint against 
the Bishop of Ely for "divers enormities and wrongs" committed 
by him and his officers QS.P.D. EUi., cv. 88). 

HEARNE, THOMAS. 

On July 2.7, 1597, Thomas Hearne bound himself to Henslowe 
to play with the Admiral's men for two years (H.D., i. ioi). 

HELLE, JOHN. 

On August 3, 1597, John Helle, a clown, borrowed loj. from 
Henslowe, and bound himself to play with the Admiral's men 
till Shrovetide (H.D., i. xoi). 

HEMINGES, JOHN. 

On March i, 16x9, a confirmation of arms was issued to "John 
Hemings of London Gent, of long tyme Servant to Queen Eliza- 
beth of happie Memory, also to King James hir Royal Successor 
and to King Charles his Sonne now raigning which John was 
Sonne and Heire of George Hemings of Draytwiche in the Countye 

179 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

of Worcester Gent" (Variorum, iii. i88). This is quite probably 
John Heminges the player, although Malone found records that 
led him to believe that Heminges was of Stratford origin (Vari- 
orum, iii. 187). The date and place of his birth are unknown. He 
had a wife Rebecca, and is plausibly identified with the John 
Heminges who was married on March 10, 1588, to Rebecca 
Knell, widow of William Knell, late of St. Mary's, Alderman- 
bury. The register of the same parish records the marriage of 
William Knell and Rebecca Edwards on January 30, 1586, and 
the burial of an older Willam Knell on September 14, 1578 (Vari- 
orum, iii. 471-71, 473«.). One of these is doubtless the Knell men- 
tioned in Heywood's An Apology for Actors (i6ix), where his 
Christian name is not given. Knell had belonged to Queen Eliza- 
beth's troupe, and Heminges possibly began his theatrical 
career with the same company. By May 6, 1593, however, he had 
joined Strange's men, for his name occurs on this date in the 
traveling license granted to the company by the Privy Council 
(Eli^. Stage, ii. 1x3). Subsequently he became associated with the 
Chamberlain's men, probably when the troupe was organized 
in 1594, for on December xi, 1596, he and George Bryan served 
as payees for Court performances of the company. From this date 
to April xo, 1603, he regularly appears, alone or with Pope or 
Cowley, as payee for the plays acted at Court by his troupe 
(Steele, pp. no, in, 113, 116, 117, ixo, izz, 1x5). With the same 
organization he had parts in two of Jonson's plays: Every Man in 
his Humor (1598) and Every Nlan out of his Humor (1599). In 1603 
the Chamberlain's company passed under royal patronage, and 
Heminges is named in the patent granted on May 19, 1603, to the 
King's men. He was actively engaged in the affairs of this com- 
pany until his death in 1630. His name appears in the 1613 folio 
list of Shakespearean players; in the procession list of March 15, 
1604; in the warrant of March 2.9, 161 5, to appear before the 
Privy Council for playing during Lent; in the patent of March 2.7, 
1619; in the livery-allowance lists of May 19, 1619, and April 7, 

180 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

i6xi; in the list of players taking part in King James's funeral 
procession on May 7, 16x5; in the patent of June X4, 16x5; and in 
the cloak allowance of May 6, 1619. He was doubtless chief 
director and business manager of the company, for he served as 
payee for the Court performances from December 3, 1603, to 
April 3, 1630 (Steele, pp. 133, 134, 137, 139, 143, 148, 150, i^x, 
156, 160, 161, 164, 167, 168, I7X, 175, 176, i8x, 189, 195, 196, 199, 
X07., X03, X05, xio, ii3, 2.16, 2.1.0, X3i, X35, X37, X38). He is in- 
troduced with his fellows of the King's men into the Induction 
to Marston's Malcontent (1604); and he is known from the actor- 
lists to have acted in the following plays presented by the com- 
pany (Murray, i. opp. 17X): Sejanus (1603), Volpone (1605), The 
Alchemist (1610), and Catiline (1611). This list seems to indicate 
that he ceased acting about 1611. Thereafter he not improbably 
gave his full time to the management of the business affairs of 
the troupe. John Roberts in his Answer to Pope (17x9) says that 
he was a tragedian, and was in partnership with Condell as a 
printer (Variorum, iii. 186), but neither assertion can be verified. 
Malone (Variorum, iii. 187) writes that "In some tract, of which 
I have forgot to preserve the title, he is said to have been the 
original performer of Falstaff." His "boy" John Rice (^.vO ^^oo^ 
part in the entertainment given by the Merchant Taylors in honor 
of King James on July 16, 1607; and "Heminge's boy" appeared 
in Chapman's Middle Temple and Lincoln's Inn Mask on February 
15, 1613 (Elii. Stage, ii. 3x1; iii. x6x). The Globe was destroyed 
by fire in June, 161 3, and Heminges is mentioned in a contem- 
porary ballad, entitled, A Sonnett upon the pittiful burneing of the 
Globe playhowse in London (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 311): 

Then with swolne eyes, like druncken Flemminges, 
Distressed stood old stuttering Heminges. 

In Jonson's Masque of Christmas (1616), Venus, a deaf tire-woman, 
says: "Master Burbage has been about and about with me, and 
so has old master Hemings too" (Works, vii. X63). His personal 

181 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

relations with his fellows are reflected in the wills of Augustine 
Phillips (1605), who named him as legatee and overseer, and 
executor if "my wyfe do at any tyme marrye after my decease"; 
of Alexander Cooke (1614), who appointed him trustee and called 
him his "master"; of William Shakespeare (1616), who be- 
queathed him a memorial ring; of Richard Cowley (1618), to 
which he was a witness; of John Underwood (16x4) and Henry 
Condell (1617), both of whom designate him as legatee and over- 
seer; and in his appointment as trustee for Shakespeare's Black- 
friars property in 1613 (Haliiwell-Phillipps, Outlines, ii. 31). His 
business ability seems to have been recognized by other com- 
panies than the King's, for in an entry preserved from the office- 
book of Sir George Buc he appears as agent for the ' 'four com- 
panys" in transactions with the Master of the Revels (Adams, 
Dram. Rec, p. 48): "[Received] Of John Hemminges, in the name 
of the four companys, for toleration in the holy-dayes, 44^. 
January x^, 1618." That there was a union of four companies 
after Shakespeare's death in 1616, we learn from Malone (Vari- 
orum, iii. X2.4): "Soon after his death, four of the principal com- 
panies then subsisting, made a union, and were afterwards called 
The United Companies; but I know not precisely in what this 
union consisted." Heminge's character undoubtedly fitted him 
to discharge with ability and credit his duties as agent for 
the allied theatrical organizations. Another suggestive record 
of his relations with the actors of the day is an entry in Edward 
Alleyn's diary under the date of June 4, i6xz: "I dind wt Mr. 
Hemings" (Warner, p. 19^). This probably records only one of 
many such dinners, at which the affairs of the various companies 
were discussed. Heminges for some years lived in the parish of 
St. Mary's, Aldermanbury, where he held the office of sidesman 
(Notes and Queries, 1896, x. no), and where the registers record 
his children: Alice (baptized November i, 1590; married John 
Atkins February 11, i6iz), Mary (baptized May 1.6, 159^; buried 
August 9, i59x), Judith (baptized August 2.9, 1593), Thomasine 

i8x 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(baptized January 15, 1595), Joan (baptized May i, 1596), John 
(baptized April x, 1598; buried June 17, 1598), John (baptized 
August IX, 1599), Beavis (baptized May %/\, 1601), William (bap- 
tized October 3, i6ox), George (baptized February it, 1604), 
Rebecca (baptized February 4, 1605), Elizabeth (baptized March 
6, 1608), Mary (baptized June xi, 1611; buried July X3, 161 1), 
and Swynnerton (buried June 8, 1613). His wife's burial is re- 
corded on September 2., 161 9, and his own, on October ix, 1630 
(Collier, iii. 308-10, 315). By 1619 he had apparently moved 
from the parish of St. Mary's, Aldermanbury, to the vicinity 
of the Globe, as shown by the documents of the Witter-Heminges 
lawsuit, that refer to Heminges's house near the Globe (Wallace, 
N.U.S., X. 33^): "And the said deft Hemmynges hath adioyninge 
therevnto vpon the same ground and soile [i.e. of the Globe] soe 
therewth demised and letten as is aforesaid a faire howse newe 
builded to his owne vse for wch he payeth but twentie shil- 
linges yearely in all at the most." As Heminges grew older he 
probably found his residence at St. Mary's too far from the play- 
house for his convenience as business manager of the King's men, 
and so built himself a house upon land that had been leased for 
the Globe (J. W. Hebel, The Plays of William Heminges, MS. 
thesis in the Cornell University Library, p. 5). The language of 
his will, dated October 9, 1630, seems to indicate that he was not 
living in St. Mary's at the time it was made, for he refers to the 
parish as "where I long lived, and whither I have bequeathed my 
body for burial." In his will (Collier, iii. 3i7-xo) he describes 
himself as "citizen and grocer of London." There is no evidence, 
however, that he was ever a tradesman, and how he obtained the 
freedom of the Grocers' Company we cannot tell. He names his 
son William sole executor and trustee for his younger and un- 
married children, appoints Cuthbert Burbage and "Mr. Rice," 
probably John Rice the player, overseers, and mentions as lega- 
tees his daughters Rebecca, wife of Captain William Smith, 
Margaret, wife of Thomas Sheppard, who is not named in the 

183 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

register, Elizabeth, and Mrs. Merefield, who was probably a 
widow, and his son-in-law John Atkins "and his now wife," 
and his grandson Richard Atkins; and he leaves igj-. each for 
memorial rings "unto every of my fellowes and sharers, his 
majesty's servants." Heminges fails to mention in his will his 
daughter, Thomasine, who may have died before 1630. She may, 
however, have become estranged from her father as a result of the 
Ostler-Heminges lawsuit of 1615-16 (Wallace, London Times, 
October x and 4, 1909). In 1611 the sixteen-year-old Thomasine 
had married William Ostler, a King's man, who was shortly 
afterwards admitted as a sharer in the Globe property. They 
evidently lived in Heminges's neighborhood, for on May 18, 
i6ix, their son Beaumont was baptized at St. Mary's, Alderman- 
bury. On December 16, 1614, Ostler died intestate, and six days 
after his death Thomasine procured Letters of Administration 
from the Archbishop of Canterbury. For safe keeping she deliv- 
ered to her father, to be held in trust for her, the leases for shares 
in the Globe and Blackfriars that had been acquired by her late 
husband. She lost no time in taking advantage of her freedom as 
a young widow, and, in spite of her father's remonstrances, was 
soon involved in a romantic episode with the rakish young Wal- 
ter Raleigh, son of Sir Walter, not long returned from Paris, where 
he had amused himself with playing knavish pranks on his tutor 
Ben Jonson (Jonson, Conversations, ed. Patterson, p. xy). Thom- 
asine fared badly in the romance, for in 161 5-1 6 she sued young 
Raleigh for insult and slander, and was awarded damages of £^50 
in default of his appearance in the Court of Barons. Evidently 
Heminges wished to restrain his daughter by withholding from 
her the income from her shares in the playhouses, for she is pic- 
tured as making unsuccessful appeals for funds. In 161 5, she 
brought suit in Chancery against her father, but the affair was 
settled out of court before the serving of the subpoena. Soon 
differences again arose, and Thomasine had a bill drawn up, 
suing her father for £600 damages for the detention of the shares 

184 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

and the profits. Again the case was apparently settled out of 
court, and the conclusion is not known. William Heminges (see 
J. W. Hebel, The Plays of William Heminges, MS. thesis, pp. 13 
fF.), who inherited his father's interest in the Globe and Black- 
friars, had been well educated, first at Westminster School, and 
later at Christ Church, Oxford, where he received his Master's 
degree in i6z8 (Wood, Ath. Oxon., iii. t-jj). William was not, it 
would seem, an actor; but he took enough "hours of recess" to 
compose several plays : The Coursing of a Hare, or the Mad Cap (li- 
censed for the Fortune playhouse, March, xGT,2.-T,y) is not extant, 
and was doubtless destroyed by Warburton's cook; The Fatal 
Contract, published in 1653 by A. P. and A. T., probably Andrew 
Pennycuicke (j^.v.^ and Anthony Turner (jj^.v.'), both former 
members of Queen Henrietta's troupe. He is also the author of an 
Elegy on Randolph's Finger (written about i630-3x), which con- 
tains the well-known lines "On the Time-Poets." The play- 
house shares that passed to William in 1630 were the result of 
many investments made by his father over an extended period. 
John Heminges was an original sharer in both the leases of the 
Globe in 1599 and of the Blackfriars in 1608. During the follow- 
ing years the business of the two playhouses prospered, and as 
the old "housekeepers" died or left the company, Heminges was 
financially able to increase his holdings, until at his death in 1630 
he appears to have controlled three-sixteenths of the Globe and 
two-eights of the Blackfriars. And some of these shares he had 
"injoyed . , . thirty yeeres without any molestacion, beeing the 
most of the sayd yeeres both player and housekeeper, and after 
hee gave over playing diverse yeeres" (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 
1. ff.; Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 3ix, 316). In i6i9hewas 
described as of "great lyveinge wealth and power" (Wallace, 
N.U.S., X. 311). Although William came into possession of these 
theatrical interests he apparently had nothing to do with the 
management of the playhouses with which his father had been 
so prominently connected. This is shown by one of the petitions 

185 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in the lawsuit of 1635, which says (Outlines, i. 316): "and his 
Sonne, William Heminges, fower yeers after, though hee never 
had anything to doe with the sayd stage, in joyed the same [i.e. 
the profits from the shares] without any trouble." During 1633 
and 1634 he sold his shares in both houses to John Shank, a 
King's man, for £506; and these transactions led to a petition 
by some of the other members of the King's company for the 
compulsory sale to them of shares from the larger shareholders 
(Outlines, i. 3ix-i7). From Shank's counter-petition we learn that 
William Heminges was in pecuniary straits, and that he had been 
imprisoned, possibly for debt. Shank says (Outlines, i. 314): 
"Your suppliant hath besides disbursed to the sayd William 
Hemings diverse other small summes of money since hee was in 
prison." John Heminges's greatest claim to fame and to our re- 
gard is his connection with Condell in the publication of the 
First Folio of Shakespeare's plays in 16x3. By their own state- 
ment these two men collected the plays of their friend and fellow- 
actor, and gave them to the press, with no desire for monetary 
profit. In July, 1896, an appropriate memorial to their memory 
was unveiled at St. Mary's, Aldermanbury, with the inscription: 
"To the memory of John Heminge and Henry Condell, fellow 
actors and personal friends of Shakespeare. They lived many 
years in this parish, and are buried here. To their disinterested 
efforts the world owes all that it calls Shakespeare. They alone 
collected his dramatic writings, regardless of pecuniary loss, 
and, without the hope of any profit, gave them to the world. 
They thus merit the gratitude of mankind." Heminges is al- 
luded to in Scott's Woodstock (i8z6). 

HENSLOWE, FRANCIS. 

Francis Henslowe, son of Richard and nephew of Philip Hens- 
lowe, first appears in an undated letter, about 1590, begging his 
uncle to obtain his release from "ye counter in Woodstret." 
Many entries in Henslowe's Diary and other accounts record 

186 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

his imprisonment on various charges of stealing and liability for 
debt, with the resultant requests for loans from his uncle. From 
January, 1593, to May, 1594, he was employed in Philip's busi- 
ness of pawnbroking. His earliest connection with a theatrical 
oraganization is recorded under date of May 8, 1593, conceivably 
an error for 1594, when he borrowed £15 "to laye downe for 
his share to the Quenes players" when he went with them into 
the country to play. On June i, 1595, he again had a loan of £9 
"to laye downe for his halfe share wth the company wch he 
dothe playe wth all," which is thought by Greg to refer to a 
troupe other than the Queen's. By March, 1605, he belonged to 
the company under the patronage of the Duke of Lennox, who 
may have taken over some members of the Queen's company at 
her death in 1603. On March i, 1605, Abraham Savery gave him a 
power of attorney to recover £40 from John Garland, forfeited 
on a bond "for the deliuere of a warrnt, which was mayd vnto 
me frome the gratious the duke of Linox"; and on March 16, 
1605, he gave his uncle a bond of £60 to observe articles of an 
agreement which he had made with Garland and Saverey, 
"his fFellowes, servantes to the most noble Prince the duke 
of Lennox." There was also an undated loan, made probably 
in 1604, of £7 by Philip Henslowe to his nephew "to goyne 
with owld Garlland and Symcockes and Saverey when they 
played in the duckes nam at ther laste goinge owt." He lived 
in the liberty of the Clink on the Bankside in 1594, in a house 
also on the Bankside called the Upper Ground in 1597, and 
in the parish of St. George's, Southwark, in 1606. On March 
30, 1606, he acknowledged a debt of £2. to one Benjamin 
Harrys of Newington. Both he and his wife died between 
this date and October 6, 1606, as shown by an entry of 
charges for their funerals, and an acquittance from John Filter 
to Philip Henslowe as administrator of Francis Henslowe, 
deceased (Greg, H.D., ii. zy-y-jS; H.P., pp. 62. ff.; Warner, 
pp. Z7, x8, 131, i3x). 

187 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HENSLOWE, PHILIP. 

Philip Henslowe, no doubt the greatest theatrical proprietor 
and manager of the Tudor-Stuart period, was the son of Edmond 
Henslowe of Sussex, Master of the Game in Ashdown and Brill 
Park. By 1577 he was Iving in the Liberty of the Clink, South- 
wark, where he continued to reside until his death in 1616. At 
first, he appears as a poor man and "servant" of one Woodward. 
Upon the death of his employer he married the widow, Agnes 
Woodward, and thus came into the possession of considerable 
property. Agnes Woodward had a daughter Joan, who in 1592. 
married Edward AUeyn, which union cemented the friendship 
between the families and led to the closest business and personal 
relations between Henslowe and AUeyn. In documents of 1584- 
87 Henslowe is described as "citizen and dyer of London," but 
he is not known to have been actively engaged as a dyer. He had 
a marked talent for gaining profit from investments, and soon 
amassed considerable wealth through various business transac- 
tions. He was also an important figure in other than purely mer- 
cenary matters. By i59X he was a Groom of the Chamber to 
Queen Elizabeth; in 1603, Gentleman Sewer of the Chamber to 
James I; in 1607, vestryman of St. Saviour's, Southwark; in 1608, 
churchwarden; in 1612., one of the governors of the free gram- 
mar school. His source of greatest profit was his position as owner 
and manager of playhouses; but he was also engaged in the 
manufacture of starch, in pawnbroking, in bear-bating, and in 
other commercial speculations of lesser importance. From at 
least 1587 onwards he was interested in theatrical property. In 
1587 he and John Cholmley entered into a partnership and built 
the Rose, about which playhouse little is known until February, 
1592., when it was occupied by Strange 's men under the leadership 
of Alleyn, an Admiral's man; in 1600 he and Alleyn erected the 
Fortune; in 161 3 he and Jacob Meade singed a contract with a 
carpenter named Gilbert Katherens for the erection of the Hope, 
which was used for both the performance of plays and the baiting 

188 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

of animals; and for a time he was probably manager of White- 
friars. Henslowe died on January 6, 1616, and was buried on 
January 10 in St. Saviour's church. His private and theatrical 
records remain as a most valuable collection for both dramatic 
and social history. (This sketch is abridged from Greg's detailed 
biography in his edition of Henslowe' s Diary, 1908, ii. pp. 1-147). 

HERIOT, HENRY. 

From 1547 to 1552. Henry Heriot seems to have been a Court 
Interluder, at a salary of £3 6j. %d. a year (Collier, i. 136; Eliz.. 
Stage, ii. 83). 

HETON, ROBERT. 

Robert Heton, who describes himself as "one of the Sewers of 
Her Majesty's Chamber Extraordinary," became manager of 
Salisbury Court about 1635, at which time the playhouse was 
occupied by the King's Revels. On February 8, 1637, he received 
payment for Court performances by the "Salisbury Court players" 
in October, 1635 (Steele, p. X54). On May ix, 1636, the play- 
houses were closed on account of the plague. When acting was 
resumed on October x, 1637, Queen Henrietta's men seem to have 
united with the Revels company as the Queen's players at Salis- 
bury Court, which was still under the management of Heton 
(Adams, Playhouses, pp. 379-80). 

HEWSE, RICHARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). He is obviously identical with the Richard Huse 
mentioned in the will of Sebastian Westcott, Master of Paul's, 
April 3, i58x (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 15^.). 

HEYWOOD, JOHN. 

Aside from his work as the author of several delightful farces, 
John Heywood probably took some part in the training or man- 
agement of the Children of Paul's. In March, 1538, there is re- 

189 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

corded a payment to one Heywood, who is generally identified 
with the dramatist: "Item geuen to Heywood playeng an enter- 
lude with his children bifore my lades grace"; in February, 155 1- 
5X, he seems to have been at Hatfield with Sebastian Westcott 
when the latter brought children to play before the Princess Eliza- 
beth; and in 1553 is mentioned a play "of childerne sett owte by 
Mr. Haywood" at Court. These entries are thought to refer to 
the Paul's boys, for whom Heywood in all probability wrote 
plays, although he is not known to have been their master (Elix.. 
Stage, ii. li ff., notes). 

HEYWOOD, THOMAS. 

Thomas Heywood was not only a dramatist of note and a 
writer of non-dramatic works both in prose and verse, but also 
a player. His earliest appearance as an actor is on March ^5, 
1598, when he bound himself to Henslowe for two years to play 
at the Rose, which was then occupied by the Admiral's men 
(H. D., i. X04). He wrote two plays for this company between 
December, 1598, and Febraury, 1599, after which date he dis- 
appears from the Diary until September, i6ox. During this in- 
terval he may have become associated with Derby's men, who 
in 1599 acted Edward IV, thought to be a play by Heywood. 
He reappears as a sharer in Worcester's company in the autumn 
of 1602., and on September i borrowed -ls. 6d. from Henslowe 
to buy silk garters (H.D., i. 781). From October x.i, 1602., 
to May 9, 1603, he appears as authorizing payments on 
behalf of Worcester's men. He and William Kempe served as 
payees for a Court performance by Worcester's troupe on January 
3, i6oi (Steele, p. 1x3). Early in the reign of James I the Earl of 
Worcester's men were taken into the patronage of Queen Anne; 
Heywood became a member of the Queen's troupe at its forma- 
tion late in 1603 or early in 1604, for his name appears in the un- 
dated draft license. In the dedication of his Gunaikeion (16x4) to 
the Earl of Worcester he refers to the transfer of the company by 

190 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Worcester to the Queen; "I was (my Lord) your creature, and 
(amongst other of your servants) you bestowed me vpon the 
excellent Princesse Q. Anne (to whose memorie I haue celebrated 
in these Papers the zeale of a subiect and a seruant) but by her 
lamented death your Gift (my Lord) is returned againe into 
your hands, being stil yours, either to keepe vnto your selfe, or 
to conferre where your noble disposition shall best please." 
With the Queen's company he continued till its dissolution at 
her death in 1619. We find him in the list of players receiving red 
cloth for the coronation procession of March 15, 1604; in both 
the patent of April 15, 1609, and the duplicate license issued on 
January 7, i6ix, to the traveling company under the patronage of 
the Queen; in the Baskerville documents of June, 161 6, and 
June, 1617 (^EliZ- Stage, ii. xx9, i3i, xt,j, X38); in the petition of 
October x, 1617, to the sessions of Peace against the various 
presentments that had been issued against the Queen's players 
for not "repayringe the Highwayes neere the Red Bull" (JeafFre- 
son, Middlesex, ii. 170); and at Queen Anne's funeral on May 13, 
1619. He seems to have been with the Queen's men at Norwich on 
May 6, 161 5, and May 31, 1617, for his name is given in the 
abstracts of the license in the Norwich records (Murray, i. 196; 
ii. 340, 343). After 1619 he is not traceable as an actor in the 
records of any of the companies. Nevertheless, there is a possi- 
bility that he continued on the stage for some years, as suggested 
by an epigram in the Musarum Delkiae (1640), in which he is 
told that "groveling on the stage" did not become his years 
(Heywood, ed. Bates, pp. xxxiii, Ixxi): 

To M.r. Thomas Heywood 

Thou hast writ much and art admit 'd by those 

Who love the easie ambling of thy prose; 

But yet thy pleasingest flight was somewhat high, 

When thou didst touch the angels Hyerarchie; 

Fly that way still, it will become thy age 

And better please then groveling on the stage. 

191 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records the baptism of 
the following children of Thomas Hayward, "a player": Mary, 
October 5, 1600; Joseph, June 5, 1603; Alice, September 16, 1604; 
Richard, September 5, 1605 (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 1918, p. 
856). In 1613 a Thomas Haywarde lived "neare Clarkenwell Hill" 
(WaUa.ce, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347), who was no doubt the actor-drama- 
tist. "Tho. Heywood, Poet," was buried at St. James, Clerken- 
well, on August 16, 1641 (Hovenden, iv. X48). His most im- 
portant non-dramatic work is the Apology for Actors, published 
in 1612. but written some years earlier, in which he defends 
players under three heads: Their Antiquity, Their Ancient 
Dignitie, and The True Use of their Quality. The quarto is ded- 
icated to the Earl of Worcester, the patron of the company of 
which Heywood was formerly a member. His mention of the 
older actors is praiseworthy, and his views on the art of acting 
are sane and cheerful. The volume appeared with commendatory 
verses by three of his fellow-actors : Richard Perkins, Christopher 
Beeston, and Robert Pallant. For a detailed biographical sketch 
of Heywood, see the Introduction to K. L. Bates's edition of his 
plays in the Belles -Lettres Series, and Otelia Cromwell, Thomas 
Heywood, in Yale Studies in English, 19x8. 

HILL, JOHN. 
See John Hull. 

HINSTOCK, ROBERT. 

As a Court Interluder Robert Hinstock is traceable in the 
records from 1538 to 1551 (Collier, i. 116, 117, 136; Eli^.. Stage, 
ii. 8i). 

HINT, ROBERT. 

Under a license dated November 10, 16x9, Robert Hint is named 
as a member of the Red Bull company that appeared at Reading 
on November 30 of the same year (Murray, ii. 386). 

I9Z 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HOBBES, THOMAS. 

Thomas Hobbes is named in a patent granted on March 30, 
1 610, to the company under the patronage of Prince Charles, 
then Duke of York, and known as the Duke of York's men 
(M. S. C, i. 2.J2.'). After Prince Henry's death in November, 
1 61 2., they became entitled to the designation of Prince Charles's 
players. On May 18, 1615, the Prince's men visited Norwich, 
where they were allowed to play eight days; the records give the 
names of John Garland, William Rowley, and Hobbes (Murray, 
ii. 340). He joined his fellows in signing an agreement with 
Alleyn and Meade on March xo, 161 6, and took part in King 
James's funeral procession on May 7, 16^5 QH. P., p. 91; Murray, 
i. 161, i37). Soon after the accession of Charles I, James's 
players came under his patronage, and several members of the 
old Prince Charles's company were no doubt transferred to the 
King's men. William Rowley is the only one of the Prince's 
troupe mentioned in the King's men's license of June Z4, 16x5; 
but Anthony Smith and William Penn, both former Prince's men, 
appear in the cast of Ford's Lover's Melancholy, licensed for the 
King's troupe on November 14, i6z8, and Hobbes is found with 
the King's men in 16x9. The omission of their names from the 
16x5 patent is not explained, but conceivably their transfer 
occurred about this time. As a King's man Hobbes appears in 
the livery allowance of May 6, 16x9; in a stage-direction to 
Massinger's Believe as You List (ed. Croker, p. 43), licensed May 
7, 163 1 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 33), where he is assigned the 
part of Calistus; and in the "Players Pass" of May 17, 1636 
(Murray, i. opp. i7x). He was living "att the upper end of 
Shoreditch" in 1613 (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 348). Rowley dedi- 
cated his Search for Money (1609) "To his entire and deare-esteemed 
friend, Maister Thomas Hobbs," who is doubtless the actor, 
although Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), the philosopher, re- 
membered chiefly for his treatise on the theory of politics under 
the title of Leviathan (1651), has also been suggested as the 

dedicatee. 

193 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HOLCOMBE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Holcombe began his theatrical career with the King's 
men as a boy, as shown by the testimony of John Shank in the 
Sharers' Papers of 1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 316). 
With this company he had parts in the following plays (Murray, 
i. opp. 172.): The Queen of Corinth (c. 1617); The Knight of Malta 
(c. 1618); Sir John van Olden Barnavelt (1619), in w^hich he acted 
the Provost's wife; The Custom of the Country (c. i6i9-io); The 
Little French Lawyer (c. i6xo); Women Pleased (c. i6zo); and The 
Prophetess (162.^). The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records 
the burial of a Thomas Holcome in September, 1615 (Malcolm, 
Lond. Rediv., iii. 304). 

HOLE, RICHARD. 

Richard Hole appears as a Court Interluder in 15x6 and 1530 
(Collier, i. 97, 115). 

HOLLAND, AARON. 

Aaron Holland was the builder of the Red Bull playhouse, 
about 1605 (Adams, Playhouses, p. ^^4). His sale of a seventh 
part of the Red Bull to Thomas Swinnerton Qq. v.') about 1605, 
and Swinnerton's subsequent transfer of the share to Philip 
Stone, who sold it to Thomas Woodford about i6ix-i3, led to 
disputes before the Court of Requests in 1613 and 1619 between 
Woodford and Holland (Wallace, N. U. S., ix. x^i ff.). Sisson 
writes Q"Keep the Widow Waking,'' in The Library, N. S., 192.7, viii. 
p. 2.35): "I have found a later record of a case in the Court of 
Chancery in 16x3-4 which concludes the story of his relations 
with the Red Bull, and recapitulates the incidents of his long 
struggle with Thomas Woodford, which he finally won. ... In 
the chancery suit, however, I find that Holland in his answer de- 
clares that he had sold not only all his share in the profits, but 
also his lease, before 6 November, 16x3, the date of his answer, 
though he reserved a small annuity to be derived from the theatre 
during his life. ' ' 

194 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HOLLAND, JOHN. 

In 2 Seven Deadly Sins, acted by Strange's men about 1590, 
Holland played a warder in Induction, an attendant in "Envy," 
and a captain in "Sloth" (Greg, H. P., p. i5x; JR. E. S., i. 162.)- 

HOLMAN, THOMAS. 

Thomas Holman is named in a license of December 30, 162.9, 
granted to a group of players, presumably the King's Revels, 
under the leadership of Robert Kimpton. They presented this 
license at Reading soon afterwards (Murray, ii. 13, 386). 

HOLT, JAMES. 

James Holt is known as a member of Queen Anne's company 
from its formation in 1603-04 to its dissolution in 1619. His name 
appears in the list of players receiving red cloth for the coronation 
procession of March 15, 1604; in both the patent of April 15, 
1609, and the duplicate license issued on January 7, i6ii, to the 
traveling company; in the Norwich records of May 6, 161 5, and 
May 31, 1 61 7; and at the Queen's funeral on May 13, 1619 (Eli^. 
Stage, ii. 2.2.^; M. S. C, i. 2.70; Murray, i. 196; ii. 340, 343). 

HOLT, JOHN. 

A "momer" who helped the Westminster boys with a pageant 
in 1 5 61, as shown by the payment "to John Holt momer in 
reward for attendance given of the children in the pageant." 
He may have been an actor, as suggested by the term "momer" 
(mummer). He is perhaps identical with the Yeoman of the 
Revels of that name, who helped the boys in 1564-65 : "Geuen to 
Mr. Holte yeoman of the reuells." Holt's tenure of the Yeoman- 
ship extended from 1547 to 15 71. He had a house to the north of 
the churchyard in the Blackfriars (Elix.. Stage, i. 73, 79; ii. jt, 492-)- 

HOLZHEW, BEHRENDT. 

During 161 4-1 5 Behrendt Holzhew was in Germany with a 
group of English players in the service of John Sigismund, 
Elector of Brandenburg (Cohn, p. Ixxxviii). 

195 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HONEYMAN, JOHN. 
See John Honyman. 

HONIMAN, JOHN. 
See John Honyman. 

HONNAN, RICHARD. 

Richard Honnan was a hired man of Prince Charles's company 
in 1640. In an order of April X5 he is named as a Prince's man who 
is not "to be hindered or diverted in his service by being impressed 
arrested, or otherwise molested, without leave first. asked" 
(Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi, 103). 

HONTE, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Hunt. 

HONYMAN, JOHN. 

John Honyman (the name is variously spelled Honeyman, 
Honiman, Hunnyman, Hunnieman) began his theatrical career 
with the King's company as a boy, as shown by the testimony 
of John Shank in the Sharers' Papers of 1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, 
Outlines, i. 316). He played the following parts with the King's 
men (Murray, i. opp. lyx): Domitilla, cousin-germane to Caesar, 
in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed October 11, i6x6); an un- 
assigned part in Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed November 
2.4, i6x8; Works, i. 6); Sophia, wife to Mathias, in Massinger's 
Picture (licensed June 8, 1619); Clarinda, daughter to Utrante, 
in Carlell's Deserving Favorite (16x9); a merchant in Massinger's 
Believe as You List (licensed May 7, 163 1); and a young factor, 
in Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase (a revival, 163 1). The register of 
St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records his burial in 1636 (Malcolm, 
Lond. Rediv., iii. 304). Thomas Jordan, a member of the Com- 
pany of his Majestie's Revels, published an epitaph on him 
in his Poeticall Varieties (1637): 

196 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

An Epitaph on his kind friend, M.r. lohn Honiman, Gent. 

Thou that couldst never weepe, and know'st not why 

Teares should be spent but in mans infancy, 

Come and repent thy error for here lyes 

A Theame for Angels to write Elegies, 

Had they the losse as w^e have; such a one 

As nature kild for his perfection, 

And when shee sends those vertues backe agen 

His stocke shall serve for twenty vertuous men. 

In Aprill dyed this Aprill to finde May 

In Paradise, or celebrate a day 

With some celestiall creature, had he beene 

Design'd for other then a Cherubin; 

Earth would have gave him choice; he w^as a man 

So sweetly good, that he who wisely can 

Describe at large, must such another be, 

Or court no Muses but Divinitie. 

Here will I rest, for feare the Readers eyes 

Vpon his urne become a Sacrifice. 

According to Thomas Davies (Dramatic Miscellanies, i. 183), 
Honyman was also a playwright (cf. Lawrence, R. E. S., iii. 
xio). Davies writes: 

John Hunnieman . . . was the author of a play, with the 
name of which I should be glad to enrich the dramatic catalogue, 
but I cannot learn whether it was a tragedy, a comedy, or a 
mixture of both. From a copy of verses to the author, by Sir 
Aston Cockaine, we are informed that this dramatic piece was 
much approved by the public: as Sir Aston's epistle contains the 
only information of Hunnieman's authorship, I shall transcribe 
it as a theatrical curiosity: 

To Mr. John Hunnieman 

On, hopeful youth, and let thy happy strain 
Redeem the glory of the stage again; 
Lessen the loss of Shakespeare's death, by thy 
Successful pen and fortunate phantasy. 
He did not only write but act, and so 
Thou dost not only act, but writest too. 

197 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Between you there no difference appears, 
But what may be made up with equal years. 
This is my suffrage, and I scorn my pen 
Should crown the heads of undeserving men. 

HOOPE, RICHARD. 

Richard Hoope borrowed £3 from Henslowe on January 14, 
i595(?). He is described as a "Lord chamberlenes man," but 
whether he was an actor or a private servant is not known 
CH. D., ii. x85). 

HORN, JAMES. 

James Horn is known as a King's man (Murray, i. 161, opp. 
lyz) in the actor-list of Beaumont and Fletcher's Pilgrim (c. i6ii); 
in King James's funeral procession on May 7, 1615; in Massinger's 
Roman Actor (licensed October 11, i6i6), where he seems to have 
played Entellus, a lictor; in Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed 
November 14, i6x8); and in the livery allowance of May 6, 
1619 (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 95). 

HORTON, EDWARD. 

As a King's man Edward Horton acted Mariana, sister to 
Lysander, in Carlell's Deserving Favorite (16x9; ed. Gray, p. 75). 
He seems also to have played in Beaumont and .Fletcher's Mad 
Lover (possibly in a revival about 1630), as noted in a stage- 
direction, II. i: "Enter Stremon and his Boy Ed. Hor." (Works, 
iii. 456). 

HOUGHTON, ROBERT. 

Robert Houghton was a member of Richard Bradshaw's com- 
pany, a troupe that got into trouble at Banbury in May, 1633. 
The town authorities becoming suspicious of the validity of the 
company's license, arrested the players, and notified the Privy 
Council. The players appeared before the Privy Council in June, 
and were soon discharged "upon bond given to be forthcoming 
whensoever they should be called for." In the examination of the 
players by the Banbury officials, Houghton testified on May x, 

198 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

1633, that he "came to this company the Thursday before Easter 
last, and played his part in stage plays at Sir William Spencer's 
[and] at Keinton two or three days this week"; and that he 
"received nothing but meat and drink" (Murray, ii. 106 fF., 
163 ff.). 

HOVELL, WILLIAM. 

On February xy, 161 5, a license was granted to William Hovell, 
William Perry, and Nathan May, as representatives of, presum- 
ably, the King's Revels company. Nothing is heard of these 
players in London, and their only recorded provincial appearance 
is at Norwich on June 17, 161 5. Their license was apparently 
condemned and withdrawn by an order of the Earl of Pembroke 
on July 16, 1616 (Murray, ii. 10, 340, 343). 

HOWARD, THOMAS. 

The registers of St. Saviour's record on March 4, 1598, the bap- 
tism of ' 'Francis Howard, daughter of Thomas, a player' ' (Bentley , 
T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8. p. 856). 

HOWELL, STEPHANUS. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 14x3 (Hillebrand, Mod. 
Phil., xviii. 2.35). 

HOWES, OLIVER. 

Oliver Howes's name appears in a warrant of June 30, 162.S, 
appointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Boehmia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94). 

HUBERT. 

Hubert and Gascoine appear as minor actors or stage-atten- 
dants who open the trap-door for Antiochus in Massinger's 
Believe as You List (ed. Croker, p. GG'), licensed for the King's men 
on May 7, 1631 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 33). 

199 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HUDSON, RICHARD. 

Richard Hudson, weaver, is mentioned as an unlicensed player 
of Hutton Bushell, Yorkshire, in i6ix QEliz,. Stage, i. 305«.)- 

HULL, JOHN. 

John Hull (or Hill) visited Frankfort in March, Nuremberg in 
April, 1600, and Frankfort at Easter, 1601, with a group of English 
players under the patronage of Maurice of Hesse (Herz, p. 38). 
"Alyce Hill, daughter of John, a player," was baptized at St. 
Saviour's, Southwark, on August 13, 1601 (Bentley, T. L. S., 
Nov. 15, 1918, p. 856). 

HUNNIEMAN, JOHN. 
See John Honyman. 

HL^^NIS, JOHN. 

A "ghost-name" in the Chapel records of payment on January 
11, I57X, for a performance at Court (Steele, p. 41). This is 
obviously a clerical error for William Hunnis, which led Chalmers 
to infer the existence of two Masters of the Chapel Royal by the 
name of Hunnis (Variorum, iii. 439). 

HL^T^IS, WILLIAM. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1566-97 (Stopes, Hunnis, 1910, 
Materialien, xxix). 

HUNNYMAN, JOHN. 
See John Honyman. 

HL^T, ROBERT. 

In December, 1631 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45), Robert Hunt 
played Jeffry in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, presented by "the 
high and mighty Prince Charles his servants, at the private 
house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. x, 6). Murray, 
i. XI9, gives the name as "Robert Huyt [White]." 

xoo 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HUNT, THOMAS. 

As an Admiral's man Thomas Hunt appears in the plots of 
Frederick and Basilea (1597), as servant, guard, lord, messenger, 
jailor; of Troilus andCressida (c. 1599); and of The Battle of Alcazar 
(c. 1600-01), as a Moor, attendant, and ambassador (H. P., pp. 
153, 154; Eli^. Stage, ii. 175). Nothing further is known of him 
until August X9, 1611, when he joined his fellow-actors of the 
Lady Elizabeth's troupe in giving Henslowe a bond of £500 to 
perform "certen articles" of agreement QH. P., pp. 18, iii). Bv 
April 15, 1 62.1, he seems to have belonged to the Palsgrave's 
men, when his name appears in a list of players of the Fortune 
company who dined with Alleyn (Warner, p. 188). Since he is 
not mentioned in the leases of 161 8 or i6xx, he was evidently 
not a shareholder in the Palsgrave's company that occupied the 
Fortune. He is probably identical with the Thomas Honte who 
received payment from the Admiral's men through Alleyn in 
October, 1596 (H. D., ii. x85). 

HUNTLEY, DICK. 

Apparently the book-holder (prompter) or an actor in Nashe's 
Summer's Last Will and Testament (Works, iii. 2.33), acted in 1592. 
at Croydon, possibly by members of Archbishop Whitgift's 
household (Elix.. Stage, iii. 451-53). As Will Summers enters 
"in his fooles coate but halfe on," he says (line 14): "Dick 
Huntley cryes, 'Begin, begin' : and all the whole house, "For 
shame, come away'; when I had my things but nov;^ brought me 
out of the Lawndry." 

HUSE, RICHARD. 
See Richard Hewse. 

HUTCHINSON, CHRISTOPHER. 

See Christopher Beeston. 

HUYT, ROBERT. 
See Robert Hunt. 

iOI 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

HYLL, NICHOLAS. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 14x3 (Hillebrand, Mod. 
Phil., xviii. X35). 

lOY, NICHOLAS. 
See Nicholas Joe. 

ISLIPP, ADAM. 

On May zo, i6ii, Adam Islipp, stationer, obtained a lease of 
one whole share in the Fortune playhouse (Greg, H. P., p. iiz). 

IVY, NICHOLAS. 
See Nicholas Joe. 

JACKSON. 

Jackson played Chester in Davenport's King John and Matilda, 
acted by Queen Henrietta's company at the Cockpit in Drury 
Lane, probably about 162.9 (Murray, i. opp. i-GG). 

JACKSON, EDWARD. 

A joint-lessee of the new Fortune playhouse, in which he 
obtained a whole share on May 7.0, 16x2. (Warner, p. 146). 

JAMES, RICHARD JONES'S BOY. 

James, Richard Jones's boy, fetched a loan from Henslowe on 
November 17, 1599 (H. D., ii. x86). He is perhaps identical with 
"Jones's boy" who played a waiting-maid and a beggar with the 
Admiral's men in Troilus andCressida, about 1599 (H. P., p. 154). 
The James who acted in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01) and in 
I Tamar Cam (1602.) may be either he or James Bristow (^. v?). 

JARMAN, ANTHONY. 

Anthony Jarman, carpenter, was a joint-lessee of the new 
Fortune playhouse, in which he obtained a whole share on May 
io, i6ix (Warner, p. Z44). 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

JARVICE. 

Apparently a musician at Salisbury Court when Glapthorne's 
Lady Mo f her was produced there in 1635: "Sucket. Ever, ever, 
whilst you live, Jarvice; the dauncers alwayes payes the musike" 
(Bullen, Old Plays, ii. i32.)- 

JEFFES, ANTHONY. 

Anthony JefFes may have been a Chamberlain's or a Pembroke's 
man before he became associated with the Admiral's company in 
1597 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 133, zoo). He is first known as an Admiral's 
man in the accounts dated October 11, 15 97, following the merger 
of the Admiral and Pembroke companies. He appears in Hens- 
lowe's records from October, 1597, to February, i6oi, as borrow- 
ing and repaying various amounts, as acknowledging company 
debts, and once as authorizing a payment n behalf of the Ad- 
miral's men (H. D., ii. x86-87). With the Admiral's troupe he 
played (H. P., pp. 153, 154; Elii. Stage, ii. 175) Young Mahamet 
in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01}, and Linus and a Moor in 
I Tamar Cam (i6oi). About Christmas, 1603, the Admiral's men 
were taken into the service of Prince Henry. As a member of the 
Prince's company, he appears in the coronation list of March 15, 
1604; in the patent of April 30, 1606; and in the household list 
of 1610 (Eli%,. Stage, ii. 186, 187, 188). Subsequently he seems to 
have retired, receiving £70 for his interest in the company, as 
shown by a letter from Charles Massey to Edward AUeyn, not 
dated, but from internal evidence written not long after the 
death of Prince Henry on November 6, i6iz (Warner, p. 36). 
Anthony, son of Richard Jeffes, baptized at St. Saviour's, South- 
wark, on December 14, 1578, may be the same whose marriage to 
Faith Jones is recorded on February 19, 1601. Children of Anthony 
JefFes, called "player," are entered in the registers of St. Giles's, 
Cripplegate, from June 11, i6ox, to May i, 1609; in later entries 
from May 30, 1610, to October 30, 1619, Anthony is described as 
"brewer" (Eli'^. Stage, ii. 32.4). 

X03 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

JEFFES, HUMPHREY. 

The relation, if any, between Anthony and Humphrey Jeffes is 
unknown, but the same early theatrical connection has been 
suggested for both — that they were Chamberlain's or Pembroke's 
men before they joined the Admiral's company in 1597 (Eli:(_. 
Stage, ii. 133, ioo). Humphrey's earliest appearance as an Ad- 
miral's man is in the list of October 11, 1597, following the union 
of the Admiral's and the Pembroke's troupes. From this date to 
September 9, i6ox, he is named in the accounts as borrowing 
and repaying various sums, as acknowledging company debts, 
and as authorizing a payment in one transaction for the troupe. 
On July 6, 1601, the tailor was paid for making Humphrey's suit 
for a part in The Six Yeomen of the West, a play that is now 
lost (H. D., ii. x87). As an Admiral's man he acted (H. P., pp. 
153, 154; Eliz- Stage, ii. 175) Muly Mahamet Xeque in The 
Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01); Otanes in i Tamar Cam (i6oi); and 
presumably a serving-man, addressed as "Humphery" (lines 
1767-68), in Look About You, published in 1600 as "lately played" 
by the Admiral's company (ed. Greg, p. viii). He has been con- 
jectured to be the "Humfrey" mentioned in the Folio 5 Henry 
VI, III. i. i: "Enter Sinklo, and Humfrey, with Crosse-bowes in 
their hands," which possibly refers to a production by Pembroke's 
men in 15 92.-93, or to a revival by the Chamberlain's men (Eliz.. 
Stage, ii. 12.9-30, zoo). About Christmas, 1603, the Admiral's 
men came under the patronage of Prince Henry. With the Prince's 
men he is named in the coronation list of March 15, 1604; in 
the patent of April 30, 1606; and in the household list of 1610 
(Eliz.. Stage, ii. 186, 187, 188). The Prince died in November, 
i6ix, and his players were taken into the service of the Palsgrave. 
Jeffes is mentioned in the new patent of January 11, 161 3, and in a 
warrant of March 2.9, 161 5, ordering certain players to appear 
before the Privy Council for playing during Lent (M.S.C., i. X75, 
372.). During 161 5-16 Charles Marshall, Humphrey Jeffes, and 
William Parr secured a duplicate of the 1613 patent to the Pals- 

2.04 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTOKS 

grave's men, organized a troupe, and traveled in the provinces. 
This duplicate warrant was condemned and withdrawn by order 
of the Earl of Pembroke on July i6, 1616 (Murray, ii. 4 fF.). The 
register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records his burial on August 
2.1, 1618. His daughter, Mary, was baptized at St. Saviour's, 
Southwark, on January t'^, 1601. The register of St. Saviour's 
records also, on October 2.7., 1599, the baptism of "Susan JefFes the 
supposed daughter of Humphrey JefFes" (Collier, Actors, p. xxx; 
Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19^8, p. 856). The last entry may not 
refer to the player. 

JENNYNGES, GILES. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

JOE, NICHOLAS. 

Nicholas Joe (or loy) was a member of the Chapel Royal in 
1509 and 15 II (Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. 2.44). Chambers 
(Elix.. Stage, ii. xyw., 32.4) gives the name as Ivy, which may be 
the correct reading. 

JOHNSON, HENRY. 

A gatherer at the Theatre. When he testified in the lawsuit 
between Cuthbert Burbage and Gyles Alleyn on April 2.6, 1600, 
he is described as a silk-weaver, fifty years old, of the parish of 
St. Leonard's, Shoreditch. In his deposition he says that "he was 
A gatherer of the profFyttes therof vnder James Burbage and 
John Braynes" (Wallace, N.U.S., xiii. 1.18, iix), that is at some 
period between the opening of the Theatre in 1576 and the death 
of Brayne in August, 1586. 

JOHNSON, RICHARD. 

Richard Johnson played Montanus, a knight, in Richards 's 
Messallina, the Roman Empress, printed in 1640 as "acted with 
generall applause divers times by the Company of his Majesties 
Revells." Fleay {Stage, pp. 330-31) identifies him with Richard 

Z05 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Whiting, of the Bradshaw company that got into trouble at 
Banbun^ in 1633, whose name is given in the second examination 
as "Richard Johnson, alias Bea . . ." The identification seems 
unlikely (cf. Murray, ii. logw.)- 

JOHNSON, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM. 

As one of the Earl of Leicester's men in i^jx William Johnson 
signed a letter addressed to the Earl requesting his continued 
patronage; and he is named in the license granted to Leicester's 
plavers on May 10, 1574 (M.S.C., i. xSi, 348). He became associ- 
ated with Queen Elizabeth's men when the troupe was first 
established in 1583; he is named in a London record that gives 
the personnel of the company at this time C^liZ- S^^g^, ii- 106). 
Apparently he remained with the Queen's men, for he is men- 
tioned in a document of June 30, 1588, concerning the non-pay- 
ment of subsidy by certain members of the company (M..S.C., i. 
354), and is referred to as a Queen's man in 1587. The registers of 
St. Giles's, Cripplegate, record the baptism on February 10, 1587, 
of "Comedia, base-borne daughter of Alice Bowker, and, as she 
saithe the father's name is William Johnson, one of the Queen's 
plaiers"; and the burial on March 3, 1593, of "Comedia, daughter 
of William Johnson, player" (Eli'Z,. Stage, ii. 3x4). He is a legatee 
in Tarlton's will dated September 3, 1588. He may be the William 
Johnson, vintner, who served as trustee for Shakespeare's Black- 
friars property from 1613 to 1618 (Lee, Shakespeare, pp. 459, 493). 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM. 

William Johnson, described as servant to Lord Clifford, is 
recorded at Coventr}' on January 9, 1640, with a company com- 
posed of players from various troupes. They received a payment 
of 48J. iJ. under date of November X5, 1640 (Murray, ii. 51, 154). 

xo6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

JONES, BARTHOLOMEW. 

Bartholomew Jones was a member of Richard Bradshaw's 
company, a troupe that was in trouble at Banbury in May, 1633. 
The town authorities, becoming suspicious of the validit}^ of the 
company's license, arrested the players, and notified the Priyy 
Council. The players appeared before the Privy Council in June, 
and were soon discharged "upon bond given to be forthcoming 
whensoever they should be called for." In the examination of 
the players by the Banbury officials, Jones testified on May i, 
1633, that he "has gone with this company up and down the 
country these two years, and has acted his part in divers places" 
(Murray, ii. 106 ff., 163 ff.). 

JONES, JACK. 

Apparently the actor or stage-attendant who assumed the part 
of Palmeda in i Tamar Cam, presented by the Admiral's men in 
1601. QH.P., pp. 15, 154). See John Jones. 

JONES, JAMES. 

James Jones appears in a license granted to the Children of the 
Revels to the late Queen Anne on April 9, 16x3 (Murray, i. -^61.; 
ii. i7i-73)- 

JONES, JOHN. 

The register of St. Bodolph Aldgate records the baptism of 
"John Jones soone to John Jones a Player in Houndsditch" on 
June 14, 1615. This actor is conjectured to be identical with Jack 
Jones (Denkinger, P. ALL. A., xli. loi). 

JONES, RICHARD. 

Richard Jones is named as a member of Worcester's troupe in 
the abstract of the license of January- 14, 1583, in the Leicester 
records (£//':<:. Stage, ii. 2.zz). On January- 3, 15 89, he transferred 
to Edward Alleyn his share in a stock of theatrical goods which 
he held jointly with Edward and John Alleyn and Robert Browne 

2.0J 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(H.P., p. 2.1). This conveyance seems to mark either a break-up 
of Worcester's men or an internal change in the organization of 
the Admiral's men, and thus there is some uncertainty as to 
whether Jones was at this date with the Worcester or the Ad- 
miral troupe. In i59X he joined Robert Browne's traveling com- 
pany, for he is named in a passport issued on February 10, i59i, 
by the Lord Admiral, giving permission for that company to 
travel on the Continent (Cohn, p. xxix). During i59X-93 the 
company, under the leadership of Browne, traveled in the Nether- 
lands and in Germany, visiting Arnhem and Frankfort. In the 
autumn of 1593 it was apparently disbanded. Jones certainly went 
back to England before September z, 1594, when he bought from 
Henslowe "a manes gowne of pechecoler Jn grayne" (H.D., i. X9). 
At this date he had no doubt already become associated with the 
Admiral's men at the Rose, with which troupe he seems to have 
continued during 1594-96. He appears as joint-payee with Alleyn 
and Singer for the Court performances by the Admiral's company 
in December and January, 1594-95 (Steele, p. 108). Subsequently 
he joined the Earl of Pembroke's men, for with several other 
members of this company he is complainant in a lawsuit during 
1597 against Francis Langley, builder and owner of the Swan 
playhouse (Wallace, Eng. Studien, xliii. 340; Adams, Playhouses, 
pp. 168-74). ^^ ^ result of the dissolution of Pembroke's company, 
caused by the production of The Isle of Dogs, Jones, on August 6, 
1597, bound himself to play with the Admiral's company at the 
Rose; on October 11 his name is found in the accounts of that 
troupe (H.D., i. 8z, zoz), and from this time until i6ox he appears 
in the Diary as an Admiral's man. He borrowed various sums 
from Henslowe, paid personal debts, served as a witness to oc- 
casional transactions, and joined his fellows in acknowledging 
the company's debts. As an Admiral's man (H.P., pp. 153, 154; 
Elix.. Stage, ii. 175) he played Priam in Troilus andCressida (c. 1599) 
and Silva in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01). By February 7-13, 
i6oz, he and Robert Shaw had left the Admiral's company, and 

zoS 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the two had received £50 at their departure (H.D., i. 164). 
Nothing further is heard of him until January 4, 1610, when he 
appears with his old leader Robert Browne, as patentees for the 
Children of the Queen's Revels company at Whitefriars (Adams, 
Playhouses, p. 318). A letter from Jones to Edward Alleyn (H.P., 
p. 33), conjecturally dated about 161 5 (Elix,. Stage, ii. xSy), im- 
plies that Jones was again going to Germany, probably with a 
company under John Green. About 1616, his wife, Harris, in- 
herited a lease of the Leopard's Head in Shoreditch from her 
father, as shown by a letter to Alleyn, undated, but from internal 
evidence written before Henslowe's death on January 6, 1616, or 
at least before Jones had heard of Henslowe's death (H.P., p. 94). 
Jones and his wife were then away from England, and they ap- 
parently remained on the Continent for an extended period. On 
April I, i6io, Harris Jones wrote to Alleyn from Danzig. She was 
then expecting to join her husband, who was "with the prince," 
probably George William, Elector of Brandenburg (Warner, p. 
53). By i6xz Jones was a "musician" in the service of Philip 
Julius, Duke of Wolgast. Two petitions from him are preserved 
QAcyct, Jahrbuch, xxxviii. zo9-io). On August 30, 16x3, he asked 
permission, with his fellows Johan Kostressen and Robert 
Dulandt, to leave Wolgast and return to England. On July 10, 
16x4, he wrote to the Duke that he had failed to get profitable 
employment in England, and asked to be taken again under his 
patronage. A Richard Jones is traceable in the Southwark token- 
books from 1588 to 1607, and is perhaps the same whose 
marriage to Anne Jube is recorded on February 14, 1602. (Eliz.. 
Stage, ii. 32.4). If this last record refers to the player, Harris was 
probably his second wife. A Richard Jones is recorded as a puppet- 
showman at Coventry on January ix, 1638 (Murray, ii. 2.53). 

JONES, ROBERT. 

Robert Jones appears with Robert Browne at Frankfort in 
September, i6ox (Herz, p. 18). This, however, may be an error for 

X09 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Richard Jones, who traveled extensively with Browne, whereas 
Robert Jones is not otherwise known in the Continental records. 
On June 3,1615, Robert Jones, Philip Rosseter, and others are named 
as patentees for the erection of Porter's Hall playhouse in Blackfriars 
(Adams, Playhouses, p. 343). He was one of the most eminent lut- 
enist-composers of his time(Fellowes,£»^. Mad. Comp.,pip. 2.66-68). 

JONNS, DANIEL. 

Daniel Jonns was Kempe's boy in Denmark during 1586. The 
Elsinore pay-roll for September, 1586, records that "Wilhelm 
Kempe, instrumentist, got two months' board money for himself 
and a boy named Daniel Jonns." He had entered the Danish ser- 
vice on June 17, and an extra month's pay was given him as a 
parting gift (Riis, Century Magazine, 1901, Ixi. 391). 

JONSON, BEN. 

Ben Jonson's career on the stage is obscure. John Aubrey 
(Lives, ii. it, 1x6) tells us that Jonson, following his military 
service in the Netherlands, "came over into England, and acted 
and wrote, but both ill, at the Green Curtaine, a kind of nursery 
or obscure playhouse, somewhere in the suburbes (I thinke 
towards Shoreditch or Clarkenwell)," and further that he "was 
never a good actor, but an excellent instructor." We have no 
evidence for Jonson's acting in Shoreditch or in Clerkenwell, and 
the earliest records associate him with Henslowe on the Bank- 
side. On July zo, 1597, Henslowe entered a loan of £4 to "Benge- 
men Johnson player," and on the same day opened an account 
under the heading, "Received of Bengemenes Johnsones Share," 
with an initial payment of 3.;. 9^., to which nothing more was 
added (H.D., ii. 189). This entry would seem to mean that Jonson 
had contemplated the acquisition of a share in the Admiral's 
troupe at the Rose, but proof is lacking. As a result of the pro- 
duction of The Isle of Dogs by Pembroke's men at the Swan about 
July, 1597, Jonson, who had a part in the writing of the play, 
was committed to the Marshalsea. His participation in this epi- 

xio 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

sode has led to the conjecture that he was a member of Pem- 
broke's company in 1597 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 131, 133). He is satirized 
as Horace in Dekker's Satiromastix (i6oi), which contains several 
allusions to his acting (Dekker, Works, i. xox, ^■■2.<^. Tucca taunts 
Horace with: "I ha seene thy shoulders lapt in a Plaiers old cast 
Cloake, like a Slie knaue as thou art: and when thou ranst mad 
for the death of Horatio: thou borrowedst a gowne of Roscius 
the Stager." Later, Tucca makes Horace admit that he had 
played at Paris Garden, i.e. the Swan: 

Tucca. . . . Thou hast been at Parris garden hast not? 

Horace. Yes Captaine, I ha plaide Zulziman there. 

Sir Vaughan. Then M. Horace you plaide the part of an honest 
man. 

Tucca. Death of Hercules, he could neuer play that part well 
in's life, no Fulkes you could not: thou call'st Demetrius lorney- 
man Poet, but thou putst vp a Supplication to be a poore lorney- 
man Player, and hadst beene still so, but that thou couldst not 
set a good face vpon't: thou hast forgot how thou amblest (in 
leather pilch) by a play-wagon, in the high way, and took'st 
mad leronimoes part, to get seruice among the Mimickes: and 
when the Stagerites banisht thee into the lie of Dogs, thou 
turn'dst Ban-dog (villanous Guy) & euer since bitest; therefore a 
aske if th'ast been at Parris-garden, because thou hast such I 
good mouth; thou baitst well, read, lege, saue thy selfe and read. 

The writer indicates that Jonson for a time had belonged to a 
traveling troupe, and had acted the part of Hieronimo in Kyd's 
ever-popular Spanish Tragedy, had later got service at the Sw^an, 
and had been wrecked through the performance of The Isle of 
Dogs. Since then, he had turned a bitter satirist, like the dogs at 
the bear and bull baiting houses at Paris Garden, and was biting 
other authors — namely Marston and Dekker. Perhaps this is a 
fairly accurate account of Jonson's career as an actor. In 1598 he 
achieved a great success with his play, Every Man in his Humor, 
and apparently he supported himself thereafter by writing. His 
most recent biographers are Herford and Simpson, Ben Jonson: 
the M.an and his Work (19x5). 

XII 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

JORDAN, THOMAS. 

Thomas Jordan is primarily a writer of the Commonwealth and 
Restoration periods, but did some acting before the closing of the 
playhouses in i6^x. He was at Norwich on March lo, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town; and he played Lepida, mother to Messallina, 
in Richards's Messallina, the Roman Empress, printed in 1640 as 
"acted with generall applause divers times by the Company of his 
Majesties Revells" (Murray, i. Z79-8i). He also contributed 
commendatory verses to Richards's play (ed. Skemp, p. 15), and 
to Rawlins's Rebellion (1640; Hazlitt's Dodsley, xiv. 9). Subse- 
quently he appeared as an actor in his own comedy. Money is an 
Ass (published in 1668, but probably acted much earlier), assum- 
ing the part of Captain Penniless (Genest, x. 118). Besides plays 
he also wrote masks and non-dramatic works both in verse and 
prose. His Poeticall Varieties (1637) contains epitaphs on the 
actors John Honyman and Richard Gunnell. Perhaps Jordan is to 
be chiefly remembered for his Prologue introducing the first 
English woman to appear in a regular drama on a public stage. 
The first professional English actress played the part of Desde- 
mona, probably on December 8, 1660. (Mrs. Coleman took the 
part of lanthe in The Siege of Rhodes, acted at the Cockpit in 1658, 
but this was an operatic or quasi-dramatic performance. See 
William Davenant.) The half-apologetic tone of the composi- 
tion shows that the experiment was approached with misgivings. 
Malone reprints the verses from a rare miscellany (Variorum, iii. 
12.8): 

A Prologue to introduce the first woman that came to 

act on the stage, in the tragedy called 

The Moor of Venice. 

I come, unknown to any of the rest. 
To tell you news; I saw the lady drest: 
The woman plays to-day: mistake me not. 
No man in gown, or page in petticoat: 

ziz 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

A woman to my knowledge; yet I can't, 

If I should die, make affidavit on't. 

Do you not twitter, gentlemen? I know 

You will be censuring: do it fairly though. 

'Tis possible a virtuous woman may 

Abhor all sorts of looseness, and yet play; 

Play on the stage, — where all eyes are upon her: — 

Shall we count that a crime, France counts an honour? 

In other kingdoms husbands safely trust 'em; 

The difference lies only in the custom. 

And let it be our custom, I advise; 

I'm sure this custom's better than th' excise. 

And may procure us custom: hearts of flint 

Will melt in passion, when a woman's in't. 

But gentlemen, you that as judges sit 

In the star-chamber of the house, the pit. 

Have modest thoughts of her; pray, do not run 

To give her visits when the play is done. 

With "damn me, your most humble servant, lady"; 

She knows these things as well as you, it may be: 

Not a bit there, dear gallants, she doth know 

Her own deserts, — and your temptations too. — 

But to the point: — In this reforming age 

We have intents to civilize the stage. 

Our women are defective, and so siz'd. 

You'd think they were some of the guard disguis'd: 

For, to speak truth, men act, that are between 

Forty and fifty, wenches of fifteen; 

With bone so large, and nerve so incompliant. 

When you call Desdemona, enter Giant. — 

We shall purge every thing that is unclean, 

Lascivious, scurrilous, impious, or obscene; 

And when we've put all things in this fair way, 

Barebones himself may come to see a play. 

JUBY, EDWARD. 

Edward Juby is named as an Admiral's man on December 14, 
1594, in the first list of the company in Henslowe's accounts. 
Thereafter until March 7, 1603, he appears in various records of 

ii3 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the Admiral's men as witnessing occasional transactions, as 
authorizing payments on behalf of the troupe, and as acknowledg- 
ing company debts (H.D., ii. x9o). With the Admiral's men 
(H.P., pp. 153, 154; EU^. Stage, ii. 175) he played the King in 
Frederick and Basilea (1597), Calcipius Bassa and Avero in The 
Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01), and Pitho and a Moor, in i Tamar 
Cam (i6ox). About Christmas, 1603, the Admiral's men were 
taken into the service of Prince Henry; and on March 14, 1604, 
Juby and Thomas Downton represented the Prince's men in their 
reckoning with Henslowe (H.D., i. 175). His name occurs in the 
coronation list of March 15, 1604; in the patent of April 30, 1606; 
and in the household list of 1610 (Elix,. Stage, ii. 186, 187, 188). 
He appears regularly as payee for the Court performances by the 
Prince's men from February 19, 1604, to June 18, i6ii, alone at 
all dates except the first, when he was joint-payee with Edward 
Alleyn (Steele, pp. 136, 138, 139, 140, 148, 152., 156, 159, i6i, 
164, 169, 171). The Prince died in November, i6iz, and his com- 
pany soon passed under the patronage of the Palsgrave. Juby is 
named in the new patent of January 11, 1613 (M.S.C., i. 2.75). 
He was payee for the Palsgrave's men's Court performances during 
the seasons of 1612.-13 and 1614-15 (Steele, pp. 175, 189). About 
1 61 3 he is mentioned, apparently as manager of the company, in 
Charles Massey's letter to Alleyn (H.P., p. 64). He and his wife 
dined, "vnlooktfor," with Alleyn on September 13, 1618 (Young, 
ii. 103). His name heads the list of the Palsgrave's men who 
leased the Fortune from Alleyn on October 31, 161 8 (Warner, p. 
i4x). The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records the 
baptism of the following children of Edward Juby, "player": 
Elizabeth, June 3, 1599; Thomas, September i-j, 1600; Francis, 
June 30, 1603; William, May X5, 1606; Edmund, November 8, 
1610; Marie, January x6, i6ix; Tabitha, September 15, 1614, 
buried August 11, 1617. On November xo, 1618, is recorded, 
"Edward Jubye a man buried in the church." This entry corre- 
sponds with the date of his disappearance from other records 

2-14 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 192.8, p. 856). Frances Juby, presum- 
ably his widow, was a shareholder in the lease of the Fortune, 
on May xo, iGix (Warner, p. 2.46). 

JUBY, RICHARD. 

With the Admiral's men Richard (Dick) Juby acted in The 
Battle of Alcazar (c. 1 600-01) as Abdula Rais and Tavora, and in 
I Tamar Cam (i6oi) as Chorus, Trebassus, Diaphines, trumpet, 
attendant, messenger, nobleman, and Cathayan in the Procession 
(H.P., pp. 153, 154; Eliz.. Stage, ii. 175-76). His son, Richard, 
was baptized at St. Saviour's, Southwark, on May i, 1602. (Eli^.. 
Stage, ii. 3x5). 

JUBY, WILLIAM (?). 

At various dates from January zo, 1599, to October xi, i6ox, a 
William Juby appears as authorizing payments on behalf of the 
Admiral's men, and must therefore have been a sharer in the 
company. There is no other evidence for him as an actor or sharer, 
and the name may be a clerical error for Edward (H.D., ii. X90; 
Eliz.. Stage, ii. i58«.). 

JUGLER, RICHARD. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

KAYNE, ANDREW. 
See Andrew Cane. 

KEMP, JOHN. 

On November x6, 1601, a company of English players, under 
the leadership of John Kemp, reached Miinster, following a tour 
on the Continent that had brought them to Cologne, Amsterdam, 
Redberg, and Steinfiirt. They presented five different comedies in 
English, and had a clown who performed in German between 
the acts (Herz, p. 11). 

XI 5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

KEMPE, WILLIAM. 

Apparently the earliest notice of William Kempe, one of the 
most famous of Elizabethan clowns, occurs in a letter from 
Thomas Doyley to the Earl of Leicester, dated at Calais on No- 
vember 12., 1585, in which he states: "There remayneth in Dun- 
kerk . . . also Mr Kemp, called Don Gulihelmo" (T. Wright, 
Elizabeth, ii. 2.68). He is generally identified with Leicester's 
comedian mentioned in Sir Philip Sidney's letter to Sir Francis 
Walsingham, dated at Utrecht on March Z4, 1586, as carrying 
despatches from the Low Countries to London: "I wrote to yow 
a letter by Will, my lord of Lester's jesting plaier" (Bruce, Shak. 
Soc. Papers, i. 89). From the Netherlands he seems to have gone 
to Denmark, as shown by the Elsinore pay-roll for September, 
1586, which records that "Wilhelm Kempe, instrumentist, got 
two months' board money for himself and a boy named Daniel 
Jonns." He had entered the Danish service on June 17, and re- 
ceived an extra month's pay as a parting gift (Riis, Century 
Magazine, 1901, Ixi. 391). His reputation as a clown was ob- 
viously already established in London by 1590, when An Almond 
for a Farrat was addressed (Nashe, Works, iii. 341) "To that Most 
Comicall and conceited Caualeire Monsieur du Kempe, lest- 
monger and Vice-gerent generall to the Ghost of Dicke Tarlton." 
The anonymous author, presumably Nashe, writes in the dedi- 
catory epistle: 

For coming from Venice the last Summer, and taking Bergamo 
in my w^aye homeward to England, it was my happe, soiourning 
there some foure or fiue dayes, to light in felowship with that 
famous Francatrip' Harlicken, who, perceiuing me to bee an 
English man by my habit and speech, asked me many particulars 
of the order and maner of our playes, which he termed by the 
name of representations: amongst other talke he enquired of me 
if I knew any such Parabolano here in London as Signior Chiarla- 
tano Kempino. Very well, (quoth I), and haue beene oft in his 
company. He, hearing me say so, began to embrace me a new, 
and offered me all the courtesie he colde for his sake, saying, 

2.16 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

although he knew him not, yet for the report he had hard of his 
pleasance, hee colde not but bee in loue with his perfections 
being absent. 

In Strange Newes (1592.) Nashe refers to one of Gabriel Harvey's 
comical actions, and concludes (Works, i. 187): "for what can bee 
made of a Ropemaker more than a Clowne? Will Kempe, I mis- 
trust it will fall to thy lot for a merriment, one of these dayes." 
By May 6, 1593, he belonged to Strange's men, as shown by the 
license giving permission for this company to travel in the prov- 
inces because of the closing of the London playhouses on account 
of the plague (Elix,. Stage, ii. 1x3). In 1594 A Knack to Know a 
Knave, played by Strange's company, was printed "With Kemps 
applauded Merrimentes of the men of Goteham, in receiuing the 
King into Goteham." These merriments appear quite jejune in 
print, but Kempe's personal appearance in the scene was no doubt 
taken as a guarantee of amusing clownage (see Hazlitt's Dodsley, 
vi. 565). In 1594 Strange's men passed under the patronage of the 
Lord Chamberlain. On March 15, 1595, Kempe served as joint- 
payee with Burbage and Shakespeare for plays given by the 
Chamberlain's men at Court in December, 1594 (Steele, pp. 107, 
108). As a Chamberlain's man he appears in the cast of Every Man 
in his Humor (1598), as given in the Jonson folio of 1616. He is 
alluded to by Carlo, in Jonson's Every Man out of his Humor, IV. 
vi: "Would I had one of Kemp's shoes to throw after you" 
(Works, ii. 157). He acted Peter in Romeo and Juliet (IV. v) and 
Dogberry in Much Ado about Nothing (IV. ii), as evidenced by the 
substitution of the name Kempe for the name of the character 
in the text of the two plays. His name appears in the 162.3 folio 
list of Shakespearean actors. A reference to him and the clown's 
tricks is found in The Pilgrimage to Parnassus (1597), V. 674 (ed. 
Macray, p. xx), a Cambridge University play, where Dromo, 
"drawing in a clowne with a rope," says: 

Why, what an ass art thou! dost thou not knowe a playe can- 
not be without a clowne? Clownes have bene thrust into playes 

XI7 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

by head and shoulders ever since Kempe could make a scurvey 
face. . . . Why, if thou canst but drawe thy mouth awrye, 
laye thy legg over thy stafFe, sawe a peece of cheese asunder with 
thy dagger, lape up drinke on the earth, I warrant thee theile 
laughe mightilie. 

There are frequent allusions to Kempe's jigs, and four, now lost, 
were entered in the Stationers' Registers during 1591-95 (Arber, 
ii. 197, 600, 669; iii. 50): "the thirde and last parte of Kempes 
Jigge"; "a pleasant newe Jigge of the broomeman," ascribed in 
the margin to Kempe; "Master Kempes Newe Jigge of the 
kitchen stufFe woman"; and, "Kemps newe Jygge betwixt a 
Souldiour and a Miser and Sym the clown." That he was also 
famous for his performance of jigs is shown by Marston, Scourge 
of Villainy (1598), Satire xi. 31 (Works, iii. 371): 

A hall, a hall! 
Room for the spheres, the orbs celestial 
Will dance Kempe's jig. 

E. Guilpin, Skialetheia (1598), Satire v (ed. Grosart, p. 55), 

writes : 

But oh purgation! you rotten-throated slaues 
Engarlanded with coney-catching knaues, 
Whores, Bedles, bawdes, and Sergeants filthily 
Chaunt Kemps ligge, or the Burgonians tragedy. 

Apparently he left the Chamberlain's company about 1599, for 
his name does not occur in the actor-list of Every Man out of his 
Humor (1599); and soon after the lease of the Globe on February 
zi, 1599, he sold his share to Shakespeare, Heminges, Phillips, 
and Pope (Adams, Playhouses, p. x4o). Perhaps his most famous 
escapade was his dance from London to Norwich, an account of 
which was published by himself in 1600, with the title: Kemps 
nine daies wonder. Performed in a daunce from London to Norwich. 
Containing the pleasure, paines and kinde entertainment of William 
Kemp betweene London and that Citty in his late Morrice. Wherein is 
somewhat set downe worth note; to reprooue the slaunders spred of him: 

2.18 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

many things merry, nothing hurtfull. Written by himselfe to satisfie his 
friends. The title-page depicts him as dancing the morris on the 
way to Norwich, "attended on by Thomas Slye my Taberer." 
The pamphlet is dedicated to Anne Fitton, whom he describes, 
not improbably by confusion with her sister Mary, as "Mayde 
of Honour to the most sacred Mayde Royall, Queene Elizabeth." 
In the dedicatory epistle he alludes to several (now unknown) 
ballads on his morris, deprecates their publication, and takes 
their spurious accounts as an excuse to publish his own authori- 
tative story. He also says: "I haue without good help daunct my 
selfe out of the world," which is possibly a punning allusion to 
his withdrawal from the company at the Globe. He describes 
himself as "Caualiero Kemp, head-master of Morrice-dauncers, 
high Head-borough of heighs, and onely tricker of your Trill- 
lilles and best bel-shangles betweene Sion and mount Surrey." 
At the completion of the trip he hung in the Guildhall at Nor- 
wich the buskins in which he had danced from London. As an 
Epilogue to his description he appended "Kemps humble request 
to the impudent generation of Ballad-makers and their coherents; 
that it would please their rascalities to pitty his paines in the 
great iourney he pretends, and not fill the country with lyes of 
his neuer done actes, as they did in his late Morrice to Norwich," 
and implies his proposed crossing of the English Channel from 
Dover to Calais (ed. Dyce, pp. xo, xx). Apparently he took the 
contemplated "great iourney," visiting both Germany and Italy; 
but he had returned to England by September x, 1601, as shown 
by an entry in the diary of one William Smith of Abingdon 
(Halliwell-Phillipps, Ludus Coventriae, p. 410): 

1 601, Sept. X. Kemp, mimus quidam, qui peregrinationem 
quandam in Germaniam et Italiam instituerat, post multos errores 
et infortunia sua reversus : multa refert de Anthonio Sherly equite 
aurato, quem Romae (legatum Persicum agentem) convenerat. 

On returning from his Continental tour, he seems to have joined 
Worcester's men. He borrowed xoj-. from Henslowe "for his 

X19 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

necessarye vsses" on March lo, 1602.; authorized payment for 
the troupe on August 2.z, i6oz; and had a suit purchased for him 
by the company early in September of the same year (H.D., ii. 
X9i). He and Thomas Heywood served as payees for a Court per- 
formance by Worcester's men on January 3, i6oi (Steele, p. 113). 
He is not traceable after the close of Elizabeth's reign. A William 
Kempe is recorded in the token-books of St. Saviour's, South- 
wark, as a resident of Samson's Rents in 1595, 1596, 1598, and 
1599, of Langley's New Rents in i6ox, and later near the old 
playhouse (Collier, Actors, p. 116; Rendle, Bankside, p. xxvi). 
Collier contends that he was alive and playing at Blackfriars in 
1605, but the statement cannot be verified, and Collier's proof is 
presumably a fabrication. The burial entry of "Kempe a man" at 
St. Saviour's on November x, 1603 (Rendle, Bankside, p. xxvii), 
agrees with the approximate date of Kempe 's disappearance from 
theatrical records; but without further evidence the notice can 
hardly be accepted as conclusive proof of his death in 1603, for 
the name was a common one in other parishes, as shown by ex- 
tracts from the registers (Collier, Actors, p. xxxvi). Kempe's 
popularity as a comedian is shown by numerous references to him 
and to his famous morris-dance. At Englefield, Dudley Carleton 
wrote to John Chamberlain on October 13, 1600: "In our way 
from Witham hither, we met a company of mad wenches, whereof 
Mrs. Mary Wroughton and young Stafford were ringleaders, who 
travelled from house to house, and to some places where they 
were little known, attended with a concert of musicians, as if 
they had undertaken the like adventure as Kemp did from London 
to Norwich" QS.P.D. Eliz-, cclxxv. 93). In Jack Drum's Enter- 
tainment Q1601'), I. 45, a character remarks (Simpson, Sch. of Shak., 
ii. 136): 

I had rather that Kemps Morice were their chat; 

For of foolish actions, may be theyle talke wisely, but of 

Wise intendments, most part talke like fooles. 

He and Burbage are introduced in propria persona into 2 Return from 

zzo 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Parnassus (1602.), a Cambridge University play, where he is 
greeted with an allusion to his "dancing the morrice ouer the 
Alpes" (see R. Burbage). In Westward Hoe (1607), V. i. Linstock 
says: " 'S foot, we'll dance to Norwich" (Webster, Works, i. 147). 
His visit to Italy and his meeting with Sir Anthony Sherley are 
dramatized in The Travels of Three English Brothers (1607), w^here he 
enters the play as one of the characters: 

Enter Kempe 

Sir Ant. Kempl bid him come in. Welcome, honest Will; And 
how doth all thy fellowes in England? 

Kemp. Why, like good fellowes, when they haue no money 
Hue vpon credit. 

Sir Ant. And what good new Plays haue you? 

Kemp. Many idle toyes, but the old play that Adam and Eue acted 
in bare action vnder the figge tree drawes most of the Gentlemen. 

Sir Ant. lesting Will. 

Kemp. In good earnest it doth, sir. 

Sir Ant. I partly credit thee, but what Playe of note haue you? 

Kemp. Many of name, some of note, especially one; the name 
was called Englands loy. Marry he was no Poet that wrote it! he 
drew more Connies in a purse-nette then euer were taken at any 
draught about London. 

For the entire scene, see John Day, Works, ed. Bullen, pp. 55 ff. 
In T. Weelkes, Ayres or Fantasticke Spirites (1608), appears the 
following song (Halliwell-Phillipps, Lud. Cov., p. 410): 

Since Robin Hood, Maid Marian, 

And little John are gone-a, 

The hobby-horse was quite forgot, 

When Kempe did dance alone-a. 

He did labour after the tabor 

For to dance: then into France 

He tooke paines 

To skip it; 

In hope of gaines 

He will trip it. 

On the toe, 

Diddle, diddle, doe. 

XXI 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

William Rowley in the address prefixed to his Search for Money 
(1609), speaks of "the wild morrise to Norrige" (ed. Collier, 
p. iv). Dekker, Gull's Horn-Book (1609), p. 11, writes: "Tarle- 
ton, Kemp, nor Singer, nor all the litter of Fooles that now 
come drawling behinde them, never played the clownes more 
naturally then the arrantest Sot of you all shall." Heywood, 
Apology (i6ii), p. 43, says :"Here I must needs remember Tarleton, 
in his time gratious with the queene, his soveraigne, and in the 
people's generall applause, whom succeeded Wil. Kemp, as wel 
in the favour of her majesty, as in the opinion and good thoughts 
of the generall audience." Jonson, Epigrams (1616), cxxxiii, re- 
marks: "Did dance the famous morris unto Norwich" (Works^ 
viii. ^34). R. Braithwaite, Remains after Death (1618), prints the 
following epitaph (Collier, iii. 355): 

Upon Kempe and his Morice, 

with his Epitaph 

Welcome from Norwich, Kempe: all joy, to see 

Thy safe returne moriscoed lustily! 

But out, alasse! how soone's thy morice done! 

When pipe and taber, all thy friends be gone. 

And leave thee now to dance the second part 

With feeble nature, not with nimble art: 

Then all thy triumphs, fraught with strains of mirth, 

Shall be cag'd up within a chest of earth. 

Shall be? they are. Thou'st danc'd thee out of breath, 

And now must take thy parting dance with Death. 

In R. Brome, Antipodes (1638), II. ii (Works, iii. i6o), we find: 

Letoy. Yes in the dayes of Tarlton and [of] Kempe, 
Before the stage was purg'd from barbarisme, 
And brought to the perfection it now shines with. 
Then fooles and jesters spent their wits, because 
The Poets were wise enough to save their owne 
For profitabler uses. 

KEMPSTON, ROBERT. 
See Robert Kimpton. 

2.1.2. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

KENDALL, RICHARD. 

Richard Kendall is recorded at Norwich on March lo, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town (Murray, i. 179-80). 

KENDALL, THOMAS. 

Thomas Kendall was a partner with Edward Kirkham and 
William Rasteli in the management of Blackfriars, as shown by 
Articles of Agreement signed on April zo, 1602.. On February 4, 
1604, he was a patentee for the Children of the Queen's Revels at 
Blackfriars (Adams, Playhouses, pp. xi3, 2.15). He died in 1608 
QElix,. Stage, ii. 317). 

KENDALL, WILLIAM. 

On December 8, 1597, William Kendall bound himself to 
Henslowe to play for two years with the Admiral's men at the 
Rose, with wages of ioj". a week when playing in London and 
5 J', a week in the country (H.D., ii. X9i). With this company he 
played Abdelmenen, an attendant, a ghost, and Hercules in The 
Battle of Alcazar, about 1600-01 (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 175-76; H.P., p. 
153). Although his name appears in no other records of the Ad- 
miral's men, or after they passed successively under the patronage 
of Prince Henry (1603) and the Palsgrave (1613), there is a pos- 
sibility that he advanced from a hired man in 1597 to an actor of 
some notoriety in 1614. During 1614, in the course of a wit- 
combat between William Fennor, a shifty rhymer and pamph- 
leteer, and John Taylor the Water Poet, Fennor boasts of his 
histrionic talent and mentions one Kendall, apparently a player 
(Fennor s Defence, in Taylor, Works, 1630, p. 314): 

And let me tell thee this, to calme thy rage, 

I chaleng'd Kendall on the Fortune Stage; 

And he did promise 'fore an Audience, 

For to oppose me, note the accidence: 

I set vp Bills, the people throng'd apace. 

With full intention to disgrace, or grace; 

The house was full, the trumpets twice had sounded: 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

And though he came not, I was not confounded, 

But stept vpon the Stage, and told them this; 

My aduerse would not come: not one did hisse: 

But flung me Theames : I then extempore 

Did blot his name from out their memorie, 

And pleased them all, in spight of one to braue me, 

Witnesse the ringing Plaudits that they gaue me. 

The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records the baptism on 
January 5, 161 5, of John Kendall, son of William, "a player." 
A "Wm. Kendall" was living in Maid-lane in i6io, and one was 
married to Bettris Seek on August i, 161 9 (Bentley, T.L.S., 
Nov. 15, 1918, p. 856). 

KENEDE, RICHARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. 112.). 

KERKE, JOHN. 
See John Kirke. 

KEYNE, ANDREW. 
See Andrew Cane. 

KEYSAR, ROBERT. 

Robert Keysar, a London goldsmith was a lessee of the second 
Blackfriars from about 1605 to 1608, during which period he was 
manager of the Children of the Revels. After the surrender of the 
lease of Blackfriars to Richard Burbage for the King's men in 
1608, he appears as payee for Court performances by the "Child- 
ren of Blackfriars" during the Christmas season of 1608-09. •'^^ 
the autumn of 1609 he and Philip Rosseter and others reorganized 
the Children, placing them at Whitefriars. During the winter of 
1609-10 he was payee for five plays given at Court by the "Child- 
ren of Whitefriars." He is not named in the new patent granted 
to Rosseter and others on January 4, 1610, when the troupe again 
became known by its old name of the Children of the Queen's 

ZZ4 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Revels; but he nevertheless appears as one of the sharers (Adams, 
Playhouses, pp. zi8-i9, xxi-i4, 3i7-xo). Walter Burre, the pub- 
lisher, in 1613 dedicated Beaumont and Fletcher's Knight of the 
Burning Pestle ' 'To his many waies endeered friend Maister Robert 
Keysar" (Beaumont and Fletcher, Works, vi. 4ii). 

KIMPTON, ROBERT. 

On December 30, 1619, a license was granted to a group of 
players under the leadership of Robert Kimpton (or Kempston), 
presumably the Children of the King's Revels. They presented 
the license at Reading soon afterwards. On September X3, 1631, 
he and John Carr were leaders of the "players of the Revells" at 
Coventry; and on September 8, 1632., Kimpton and his company 
visited Norwich (Murray, ii. 13, ^51, 354, 386). 

KING, ARTHUR. 

On July II, 1 5 81, Arthur King and Thomas Goodale, members 
of a company of players under the patronage of Lord Berkeley, 
w^ere committed to the Counter for having taken part in an affray 
with certain gentlemen of Gray's Inn (Harrison, England, iv. 32.0). 

KING, THOMAS. 

During 1586-87 Thomas King was on the Continent. The 
Elsinore pay-roll records that he was in the Danish service from 
June 17 to September 18, 1586. Soon he went to the Court of the 
Elector of Saxony, at Dresden, Germany, where he held an ap- 
pointment as actor-entertainer until July 17, 1587 (Cohn, pp. 
xxiii-xxvi; Riis, Century Magazine, Ixi. 391; Herz, p. 5). 

KINGMAN, PHILIP. 
See Philip Kingsman. 

KINGSMAN, PHILIP. 

Philip Kingsman (Kingman) was the leader of a company of 
players at Strassburg in August, 1596 (Cruger, Archiv, xv. 114). 
On June 3, 161 5, he and Philip Rosseter and others are named as 

2.25 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

patentees for the erection of Porter's Hall playhouse in Black- 
friars (Adams, Playhouses, p. 343). "Mr Kyngman the elder" 
served as a witness for Henslowe on April 16, 1599 (H.D., ii. 2.91). 

KINGSMAN, ROBERT. 

Robert Kingsman was a member of Robert Browne's troupe at 
Heidelberg, Frankfort, and Strassburg in 1599, and at Frankfort 
for Easter, 1601 (Herz, pp. 16, 17). Subsequently he gave up the 
life of a strolling player and became a tradesman in Strassburg, 
where Coryat saw him in 1603 and wrote that it was "a place 
of . . . passing fatnesse and fertility (as a certaine English 
Merchant told me called Robert Kingman an Herefordshire man 
borne, but then commorant in Strasbourg with his whole family 
when I was there)" (Coryat' s Crudities, ii. 183). Kingsman became 
a freeman of Strassburg, and was able to befriend his old leader 
Browne in 1618, and other players, when they visited the city 
(Herz, pp. 15, IX, 31, 37). 

KIRCK,JOHN. 

John Kirck (Kirckmann) was a member of a troupe of English 
players at the Danish Court during 1579-80 (Bolte, Jahrbuch, 
xxiii. 99 ff.). 

KIRCKMANN, JOHN. 
See John Kirck. 

KIRKE, JOHN. 

John Kirke (or Kerke) is named in a license of November 10, 
1619, as a member of the Red Bull company that visited Reading 
on November 30 of the same year (Murray, ii. 386), and in a 
warrant of December iz, 1635, appointing several of Prince 
Charles's men as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
98). He was also a playwright (W. J. Lawrence, "John Kirke, 
the Caroline Actor-Dramatist," Stud, in Phil., xxi. 586). The only 
extant play that may be assigned to him with certainty is The 

2.2.6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Seven Champions of Christendom, published in 1638 as "Acted at the 
Cocke-pit, and at the Red-Bull in St. Johns Streete, with a gen- 
erall liking." The title-page gives only Kirke's initials, "Written 
by J. K.," but his full name is found at the close of the dedicatory 
epistle addressed to "Master John Waite," and also in the entry 
in the Stationers' Registers on July 13, 1638 (Arber, iv. 4x4). 
In the same year he dedicated Henry Shirley's Martyred Soldier to 
Sir Kenelme Digby (Bullen, Old Flays, i. 171). Under date of June 
8, 164X5 Herbert records that he received from "Mr. Kirke" £i 
each ' 'for a new play which I burnte for the ribaldry and offense 
that was in it," and "for another new play called The Irishe 
Rebellion" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 39). Kirke's official position 
in the two transactions has not been determined, but he was not 
necessarily the author of either of the plays. At the closing of the 
playhouses he possibly became a merchant, as suggested by an 
epitaph in Thomas Jordan's A Nursery of Novelties, published 
without date: 

Epitaph on my worthy friend; Mr. John Kirk, Merchant 

Reader, within this Dormitory lies 
The wet memento of a Widdow's Eys; 
A Kirk, though not of Scotland, one in whom 
Loyalty liv'd and Faction found no room: 
No Conventincle Christian, but he died 
, A Kirk of England by the Mother's side. 

In brief, to let you know what you have lost. 
Kirk was a Temple of the Holy Ghost. 

KIRKHAM, EDWARD. 

Edward Kirkham, presumably Yeoman of the Revels, was 
associated with Thomas Kendall and William Rastell in the 
management of the Children of the Chapel at Blackfriars, as 
shown by Articles of Agreement signed on April xo, i6ox. He was 
a patentee for the Children of the Queen's Revels at Blackfriars 
on February 4, 1604, ^^^ payee for a Court performance by the 
Children later in the same month. In 1605 his company acted 

XX7 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Eastward Hoe without permission of the Lord Chamberlain, which 
led to the supp4ression of the troupe. Soon he became an assistant 
to Edward Pearce in the management of Paul's boys, for whom 
he served as payee on March 31, 1606, for two plays given at 
Court. About July z6, 1608, he formally withdrew from the 
Blackfriars syndicate (Adams, Playhouses, pp. ii3-ix; Steele, pp. 
138, 148). 

KITE. 
See Knight. 

KITE, JOHN. 

John Kite was a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, as shown by 
a payment to "mr kyte Cornisshe and other of the Chapell yt 
played affore ye king at Richemounte," dated December ^5, 1508. 
The juxtaposition of "kyte" and "Cornisshe" has led some 
critics to assume there was a person named Kit (Christopher) 
Cornish. He was later Archbishop of Armagh QEliZ- Stage, ii. 
Z9«., 30W.). 

KNAGGES, RICHARD. 

An unlicensed player of Moorsham, Yorkshire, in i6ix QEliz,. 
Stage, i. 305«.). 

KNELL, WILLIAM (?). 

Knell was a Queen's man, presumably at some date not later 
than 1588. He acted with Tarlton in The Famous Victories of Henry 
V, as told in Tarlton s Jests (1611): "Knel, then playing Henry 
the fift, hit Tarlton a sound boxe indeed, which made the people 
laugh the more" (Hazlitt, Jest-Books, ii. ii8). By 1588, it is 
thought, he was dead; the belief rests on the assumption that he 
is the William Knell whose widow married John Heminges (^.t^.) 
on March 10, 1588. Heywood mentions him with others as having 
flourished before his time, i.e. before about 1594 (^Apology, p. 43). 
He is lauded by Nashe in his Pierce Penilesse (i59x), where he is 
noticed with Tarlton, Alleyn, and Bentley (Works, i. xi5). An 

2.i8 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

undated letter from W. P. to Edward Alleyn refers to a theatrical 
wager that Alleyn could equal Knell or Bentley in any of their 
own parts (H.P., p. t^z). 

KNELLER, JAMES. 

James Kneller (or Sneller) is named in a license granted to the 
Children of the Revels to the late Queen Anne on April 9, 16x3 
(Murray, i. 7,6x; ii. xji.-jt,'). We hear no more of him until De- 
cember, 1 63 1 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45), when he played Autol- 
icus, an impostor's disciple, in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, 
presented by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his servants, 
at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. 
2., 6). His name appears in a warrant of May 10, i63i, appointing 
several of Prince Charles's men as Grooms of the Chamber 
(Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). 

KNIGHT. 

A company under the leadership of one Knight visited Leicester 
in 162.8, and received a reward of los. Apparently the same troupe 
again appeared at Leicester shortly afterwards, as evidenced by 
the payment of ioj-. to "Mr. Kite a playe[r] and his Companie" 
(Murray, ii. 106, 317). 

KNIGHT. 

Knight appears as book-keeper of the King's men on October 
iz, 1632., and October zi, 1633 (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. zi, 34). 

KNIGHT, ANTHONY. 

Anthony Knight is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December zy, 16Z4, to twenty-one men "imployed 
by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

KNIGHT, EDWARD. 

Edward Knight is mentioned in a Protection from Arrest 
granted by Herbert on December Z7, 16x4, to twenty-one men 

ZZ9 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

"imployed by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity 
of Playinge as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 74). In 16x3 he seems to have lived "att 
the George Alley in Gouldinge Lane" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
347). A person of the same name witnessed an agreement between 
Alleyn and certain of Prince Charles's men on March xo, 161 6 
(H.P., p. 91). 

KNIGHT, ROBERT. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). He is a legatee in the will of Sebastian Westcott, 
dated April 3, 1582., where he is mentioned among the "sometimes 
children of the said almenerey," i.e. St. Paul's (EUz_. Stage, ii. 
i5«.). 

KOSTRESSEN, JOHAN. 

Johan Kostressen was a musician in Germany in the service of 
Philip Julius, Duke of Wolgast, during 16x3. In a petition dated 
August 30, 16x3, he asked permission, with his fellows, Richard 
Jones and Robert Dulandt, to leave Wolgast and return to Eng- 
land (Meyer, Jahrbuch, xxxviii. 109). 

KRAFFT, JOHN. 

John Krafft was a member of a troupe of English players at the 
Danish Court during 1579-80 (Bolte, Jahrbuch, xxiii. 99 ff.). 

KYTE, JOHN. 
See John Kite. 

LACY, JOHN. 

John Lacy, who won considerable popularity as a comedian 
after the reopening of the theatres in 1660, was born near Don- 
caster, in Yorkshire. In 1631, Aubrey tells us, he had come to 
London "to the playhouse," the name of which is not specified, 
and was apprenticed to John Ogilby, a dancing-master QLives, ii. 
x8, loi). Presumably his training as a dancer was in connection 

2.30 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

with his theatrical pursuits; he is not known to have been a 
teacher of dancing, although this is sometimes inferred. During 
the Civil War he was a lieutenant and quartermaster under Lord 
Gerard. After the Restoration he joined the company formed out 
of "the scattered remnants" of players belonging to several of the 
older houses during the reign of Charles I. His Majesty's Company 
of Comedians opened their new playhouse, the Theatre Royal, 
on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, Diary, iii. 107), under the management 
of Thomas Killigrew. As a member of this organization Lacy had 
the following parts (Downes, Ros. Aug., pp. xxxiv, 2. fF.): Sir 
Politique Would-be in The Fox [Volpone]; Captain Otter in The 
Silent Woman; Ananias in The Alchemist; Sir Roger in The Scornful 
Lady; and Bessus, in King and no King. To this list other parts may 
be added from the frequent notices by Lacy's great admirer, 
Samuel Pepys, whose criticisms afford the most original com- 
mentary on the art of the popular comedian, both before and after 
the opening of the Theatre Royal. Pepys records on May xi, i66i: 
"We went to the Theatre to The French Dancing Master. . . . 
The play pleased us very well; but Lacy's part, the Dancing 
Master, the best in the world" (Diary, ii. Z2.5); and on May 8, 
1663: "To the Theatre Royal, being the second day of its being 
opened. . . . The play was The Humerous Lieutenant, a play that 
hath little good in it, nor much in the very part which, by the 
King's command. Lacy now acts instead of Clun" (Diary, iii. 
108). On four occasions Pepys praises Lacy as Johnny Thump, 
Sir Gervase's man, in Shirley's Changes, or Love in a Ma^e, one of 
his most celebrated parts: May xx, i66x: "The play hath little in 
it but Lacy's part of a country fellow, which he did to admira- 
tion"; June ID, 1663 : "The play is pretty good, but the life of the 
play is Lacy's part, the clown, which is most admirable"; May i, 
1667: "But a sorry play: only Lacy's clowne's part, which he did 
most admirably indeed; and I am glad to find the rogue at liberty 
again"; and April x8, 1668: "wherein very good mirth of Lacy, 
the clown, and Wintersell, the country-knight, his master" 

X3I 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Diary, ii. X2.6; iii. 154; vi. i8z; vii. 384). On June iz, 1663, he 
saw Robert Howard's The Committee, "a. merry but indifferent 
play, only Lacey's part, an Irish footman [Teague or Teg], is 
beyond imagination"; and again on August 13, 1667, "Lacy's 
part is so well performed that it would set off anything" (Diary, 
iii. 155; vii. 62.). Another of Lacy's most successful parts was 
Sauny in Sauny the Scot, or the Taming of the Shrew, which Pepys 
witnessed on April 9, 1667 (Diary, vi. X49 ff.). The play, altered 
from Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, is generally attributed to 
Lacy himself. On April 15, 1667, Pepys pronounced Edward 
Howard's Change of Crowns "the best that ever I saw at that house, 
being a great play and serious; only Lacy did act the country- 
gentleman come up to Court, who do abuse the Court with all 
the imaginable wit and plainness about selling of places, and 
doing everything for money." Charles II was angered by the 
effrontery of Lacy's characterization, and committed him to the 
porter's lodge. Upon his release Lacy insulted the author of the 
play, which resulted in a temporary closing of the playhouse by 
royal command (Diary, vi. X58, 2.6x). On July 13, 1667, Pepys 
heard that Lacy was dying (Diary, vii. 19); but the veteran 
comedian recovered and continued acting for several years. Per- 
haps he was not now so active as formerly. Pepys, on January 11, 
1669, when he saw Richard Brome's Jovial Crew, complained that 
it was "ill acted to what it was heretofore, in Clun's time, and 
when Lacy could dance"; and again, on January 19, 1669, he 
expressed disappointment in Lacy's dancing between the acts 
of CorneiUe's Horace, and for his "invention not extraordinary" 
(Diary, viii. 185, 191 ff.). John Evelyn also commends Lacy's 
acting of Teague in The Committee, as shown by an entry in 
his Diary under the date November 2.j, i66i, "where the 
mimic. Lacy, acted the Irish footman to. admiration" (Diary, 
i. 371). Genest, i. 30i, gives Lacy's later characters: Drench 
in The Dumb Lady (1669); Bayes in the Duke of Buckingham's 
Rehearsal (1671); Alderman Gripe in Love in a Wood (i6j£); 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

and Intrigo, in Love in the Dark (1675). Downes (Ros. Ang., p. 
16) chronicles his successes thus: 

For his Just Acting, all gave him due Praise, 

His part in The Cheats, Jony Thump, Teg, and Bayes, 

In these Four Excelling; the Court gave him the Bays. 

He was a great favorite with Charles II, who had Michael 
Wright to paint him in three of his more famous parts; Evelyn, 
on October 3, i66x, notes: "Visited Mr. Wright, a Scotsman, 
who had lived long at Rome, and was esteemed a good painter; 
. his best, in my opinion, is Lacy, the famous Roscius or 
comedian, whom he has painted in three dresses, as a gallant, a 
Presbyterian minister, and a Scotch highlander in his plaid" 
(Diary, i. 369). The three parts are either Galliard or Lord Vaux 
in the Duke of Newcastle's Variety (the identification is a moot 
question). Scruple in John Wilson's Cheats, and Sauny, in Sauny 
the Scot. Langbaine, Aubrey, and others following their error, 
have made the mistake of ascribing the third part to Teague 
(or Teg) in The Committee (cf. Planche, Cyclop, of Costume, ii. Z43). 
Besides Sauny the Scot, Lacy is the author of three comedies, 
stage-successes in his day and subsequently favorably noticed by 
some dramatic critics, although his genius appears rather flimsy 
(cf. Nicoll, Rest. Drama, pp. 1.00 fF.): The Old Troop, or Monsieur 
Raggou; The Dumb Lady, or the Farrier made Physician; and Sir 
Hercules Buffoon, or the Poetical Squire. He is mentioned by Scott in 
Woodstock (i8x6), and in an appended note entitled Cannibalism 
imputed to the Cavaliers. He died on September 17, 1681, and was 
buried "in the farther churchyard of St. Martyn's in the fields" 
(Aubrey, Lives, ii. i8). 

LANCASTER, SYLVESTER. 

Sylvester Lancaster seems to have been a hired man of Prince 
Charles's company. In an order of April Z5, 1640, he is named as 
a Prince's man who is not "to be hindered or diverted in his ser- 
vice by being impressed, arrested, or otherwise molested, with- 
out leave first asked" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). 

2-33 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

LANEHAM, JOHN. 

As one of the Earl of Leicester's men in 1572. John Laneham 
signed a letter addressed to the Earl requesting continued patron- 
age; he is named in the license granted to Leicester's players on 
May 10, 1574 CM.S.C, i. iSx, 348). He became associated with 
Queen Elizabeth's men when that troupe was first established in 
1583; his name is found in a London record that gives the person- 
nel of the company at this time (^Eli^- Stage, ii. 106). Apparently 
he remained with the Queen's men, for he is mentioned in a 
document of June 30, 1588, concerning the non-payment of subsidy 
by certain members of the company QM.S.C, i. 354), and was 
payee for a Court performance by the Queen's players on January 
I, 1591 (Steele, p. 100). Heywood mentions him with others as 
having flourished before his time, i.e. before about 1594 QApology, 
p. 43). The entry "Laneham" in Sir Thomas Moore is probably, as 
Tannenbaum suggests, a forgery. 

LANGLEY, FRANCIS. 

Francis Langley, goldsmith of London, was the builder in 1595 
of the Swan playhouse. He died in 1601 (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 
161, i6x, 176). 

LANMAN, HENRY. 

Proprietor of the Curtain playhouse from about i58z to 1592., 
and probably from as early as 1577, when it was built (Adams, 
Tlayhotises , pp. 76, 78 f., 83 fF.). 

LAU, HURFRIES DE. 

A member of the company of French players in England during 
1635, under the leadership of Josias de Soulas, better known by 
his stage-name of Josias Floridor C^.v.^, as shown by a warrant 
of May 5, 1635, granted to "Josias D'Aunay, Hurfries de Lau, 
and others, for to act playes at a new house in Drury-lane, during 
pleasure" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 61). 

2-34 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

LEBERWURST, HANS. 

The leader of a company of players at Leipzig, Germany, in 
April, 1613 (Grahan, Jahrbuch, xlv. 311). 

LEDBETTER, ROBERT. 

Robert Ledbetter was an Admiral's man in 1597, when he 
played Pedro in Frederick and Basilea (H.P., p. 153)- He is not 
otherwise known except on the Continent, where he is recorded 
as a member of Robert Browne's company at Frankfort in 1599, 
1601, and 1606 (Herz, p. 16; Meissner, Jahrbuch, xix. 1x5). 

LEE, ROBERT. 

Robert Lee (or Leigh) is first heard of as an attendant in The 
Dead Mans Fortune, possibly acted by the Admiral's men at the 
Theatre about 1590 (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 136; H.P., p. 151). He is pre- 
sumably the Robert Lee who, together with John Alleyn and 
Thomas Goodale, signed a bond to Edward Alleyn on May 18, 
1593 (Warner, p. 1x7), and who sold "a boock called the myller" 
to the Admiral's men for -los. on February ix, 1598 (H.D., ii. 
2.94). Subsequently he probably joined Worcester's men; the non- 
appearance of his name in Henslowe's records may be explained 
by the fact that he was not a sharer (Greg, H.D., ii. 2.^4). That 
he was a Worcester's man, however, seems quite likely, for he is 
found in Queen Anne's company, which was a continuation of the 
Worcester troupe after the change of patronage late in 1603. As a 
Queen's man he appears in the procession list of March 15, 1604; 
in a warrant of March 7, 1606; in both the license of April 15, 
1609, and the duplicate patent issued on January 7, i6ii, to the 
traveling company; in a warrant of March %^, 161 5, to appear 
before the Privy Council for playing during Lent; and at Queen 
Anne's funeral on May 13, 1619 (^Eliz. Stage, ii. 2.1.^, 135; M.S.C., 
i. 7.J0, 371; Murray, ii. 343). For the Court performances of 1613- 
16 he served as payee (Steele, pp. 184, 189, 195). He was possibly 
with the Queen's provincial company at Norwich on May 6, 
1615, and was certainly there on March 30, 1616, and May 31, 

2-35 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

1617 (Murray, ii. 340, 341, 343). By October 31, 1617, he had 
left the Queen's men and joined Philip Rosseter, William Perry, 
and Nicholas Long as patentees for the Queen's Revels company; 
he visited Norwich on August z^, 1618 (Murray, i. 191, 361; ii. 
345). Before May 13, 1619, when he appeared in the Queen's 
funeral procession, he had returned to the Queen's men. After the 
Queen's death her London troupe was known as the Players of 
the Revels at the Red Bull. Lee is noted in 162.2. as one of "the 
chiefe players" of this company (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63), and 
is named with Richard Perkins in a warrant of November, 162.x 
CM.S.C, i. i84). The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate record 
three of his children: Rachel (baptized November 2.1, 1596); 
Robert (baptized October ii, 1598); and Mary (buried April 3, 
1608). The last entry describes Lee as "a Stage player in Hounds- 
ditch." He is perhaps the Robert Lee of the same parish who 
married Constance Balderstone on February 8, 1595 (Denkinger, 
P.M.L.A., xli. 102.). In 162.3 he was living "in Clarkenwell 
Close" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). On June 2.0 of the same 
year he appears as a joint-lessee of the Fortune playhouse (Greg, 
H.F., p. 30). 

LEEKE, DAVID. 

In 1 5 71 David Leeke, Richard Winter, and John Singer were 
in arrears for board due Robert Betts, a deceased Canterbury 
painter. Plomer (Library, 1918, ix. 2.'^y) has suggested that these 
men may have been players, because another entry in the same 
inventory records that William Fidge and one Whetstone, pre- 
sumably actors, owed Betts "for their portions in buyinge of 
certen playe-bookes." 

LEIGH, ROBERT. 
See Robert Lee. 

LEVESON, ROBERT. 

On April 13, 1580, the Privy Council committed Robert Leve- 
son and Lawrence Dutton, players under the patronage of the 

X36 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Earl of Oxford, to the Marshalsea for taking part in an affray 
with certain gentlemen of the Inns of Court (Dasent, xi. 445). 

LILLIE, GEORGE. 

George Lillie's name appears in a warrant of June 30, 162.8, 
appointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94). 
Possibly he was a brother of John Lillie. 

LILLIE, JOHN. 

John Lillie's name appears in a warrant of June 30, 16x8, ap- 
pointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94). 
Possibly he was a brother of George Lillie. 

LISTER, EDWARD. 

Edward Lister, weaver, is mentioned as an unlicensed player 
of Allerston, Yorkshire, in i6ix (Eliz.. Stage, i. 305«.). 

LOFFDAY, THOMAS. 

See Thomas Loveday. 

LONG, NICHOLAS. 

On May xo, 1612., Nicholas Long was the leader of the Queen's 
Revels at Norwich. By March x, 161 4, he was manager of the 
Lady Elizabeth's players, appearing at Norwich on that date. 
He was again with the Queen's Revels on October 31, 1617, when 
a new troupe was organized under his leadership, associated. with 
Robert Lee, Philip Rosseter, and William Perry. The troupe 
visited Norwich on August Z9, 161 8. In February, i6io, he had 
left the Queen's Revels to take the management of an unnamed 
company, the only recorded appearance of which is at Norwich 
on May lo, of the same year (Murray, i. 360, 361; ii. 3, loi, 339, 
345). The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records his burial 
on January xi, i6xz (Eli'^. Stage, ii. 3x8). 

^37 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

LOVEDAY, THOMAS. 

Thomas Loveday is recorded at Norwich on March lo, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town (Murray, i. X79-8o). Perhaps he is to 
be identified with the Restoration actor of the same name who 
appears in the warrants for liveries to the King's company as 
early as July xg, 1661, and as late as February 8, 1667, probably 
1668 (Nicoll, Rest. Drama, pp. 3x5, 3x6). He is probably the 
Thomas LofFday recorded as a member of the company of English 
actors present at The Hague during 1644-45 (Hotson, p. xi). 

LOVEKYN, ARTHUR. 

A member of the Chapel Royal, 1509-13 (Brewer, L. <iT P. 
Henry VIII, i. i.pp. 15, 41, 461, 48X; ii. x. pp. 1448, 1453, 1463; 
Eliz- Stage, ii. i.-jn.^. 

LOVELL, THOMAS. 

Thomas Lovell is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town (Murray, i. X79-80). 

LOWE, NICHOLAS. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
16x8, Nicholas Lowe was at Norwich on July x of the same year 
(Murray, ii. 103). 

LOWIN, G. 

G. Lowin played Barnavelt's daughter in Sir John van Olden 
Barnavelt (ed. Frijlinck, pp. clx, 86), presented by the King's men 
in 1 61 9. Perhaps he was John Lowin's son. 

LOWIN, JOHN. 

A portrait of John Lowin, in the Ashmolean Museum at Ox- 
ford, bears the inscription: "1640, Aetat. 64." He may therefore 
be identified with the John, son of Richard Lowen, whose bap- 
tism is recorded in the register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, on 

X38 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

December 9, 1576 (Collier, iii. 391). Like his fellow, Robert 
Armin, he apparently began his career as an apprentice to a 
London goldsmith, as shown by the entry: "I, John Lowen, the 
Sonne of Richard Lowen of London . . . have put my self 
prentise to Nicholas Rudyard for the terme of eight years be- 
ginninge at Cirstmas in Anno 1593" (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 
97). He first appears as an actor during i6oz-o3 in Worcester's 
company with Henslowe at the Rose. From November ix, 1602., 
to March ii, 1603, he authorized payments on behalf of Wor- 
cester's men, and on the latter date borrowed 5J-. from Henslowe 
when he accompanied the troupe on a provincial tour (H.D., ii. 
Z95). During the course of the year he must have left Worcester's 
for the King's men, for he is named in the cast of Sejanus (1603), 
and is introduced into the Induction to The Malcontent (1604). 
Evidently he joined the King's company as a hired man, for his 
name is not given in the patent of May 19, 1603, or in the pro- 
cession list of March 15, 1604. Through a long life he continued 
with the King's men, ultimately becoming one of the most 
prominent members of the company. The register of St. Botolph, 
Bishopsgate, records the marriage of a John Lowen and Joan Hall, 
widow, on October ^9, 1607, "f. licent. ex officio facultatum" 
(Collier, iii. 396). He is presumably the John Lowen who lived 
in the liberty of the Clink, Southwark, and who, shortly after 
the marriage noted above, was paying a poor-rate of 2.d. a week. 
The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records, also, the mar- 
riage of a "John Lewin and Katheren Woodden, with license," on 
February i, 1610. John, son of John Lowin, "one of ye kings 
players," was baptized at St. Saviour's on January 19, 1639 (Bent- 
ley, T.LS., Nov. 15, 1918, p. 856). At various dates from 1601 
to 1641 the Southwark token books record his residence "near 
the playhouse" or in other parts of the parish; in 1617-18 he 
was overseer of Paris Garden; and in 16x3 he lived in Lam- 
beth (Collier, iii. 397 fF.; Rendle, Bankside, p. xxvi; Wallace, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 348; Chambers, Eli^. Stage, ii. 32.9). On August 

^-39 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

13, 162.0, he and his wife dined with Edward Alleyn (Warner, 
p. 185). He seems to have written one pamphlet, Conclusions 
upon Dances, both of this Age and of the Olde (1607), which is 
dedicated to Lord Dennie, November i}, 1606, and signed "I. L. 
Roscio"; Collier claimed to have found a copy with the note on 
the title-page: "By Jhon Lowin. Witnesseth Tho. D. 1610" 
(Collier, iii. 394-96). He is named in the will of John Underwood, 
dated October 4, 1614, as legatee and overseer. He appears as a 
King's man in the 16x3 folio list of Shakespearean players; in the 
patent of March xj, 1619; in the livery allowances of May 19, 
1619, and April 7, i6xi; in the submission of December 1.0, 162.4, 
for playing The Spanish Viceroy; at King James's funeral on May 
7, 162.5; ^^ ^^^ patent of June 2.4, 16x5; in the cloak allowance of 
May 6, 16x9 (^M.S.C, i. x8o, xBx; Murray, i. opp. 172.). On Oc- 
tober 2.4, 1633, he and Swanston craved the pardon of Herbert 
"for their ill manners" in acting an unpurged version of Fletcher's 
Woman's Prize, or the Tamer Tamed (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. xo ff.). 
His name appears in the warrants for liveries on April xx, 1637, 
March ix, 1639, and March xo, 1641 (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99, 
loi, 104). He had parts in the following plays (Murray, i. opp. 
17X): Volpone (1605); The Alchemist (1610); Catiline (1611); 
Valentinian (c. 1611-14); Bonduca (c. 1613-14); The Queen of 
Corinth (c. 1617); The Loyal Subject (161 8); The Knight of Malta 
(c. 1 61 8); The Mad Lover (c. 161 8); possibly Barnavelt in Sir John 
van Olden Barnavelt (1619; cf. Frijlinck, p. 86); The Humorous 
Lieutenant (c. 161 9); The Custom of the Country (c. i6i9-xo); The 
Double Marriage (c. 1619-xo); Bosola in The Duchess of Malfi (c. 
1619-X3); Women Pleased (c. 16x0); The Little French Lawyer (c. 
16x0); The False One (c. i6xo-xi); The Laws of Candy (c. 16x1); 
The Island Princess (c. 16x1); The Pilgrim (c. 16x1); The Spanish 
Curate (i6xx); The Sea Voyage (i6xx); The Prophetess (i6xx); 
Lovers Progress (16x3); The Maid in the Mill (16x3); Domitianus 
Caesar in The Roman Actor (licensed October 11, 16x6); Lover's 
Melancholy (licensed November X4, 16x8); Jacomo in The Deserving 

X40 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Favorite (published 16x9); Eubulus in The Picture (licensed June 
8, 16x9); Flaminius in Believe as You List (licensed May 7, 163 1); 
and Belleur, "most naturally acted," in The Wildgoose Chase (a 
revival, 163 1). He also appeared as Lepston in the Lord Mayor's 
Pageant produced by the goldsmiths in 161 1 (Denkinger, P.M. 
L.A., xli. 96). That he was a versatile player is evidenced by the 
numerous actor-lists citing his name. He and Joseph Taylor are 
mentioned in Alexander Gill's satirical verses on Jonson's 
Magnetic Lady in i6t^x (Jonson, Works, vi. 116): 

Lett Lownie cease, and Taylore feare to touch 
The loathed stage; for thou hast made ytt such. 

Besides playing he was concerned in the business management of 
the troupe. In 1635 he controlled two-sixteenths of the Globe 
and one-eighth of the Blackfriars, which shares he seems to have 
acquired after the death of Condell in 162.7 (Adams, Mod. Phil., 
xvii. 7 ff.; Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 3iz-i3). From this 
time to the closing of the playhouses in 1641, he, Taylor, and 
Swanston were the mainstays of the King's men. They served as 
payees for the performances at Court from April i.j, 1634, to 
March xo, 1641 (Steele, pp. i44, X49, x6x, zGj, ^74, ■lj6'). On 
several occasions during 1630-38, Lowin represented the com- 
pany in transactions with Herbert (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 38, 
44, 47, 65). Wright in Historia Histrionica (1699) tells us that 
"before the wars Lowin used to act with mighty applause Fal- 
stafF, Morose, Volpone, . . . Mammon in The Alchymist, 
Melantius in The Maid's Tragedy' ' ; that he and Taylor and Thomas 
Pollard at the outbreak of civil war "were superannuated"; that 
he played Aubrey in Rollo, or the Bloody Brother, 2Lt the Cockpit in 
1648; and "in his latter days kept an inn, the Three Pigeons at 
Brentford, where he died very old, for he was an actor of eminent 
note in the reign of King James I, and his poverty was as great 
as his age" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 405, 409, 411). In 1647 he 
joined a group of the King's players in publishing a folio edition 
of Beaumont and Fletcher; his name is appended to the dedicatory 

MI 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

epistle QVorks, i. p. x). In 1651 he and Taylor published Fletcher's 
Wildgoose Chase (Works, iv. 407) for their "private benefit." In 
their dedication "To the Honour'd Few Lovers of Drammatick 
Poesie" they quote, with a glance at their poverty, some lines 
that Walter Raleigh (Works, ii. 395) "once spake of his Amours": 

Silence in Love betrays more Wo 
Than Words, though ne'r so Wittie: 
The Beggar that is Dumb, you know, 
Deserves a Double Pittie. 

On January ^8, 1648, he and other members of the King's com- 
pany gave a bond to pay off an old Blackfriars debt to Michael 
Bowyer's heirs (Hotson, pp. 31-34). 

The date of Lowin's death is uncertain; either of two burial en- 
tries may refer to him: a "John Lewin," who left a widow 
Martha, was buried at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields on March 18, 
1659; a "John Lowen" was buried at St. Paul's, Covent Garden, 
on March 16, 1669 (Variorum, iii. iii; Collier, iii. 403). Downes 
(R^os. Ang., p. i4), writes of Betterton's performance of Shake- 
speare's Henry VIII: "The part of the King was so right and 
justly done by Mr. Betterton, he being Instructed in it by Sir 
William [Davenant], who had it from Old Mr. Lowen, that had 
his Instructions from Mr. Shakespear himself that I dare and 
will aver, none can, or will come near him in this Age, in the 
performance of that part." Lowin, Taylor, and Swanston are 
praised by Snarl, who admires nothing but the things of a former 
age, in Thomas Shadwell's The Virtuoso, acted in 1676 (Works, 
i. 3^8): 

Miranda. Methinks, though all Pleasures have left you, you 
may go to see Plays. 

Snarl. I am not such a Coxcomb, I thank God: I have seen 'em 
at Black-Fryers. Pox, they act like Poppets now, in Sadness. I, 
that have seen Joseph Taylor, and Lowen, and Swansteadl Oh, a 
brave roaring Fellow, would make the House shake again! 
Besides, I can never endure to see Plays, since Women came on 
the Stage. Boys are better by half. 

142. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

LYLYJOHN. 

John Lyly, the author of the popular novel Euphues (1578) and 
of various comedies, became lessee of the First Blackfriars in 
1583, when the Earl of Oxford bought the lease from Henry 
Evans and presented it to him. He served as payee for Court per- 
formances by Oxford's troupe on January i and March 3, 1584 
(Steele, pp. 89, 90). Later, he was Vice-Master of Paul's boys, 
wrote plays for them, and superintended their performances in 
Paul's Singing-School (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 109, 113-14). 

MACHIN, RICHARD. 

Richard Machin visited Frankfort in March, Nuremberg in 
April, 1600, Frankfort at Easter, 1601, and Frankfort for a third 
time in the autumn of the same year. During this period he was 
associated with a group of English players under the patronage 
of Maurice of Hesse. Although he was at Frankfort for Easter, 
1603, as a member of the Hessian company, he had left the Land- 
grave's service in i6ox. His appearances are recorded during 1605 
at the Frankfort Easter fair ,^ at Strassburg in May, at Frankfort 
again in the autumn, and in 1606 at Frankfort for Easter (Herz, 
pp. 38-40). 

MAGET, STEPHEN. 

Stephen Maget appears in Henslowe's accounts as tireman for 
the Admiral's men in 1596. He is possibly the Stephen who 
played a beggar in Troilus and Cressida about 1599 (H.D., ii. X95; 
H.P., p. 154). 

MAGO, WILLIAM. 

William Mago is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December xrj, 16^4, to twenty-one men"imployed by 
the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as 
Musitions and other necessary attendantes." As a King's man he 
apparently played Hanno or Asolrubal in Massinger's Believe as 
You List, licensed May 7, 1631 (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 33, 74). 

M3 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

He is probably the W. Mago appearing with W. Humlac in the 
dramatis personae to The Witch of Edmonton; and the two were 
presumably minor actors in the tragedy (Ford, Works, iii. 175). 
The play, not printed until 1658, may have passed from Prince 
Charles's men to Queen Henrietta's men about 1615, when 
the latter troupe was organized (Murray, i. 2.3 6«.)- The notice 
on the title-page assigns the play to the Prince's men, but Ezekiel 
Fenn and Theophilus Bird, both of whom are mentioned in the 
quarto, were members of the Queen's troupe and are not trace- 
able to the Prince's company. Thus Mago must have transferred 
his services at some unknown date from the King's to the Queen's 
men. 

MAIR\TN. 

Mairvin is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when his 
troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission to 
act in that town (Murray, i. Z79-8o). 

MANNER Y, SAMUEL. 

Samuel Manner}' played a bawd in Marmion's Holland's 
Leaguer, presented in December, 163 1 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45), 
by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his servants, at the 
private house in Salisbury' Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. i, 6). 

MANSELL, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

MARBECK, THOMAS. 

With the Admiral's men in 1602. Thomas Marbeck played a 
nobleman, Pontus, attendant, hostage, guard, child, and captain 
in I Tamar Cam, and a Bactrian in the Procession (H.F., p. 154). 
The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, records on June 2.6, 
1603, the baptism of Roger Marbeck, son of Thomas, "amusitian" 
(Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, igzS, p. 856). 

244 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

MARCUPP, SAMUEL. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

MARCY, CHARLES. 
See Charles Massey. 

MARRANT, EDWARD. 

Part owner of the Fortune (Warner, p. 54). 

MARSHALL, CHARLES. 

During 1615-16 Charles Marshall, Humphrey Jeffes, and Wil- 
liam Parr secured a duplicate of the 1613 patent to the Pals- 
grave's men, organized a troupe, and traveled in the provinces. 
This duplicate warrant was condemned and withdrawn by order 
of the Earl of Pembroke on July 16, 1616 (Murray, ii. 4 ff.). 

MARSTON, JOHN. 

John Marston, dramatist, acquired a share in the Second Black- 
friars organization in 1604, and became a regular pla}"wright for 
the Queen's Revels company at that house. In 1605 the Children 
offended King James by acting Eastward Hoe, a comedy written 
by Marston, Chapman, and Jonson. Marston seems to have been 
chiefly responsible for the indiscretion, and chose flight as the 
surest means of escaping the King's wrath. Probably about this 
time he sold his share in the Second Blackfriars svndicate to 
Robert Keysar, and subsequently gave up his career as a drama- 
tist for the less strenuous life of a country' parson (Adams, Rlay- 
houses, pp. XI 6-1 S). 

MARTINELLI (?), ANGELICA. 

Angelica Martinelli (?), nee Alberghini, appears to have been 
a member of a company of Italian players in England, and the 
wife of Drusiano Martinelli (^.f.). In 1580 Martinelli subscribed 
himself as "marito di Ma Angelica," who was formerly mistress 
to the Duke of Mantua's son, and, who. Chambers thinks QEliz- 

M5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Stage, ii. 2.6],'), is possibly "the nimble^ tumbling Angelica" men- 
tioned in Marston's Scourge of Villainy (1598), Satire xi. loi 
(Works, iii. 375). Professor Adams, however, suggests that 
Marston may be alluding to one of the famous apes that rode 
ponies at Paris Garden. 

MARTINELLI, DRUSIANO. 

On January 13, 1578, the Privy Council directed that "one 
Dronsiano, an Italian, a commediante and his companye" should 
be allowed to play in London (Dasent, x. 144). This "Dronsiano" 
is no doubt Drusiano Martinelli, son of Francisco Martinelli, of 
Mantua. He later became quite famous as a comedian, and in 
1595 was in the service of the Duke of Mantua. His brother 
Tristano was even more noted as Arlecchino in the commedia delV 
arte (Elix.. Stage, ii. 2.63). 

MARTON, THOMAS. 

With the Children of the Chapel Royal Thomas Marton ap- 
peared in Jonson's Poetaster, acted in 1601 (Eli^. Stage, iii. 365). 

MARTYN, WILLIAM. 

In 1572. William Martyn was the leader of a company of play- 
ers at Ipswich, as shown by the following entry in the town 
records: "Paid to William Martyne and his companye for a 
plaie at the Mote Hall, Gs. Sd." He is presumably identical with 
"Martyn the mynstrell," who visited Ipswich with his troupe 
in 1569, and received ioj. on two occasions (Hist. MSS. Comm., 
ix. I. p. X49). 

MASON. 

"Mason among the Kings players" is mentioned in Sir Thomas 
More (c. 1594), IV. i. 2.<^^. Brooke (Shak. Apoc, p. 437) explains 
the allusion by citing from Collier, i. 77, a payment on January 
6, 1515: "To the Kings Players in rewarde, £3 6s. 8d. . . . To 
John Mason wages Sd. per day." Chambers (Eliz- Stage, iv. 33) 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

calls attention to another reference in Collier, i. 45, showing 
that Alexander Mason was marshal of the royal minstrels in 1494. 
Nothing further is known of him. 

MASON, JOHN. 

As a lessee of the Whitefriars playhouse in 1608, John Mason 
held one half-share in the syndicate (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 315, 
316). His play, The Turk, was printed in 1610 "as it hath bene 
diuers times acted by the Children of his Maiesties Reuels." 
For a sketch of his life, see Adams's edition of The Turk. 

MASSE Y, CHARLES. 

Charles Massey (Massy e) first appears as an Admiral's man in 
Frederick and Basilea (1597), in which he played Tamar (H.P., p. 
153). On November 16, 1598, be bound himself to play with 
Henslowe's company, the Admiral's men at the Rose. He seems 
to have been a sharer by March 8, 1598, when he signed the ac- 
knowledgment of the company's debt. At various subsequent dates 
he is found in Henslowe's records as a borrower, as a witness, 
and as a representative of the company in its reckonings with 
Henslowe. Apparently he wrote Malcolm King of Scots for the 
Admiral's men, receiving £5 for the play on April 18, i6oz, and 
began The Siege of Dunkirk, for which he received £x in advance 
on March 7, 1603. Neither play is extant (H.D., ii. X96). Besides 
Tamar in Frederick and Basilea (1597), he also played for the Ad- 
miral's company an unspecified part in Fortune's Tennis (c. 1597- 
98), Zareo and Barcelis in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01), and 
Artaxes, an attendant, and a nobleman in i Tamar Cam (i6oi). 
In the plots of all these plays he is referred to only by his Chris- 
tian name (Greg, H.F., pp. 153, 154; R.F.S., i. isjo; Chambers, 
Eliz- Stage, ii. 175). About Christmas, 1603, the Admiral's men 
were taken into the service of Prince Henry. As a member of the 
Prince's company Massey's name occurs in the coronation list of 
March 15, 1604; in the patent of April 30, 1606; and in the house- 
hold list of 1610 (Elix_. Stage, ii. 186, 187, 188). The Prince died 

^47 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in November, i6ix, and. his troupe soon passed under the patron- 
age of the Palsgrave. Massey is named in the new patent of Jan- 
uary II, 1613 QM.S.C, i. i75). About 1613 he wrote to Edward 
Alleyn concerning a loan (H.F., p. 64). With other members of 
the Palsgrave's company he appears as lessee of the Fortune 
playhouse on October 31, 1618, and of the new Fortune on May 
xo, i6xx (H.P., pp. Tj, x8). He dined with Alleyn on March 18, 
April 15, August ix, 16x1, and on July xi, i6xx, on which last 
occasion he was accompanied by his cousin Ned Collins (Warner, 
pp. 188, 189, 19X). He is presumably the Charles Marcy or Mercy, 
described as player, gentleman, and yeoman, in the registers of 
St. Giles's, Cripplegate, from December 30, 1610, to July xo, 16x5 
(Eli^. Stage, ii. 330). He died before December 6, 1635, leaving a 
widow Elianor; and his interest in the Fortune passed, with that 
of Alleyn and others, to Edward Marrant and John Roods, as 
shown by a Chancery suit of November, 1637 (Warner, p. 54). 
On April 30, 16x4, he and others of the Palsgrave's men entered 
into a bond to Richard Gunnell, manager of the company (Hot- 
son, pp. 5X-53). 

MASSEY, GEORGE. 

A joint-lessee of the new Fortune playhouse, in which he ob- 
tained a half-share on May xo, i6xx (Warner, p. X46). 

MASS YE, CHARLES. 
See Charles Massey. 

MAXE, WILLIAM. 

A member of the Chapel Royal from 1509 to 15 11, and possibly 
longer. In 15 13 he was paid 40J-., and is described as "late a Child 
of the Chapel" (EUz_. Stage, ii. xyw.; Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii, 

M4)- 

MAXSEY, GILBERT. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no}. 

X48 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

MAY, EDWARD. 

From 1494 to 1503 Edward May belonged to Henry VII's 
Court Interluders, under the leadership of John English (Collier, 
i. 44; Eliz.. Stage, ii. 78). 

MAY, EDWARD. 

Edward May played Fidelio in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, 
presented in December, 163 1 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45), by 
"the high and mighty Prince Charles his servants, at the private 
house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. 2., 6). He is 
recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when his troupe, pre- 
sumably the King's Revels, applied for permission to act in that 
town (Murray, i. 179-80). According to the marginal notes of 
the Egerton MS. of Edmond Ironside, he acted a bailiff in the play 
(Boas, Library, 1917, viii. 133, 2.35). 

MAY, NATHAN. 

On February zrj, 1615, a license was granted to William Hovell, 
William Perry, and Nathan May, as representatives of presumably 
the King's Revels company. Nothing is heard of these players in 
London, and their only recorded provincial appearance is at Nor- 
wich on June 17, 1615. Their license was apparently condemned 
and withdrawn by an order of the Earl of Pembroke on July 16, 
1616 (Murray, ii. 10, 340, 343). 

MAY, RANDOLPH. 

Randolph May, painter, about sixty years old, of St. Leonard's, 
Shoreditch, appears as a witness in the lawsuit between Cuthbert 
Burbage and Gyles Alleyn. In his deposition of May 15, 1600, he 
says that "about eighteene yeares nowe paste" he was "A servant 
in the house Called the Theater" (Wallace, N.U.S., xiii. 140) . 
Probably he was a gatherer or a stage-attendant. 

MAYCOCKE, WILLIAM. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

2-49 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

MAYDESTON, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 142.3 (Hillebrand, Mod. 
Phil., xviii. X35). 

MAYLER, GEORGE. 

George Mayler was a Court Interluder from 152.6 to about 1540, 
and figures in two lawsuits during this period. In I5i8-i9 there 
was a dispute between him and Thomas Arthur Qq.v.'), his ap- 
prentice, and he is described as a glazier. About 1530 he appears 
as a witness in proceedings of John Rastell and Henry Walton 
concerning the use of certain theatrical apparel, and is noted as 
a merchant-tailor (Collier, i. 97, 116, 117; Chambers, Med. 
Stage, ii. 184, 187). 

MEADE, JACOB. 

Jacob Meade was Keeper of the Bears, by November 14, 1599 
(Warner, p. X34), and partner with Henslowe in the Bear Garden 
(Greg, H.D., ii. 38). In 1613 he and Henslowe signed a contract 
with the carpenter Gilbert Katherenes for the erection of the 
Hope, which was for some years used for both the performance 
of plays and the baiting of animals. Henslowe died early in Jan- 
uary, 1616, and his interest in the Hope passed to Edward Alleyn. 
On March xo, 161 6, Alleyn and Meade made an agreement with 
Prince Charles's men to continue at the Hope. Later in the same 
year the company left the playhouse as the result of a disagree- 
ment with Meade, after which the building seems to have been 
used only for baiting. There followed a dispute between Alleyn 
and Meade, which was not settled until September xz, 161 9 
(Greg, H.D., ii. 66-68). Meade was buried at St. Saviour's, 
Southwark, on July 9, 16x4 QEliz- Stage, ii. 330). 

MELYONEK, JOHN. 

Probably Master of the Chapel Royal during 1483-85 (Elix.- 
Stage, ii. X7). 

150 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

MERCY, CHARLES. 

See Charles Massey. 

MERETT, HENRY. 
See Henry Meryell. 

MERYELL, HENRY. 

Henry Meryell (or Merett) was a member of the Chapel Royal 
in 1509 and 1511 (Hillebrand, Mod. Phil., xviii. 2.44; Chambers, 
EliZ- Stage, ii. xrjn?). 

MICHAEL. 

See Mighel. 

MIGHEL. 

The stage-directions of Sir John van Olden Barnavelt (ed. Frij- 
linck, p. clx), acted by the King's men in 1619, assign the parts 
of a huntsman and of a captain to one Mighel or Michael. This 
may have been his first name. 

MILLES, TOBIAS. 
See Tobias Mils. 

MILS, TOBIAS. 

Tobias Mils (or Mylles) was a member of Queen Elizabeth's 
company in 1583, as shown by a London record that gives the 
personnel of the troupe at this date (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 106). Hey- 
wood mentioned him with others as having flourished before his 
time, i.e. before about 1594 (Apology, p. 43). He was buried as 
"one of the Queenes Maiesties players" at St. Olave's, South- 
w^ark, on July 11, 1585, where his sons, William and Toby, were 
baptized on January 3, 1584, and September 5, 1585, respectively 
(Elix,. Stage, ii. 330). He may or may not be identical with "one 
Myles," a player, mentioned in A Booke of the Nature and Properties, 
as well as the Bathes in England, as of other Bathes in Germany e (1557): 
' 'for they [the waters of Bath] drye up wounderfully, and heale 

^51 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the goute excellentlye (and that in a short tyme), as with diverse 
other, one Myles, one of my Lord Summerset tes players, can 
beare witnesse" (Collier, i. 139). The Duke of Somerset was be- 
headed on January ix, i55x. Robert Cecil's secretary was named 
Milles, and had a son Tobias buried at Chelsea on April 9, 1599 
QEliz- Stage, ii. 330). 

MINION, SAMUEL. 

Samuel Minion is named in a license of November x8, 1634, 
granted to a company under the leadership of William Daniel, 
and known as the King's Revels (Murray, ii. 8 fiF.). 

MISTALE. 

Mistale is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when his 
troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission to 
act in that town (Murray, i. X79-8o). 

MOHUN, MICHAEL. 

Wright tells us in Historia Histrionica (1699) that Michael 
Mohun (or Moone) "was a boy . . . under Beeston at the 
Cockpit," where he acted Bellamente in Love's Cruelty, "which 
part he retained after the Restoration" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 
404, 409). On May ix, 1637, he and other members of William 
Beeston 's company were summoned before the Privy Council for 
playing during plague quarantine (M.S.C., i. 39X). At the closing 
of the playhouses in 164X and the beginning of the Civil War, 
he enlisted in the King's army. He "was a captain, and (after 
the wars were ended here) served in Flanders, where he received 
pay as a major." His career at the Cockpit was continued after 
the Restoration. He is named in. the Petition of the Cockpit 
Players on October 13, 1660, and the Articles of Agreement be- 
tween Herbert and Killigrew on June 4, i66x (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, pp. 94, 1 13-14). His Majesty's Company of Comedians 
opened their new playhouse, the Theatre Royal, on May 7, 1663 
(Pepys, Diary, iii. 107), under the management of Thomas Killi- 

X5X 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

grew. As a member of the organization Mohun played the follow- 
ing parts (Downes, Ros. Ang., pp. x ff.): Leontius in The Humorous 
Lieutenant; Don Leon in Rule a Wife and have a Wife; Volpone in 
The Fox; Truewit in The Silent Woman; Face in The Alchemist; 
Melantius in The Maid's Tragedy; Mardonius in King and no King; 
Aubrey in Rollo, Duke of Normandy; lago in The Moor of Venice; 
Philocles in The Maiden Queen; Belamy in The Mock Astrologer; 
Cassius in Julius Caesar; the Emperor in The Indian Emperor; 
Maximin in Tyrannick Love; the old Emperor in Aureng Zeb; 
Clytus in Alexander the Great; Ventidius in All for Love, or the World 
Well Lost; the Duke of Mantua in The Assignation, or Love in a 
Nunnery; Mythridates in Mythridates , King of Pontus; Matthias in 
The Destruction of Jerusalem; Rhodophil in Marriage Alamode; 
Lord Burleigh in The Unhappy Favorite, or the Earl of Essex; King 
Edward III in The Black Prince; Abdemelech in The Conquest of 
Granada; and Hannibal, in Sophonisba, or Hannibal's Overthrow. 
Downes (Ros. Ang., p. 17) says that "he was Eminent for Vol- 
pone; Face in The Alchymst; Melantius in The Maids Tragedy; 
Mardonius in King and no King; Cassius in Julius Caesar; Clytus in 
Alexander; Mithridates, &c. An Eminent Poet [Nathaniel Lee] 
seeing him Act this last, vented suddenly this Saying: 'Oh Mohun, 
Mohun! Thou little Man of Mettle, if I should Write a 100 Plays, 
I'd Write a Part for thy Mouth'; in short, in all his Parts, he was 
most Accurate and Correct." Pepys gives three notices of him: 
On November xo, 1660, he saw Beaumont and Fletcher's Beggar's 
Bush, and for "the first time one Moone, who is said to be the 
best actor in the world, lately come over with the King"; on 
November 2.2., 1660: "Mr. Moon did act the Traitor very well," 
in Shirley's play of that title; and on February 6, 1669, he was 
disappointed on seeing Othello "but ill acted in most parts; 
Mohun, which did a little surprise me, not acting lago's part by 
much so well as Clun used to do" (Diary, i. 2.6j, xyo; viii. zoy). 
In The Tattler, Number 99, November z6, 1709, Richard Steele 
writes of his "old friends, Hart and Mohun, the one by his nat- 

2-53 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ural and proper force, the other by his great skill and art, never 
failed to send me home full of such ideas as affected my be- 
haviour, and made me insensibly more courteous and humane to 
my friends and acquaintances" (Chalmers, British Essayists, ii. 
367). After the union of the Duke's and the King's companies in 
i68x, Mohun appears never to have acted again. He soon found 
it necessary to ask the King to help him in getting a sufficient 
pension from the united company, and his petition is interesting 
for its autobiographic quality (Nicoll, Rest. Drama, pp. 3i7-x8). 
He died in October, 1684, and was buried in the church of St. 
Giles-in-the-Fields (Pepys, Diary, vi. X58«.; D.N.B., xxxviii. 
no). 

MONKE, WILLIAM. 

Samuel Monke, son of William, "a musitian," was baptized at 
St. Saviour's, Southwark, on June 10, i6i9(Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 
15, 19x8, p. 856). 

MOON, PETER. 

In i56x Peter Moon was the leader of a company of players at 
Ipswich, as shown by an entry in the town records: "Item, to the 
plaiers Peter Moone and his companie, 5j'." (Hist. MSS. Comm., 
ix. I. p. X48). 

MOONE, MICHAEL. 

See Michael Mohun. 

MOORE, JOSEPH. 

Joseph Moore and John Townsend are named in a license of 
April rrj, 1611, as leaders of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe QA.S.C, 
i. X74). On August t.<^, 1611, he and his fellow-actors gave Hens- 
lowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" of agreement 
CH.P., pp. 18, in). He no doubt continued with the company, 
for on March xo, 161 8, a new license mentions him as one of the 
leaders. From this date to 1631 he appears to have been active in 

2-54 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the management of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe, especially on 
provincial tours. On July i6, 1616, the Earl of Pembroke issued 
an order for the suppression of certain theatrical organizations, 
and Moore brought this document to Norwich on June 4, 1617. 
On July II, 1617, Townsend and Moore were paid £30 for three 
plays performed before King James on his journey to Scotland 
during the preceding March or April (Steele, p. 198). He was 
leader of the company at Norwich on February 8, 161 9 (?);butat 
the next visit on April 2.7., 162.0, Francis Wambus told the town 
authorities that although Moore was still a member of the 
troupe, he had not played during the past year, and that he was 
then keeping an inn at Chichester. He is named in a patent of 
March xo, 162.2.; in a bill of March 13, 162.x, signed by the Lord 
Chamberlain; in the 162.1 Herbert list of "the chiefe of them at 
the Phoenix" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63); in a warrant of June 
30, 161.8, appointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of 
Bohemia's) players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 94); and in a license of December 9, i6x8. He also appears 
in later provincial records of visits of the company: Reading, 
December 14, 16x9; Norwich, March 3, 1630; Coventry, June, 
1630, and March 30, 1631; and Reading, August 13, 1631. By 
December 7, 1631, he had joined Prince Charles's men, as shown 
by the company's license of that date. Since his name does not 
appear in the cast of Marmion's Holland's Leaguer (December, 
1631), he possibly came to the Prince's men as manager. He was 
no doubt admirably fitted for such a position, for he had directed 
during many years the affairs of the Lady Elizabeth's players. 
The Norwich annals mention him on November 3, 1635, and 
February xi, 1638 He served as payee for Court performances on 
December 10, 1635, March xi, 1638, and May 4, 1640 (Steele, 
pp. 150, x68, X75). In 16x3 he lived "att the Harowe in Barbican" 
(Murray, i. 19X, xi8, xxx, X43, X5X, X54, X55, X59, x6o; ii. X51, 
340. 343. 344. 345. 346, 353. 358. 386, 387; Wallace, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 347; Adams, Playhouses, pp. 375-78). 

X55 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

MORE, GEORGE. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

MORE, ROGER. 

Roger More was in 1640 a hired man of Prince Charles's com- 
pany. In an order of April Z5, 1640, he is named as a Prince's man 
who is not "to be hindered or diverted in his service by being 
impressed, arrested, or otherwise molested, without leave first 
asked" (Stoipcs, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). 

MORGAN, FLUELLEN. 

Fluellen Morgan is mentioned in the examination of Richard 
Bradshaw's players who got into trouble at Banbury in 1633, 
when the town authorities became suspicious of the validity of 
the company's license (Murray, ii. 106 ff., 163 ff.). From the 
records it appears that Edward Whiting (^.v.) either had been 
or was in some way connected with Bradshaw's troupe, that he 
"let the commission in question to William Cooke and Fluellen 
Morgan, and they two went with it with a puppet-play until 
they had spent all, then they pawned the commission for 4^." 
Subsequently Bradshaw redeemed and bought the commission. 

MORLEY, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. in). 

MORRIS, MATHIAS. 

Mathias Morris played Sylana, wife to Silius, in Richards's 
Messallina, the Roman Empress, printed in 1640 as "acted with 
generall applause divers times by the Company of his Majesties 
Revells." 

MOTTERAM, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal about 1600-01. In Henry Clif- 
ton's complaint to the Star Chamber on December 15, 1601, as to 

^6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

how boys were pressed for the Chapel at Blackfriars, John Mot- 
teram is named as one so taken, and is described as "a gramer 
scholler in the free schole at Westminster" (Wallace, Black- 
friars, p. 80). 

MOUNFELD, JOHN. 

John Mounfeld and three of his fellows who had been players 
to Queen Jane before her death in 1537 are mentioned about 1538 
in a Chancery suit concerning the payments for a horse hired "to 
beare there playing garments" (Stopes, Shak. Envir., p. 136). 

MUFFORD, JOHN. 

On June 10, 1590, John Mufford, "one of the Lord Beauchamps 
players," was committed to prison for disobeying the order of 
the mayor of Norwich that he should not play in that town 
(Murray, ii. Z5, 337). 

MULCASTER, RICHARD. 

Headmaster of the Merchant Taylors' School, 1561-86, and of 
St. Paul's Grammar School, 1596-1608 QD.N.B., xxxix. xj'^; 
Eliz.. Stage, ii. 19, 75 ff.}. 

MUNDAY, ANTHONY. 

Anthony Munday, dramatist, was a player before 1581, ac- 
cording to an anonymous pamphlet, A True Report of . . . M. 
Campion (i58i), where it is said that he "first was a stage player" 
and "did play extempore, those gentlemen and others whiche 
were present, can best giue witnes of his dexterity, who being 
wery of his folly, hissed him from his stage. Then being thereby 
discouraged, he set forth a balet against playes, but yet (o con- 
stant youth) he now beginnes againe to ruffle upon the stage." 
In all probability he was a member of the troupe of players 
under the patronage of the Earl of Oxford, whose "servant" 
he calls himself in his View of Sundry Examples, 1580 (^D.N.B., 
xxxix. i9o; EliZ- Stage, iii. 444). 

2.57 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

MYLDEVALE, THOMAS. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 14x3 (Hillebrand, Mod. 
Phil., xviii. X35). 

MYLLES, TOBIAS. 
See Tobias Mils. 

NASION. 

See Henry Nation. 

NATION, HENRY. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). He is perhaps identical with Nasion, a legatee 
in the will of Sebastian Westcott, dated April 3, 1581, where he 
is named among the "sometimes children of the said almenerey," 
i.e. St. Paul's (Elix.. Sta^e, ii. i5«.). 

NAVARRO, JOHN. 

The leader of a company of Spanish actors in London, as shown 
by a warrant of December ^3, 1635, "to pay £10 to John Navarro 
for himself and his company of Spanish players for a play before 
the King" (Steele, p. 2.53). 

NED. 

A clown mentioned in Nashe's Summer s Last Will and Testament 
(Works, iii. 2.33), acted in i59x at Croydon, possibly by members 
of Archbishop Whitgift's household (Elix,. Stage, iii. 451-53). 
In the Prologue (line 8), Will Summers says that the play can 
proceed "if my cousin Ned will lend me his Chayne and his 
Fiddle." Summers later refers to him as "Ned foole" (Nashe, 
Works, iii. X58, x69): "I haue had a dogge my selfe, that would 
dreame, and talke in his sleep, turne round like Ned foole, and 
sleepe all night in a porridge pot" (line 783); "Ned fooies clothes 
are so perfumde with the beere he powrd on me, that there shall 
not be a Dutchman within xo. mile, but he'le smel out & claime 
kindred of him" (line 112.0). 

X58 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

NED. 

In the plot of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, presented by Strange' s men 
about 1590, Ned is cast for the part of Rhodope (?) in "Sloth" 
(Greg, H.P., p. i5x; R.E.S., i. x6i). 

NETHE, JOHN. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

NETHERSALL, JOHN. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

NEWARK, WILLIAM. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1493-1509 (Wallace, Evolution, 
pp. x6ff., 33). 

NEWMAN, JOHN. 

A lessee, with William Hunnis, of the First Blackfriars play- 
house, 1581-83. In 1583 Hunnis and Newman transferred their 
lease to Henry Evans (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 107-08). 

NEWTON, JOHN. 

John Newton was a member of Prince Charles's troupe from 
1 610 to 16x5. As a Prince's man he appears in the patent of March 
30, 1610; in a warrant of March 19, 1615, to come before the 
Privy Council for playing during Lent (M.S.C., i. xyz, 37x); in 
an agreement with Alleyn and Meade on March 1.0, 161 6 (Warner, 
p. 50); early in 1619 as A Fasting-Day in Middleton's Masque of 
Heroes (Works, vii. xoo); and in King James's funeral procession 
on May 7, 16x5 (Murray, i. 161, X37). 

NICHOLAS. 

Apparently the name of the "Singing-boy" in Jonson's Staple 
of News, acted by the King's men in 162.6 (Works, v. 160, ^56). 

X59 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

In the dramatis fersonae we find: "Fiddlers, Singing-boy, Attend- 
ants, &c." A stage-direction, IV. i, reads: "Enter the Fidlers, 
and Nicholas." Then a character says: "Nick the boy shall sing 
it." Later, "Nich" sings: "As bright, &c." He is probably to be 
identified with the Nick who seems to have assumed two or 
three parts in Massinger's Believe as You List (ed. Croker, pp. i6, 
49, 86), licensed for the King's men on May 7, 163 1 (Adams, 
Dram. Rec, p. 33). 

NICK. 

Nick played a lady in "Envy," and probably Pompeia in 
"Sloth," of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, acted by Strange's men about 
1590 (Greg, H.P., p. i5z; R.E.S., i. x6x). A Nicke also appears 
in the 16x3 folio text of The Taming of the Shrew, III. i. 8i, where 
he speaks three lines that follow the stage-direction: "Enter a 
Servant." The Admiral's men on December X5, 1601, bought hose 
for Nycke to tumble in before Queen Elizabeth (H.D., i. i5x). 
A Nicke is mentioned in a letter from Joan Alleyn to her husband 
on October xi, 1603 (Warner, p. 15). He has been conjectured to 
be identical with Nicholas Tooley Cq.v.^. 

NICOLL, BASILIUS. 

Basilius Nicoll, a scrivener, apparently controlled Thomas 
Bromley's interest in the Globe playhouse. Bromley was a minor 
(Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 4 fF.). 

NILL, JOHN. 

A player, whose daughter Alice was baptized at St. Saviour's 
on August 13, 1601 QEliz. Stage, ii. 331). 

NORWOOD, JOHN. 

John Norwood belonged to the Children of Paul's in 1598 
(Hillebrand, Child Actors, p. iii). Apparently he was the per- 
former of Lucio mentioned in a stage-direction of Marston's 

z6o 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

I Antonio and Mellida, IV. i. X9, presented by Paul's boys about 
1599 (Works, i. 63): "Enter Andrugio, Lucio, Cole, and Nor- 
wood." 

NYCKE. 
See Nick. 

NYCOWLLES, ROBERT. 

A player, who witnessed a loan from Philip to Francis Hen- 
slowe on June i, 1595 (H.D., i. 6). 

OFFLEY, THOMAS. 

At an uncertain date, Thomas Offley, subsequently Lord Mayor 
of London, was a member of the Children of Paul's. Joseph 
Hunter, in Chorus Vatum, quotes from a biographical sketch: 
"This Thomas Offley became a good grammarian under Mr. 
[William] Lillie and understood the Latin tongue perfectly; and 
because he had a sweet voice he was put to learn prick-song 
among the choristers of St. Paul's, for that learned Mr. Lillie 
knew full well that knowledge in music was a help and a further- 
ance to all arts" (Eli^. Stage, ii. i6«.; D.N.B., xlii. 5). William 
Lyly was Headmaster of St. Paul's Grammar School from about 
1509 to I5XX. 

OSTLER, WILLIAM. 

William Ostler first appears with the Children of the Chapel 
Royal in Jonson's Poetaster, acted in 1601 (£//!^. Stage, iii. 365). 
Subsequently, with Field and Underwood, he was "taken to 
strengthen the Kings service" (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, 
i. 317). He had passed to the King's men by 1610, when he is 
found in the actor-list of Jonson's Alchemist. With this company 
he also acted in the following plays (Murray, i. opp. lyx): 
Catiline (1611); The Duchess of Malfi (c. 1611), Antonio, which 
character was later played by Robert Benfield; The Captain (c. 
i6iz); Valentinian (1611-14); and Bonduca (1613-14). He is named 
in the 16^3 folio list of Shakespearean players. In 1 611 he married 

x6i 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Thomasine, daughter of John Heminges. Their son Beaumont was 
baptized at St. Mary's, Aldermanbury, on May i8, 1612. (Collier, 
iii. 4213). He died on December 16, 1614. That he won consider- 
able fame is indicated by an epigram by John Davies, printed 
about 1 61 1 in The Scourge of Folly (ed. Grosart, ii. 31): 

To the Roscius of these times Mr. W. Ostler 

Ostler thou tookst a knock thou would'st haue giu'n, 

Neere sent thee to thy latest home; but O! 

Where was thine action w^hen thy crowne w^as riu'n 

Sole king of actors; then wast idle? No: 

Thou hadst it for thou wouldst bee doing; thus 

Good actors' deeds are oft most dangerous: 

But if thou plaist thy dying part as well 

As thy stage-parts thou hast no part in hell. 

The shares he had acquired in the Blackfriars playhouse. May xo, 
1 61 1, and in the Globe, February zo, i6ix, were soon involved 
in a lawsuit between his widow and Heminges (Wallace, London 
Times, October x and 4, 1909). 

OTTEWELL, GEORGE. 

See George Attewell. 

OTTEWELL, HUGH. 
See Hugh Attwell. 

OTWELL, GEORGE. 
See George Attewell. 

PAGE, JOHN. 

With Queen Henrietta's company (Murray, i. opp. x66), John 
Page acted Jane, Justice Lanby's daughter, in Shirley's Wedding 
(c. i6x6), and Lelius, in Nabbes's Hannibal and Scipio (1635). 

PAGE, OLIVER. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

x6z 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PALLANT, ROBERT. 

In the plot of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, acted by Strange's company 
about 1590, Robert Pallant is cast for several parts: a warder in 
the Induction; an attendant, a soldier, and Dardan in "Envy"; 
Nicanor in "Sloth"; and Julio (?), in "Lechery" (Greg, H.P., 
p. i5x; R.E.S., i. i6i). By November x6, 1602., he belonged to 
Worcester's men, when he authorized payment on behalf of the 
company. This is the only mention of him in Henslowe's Diary 
(Greg, H.D., ii. 300). Early in the reign of James I Worcester's 
men became Queen Anne's company. As a Queen's man Pallant 
is named in the list of players who took part in the coronation 
procession of March 15, 1604; i^ ^^^ patent of April 15, 1609, 
where an obvious clerical error gives his name as "Richard"; 
and in the duplicate license issued on January 7, i6ii, to the 
.traveling company QEliz- Stage, ii. ^19; M..S.C., i. rrjo; Murray, 
ii. 343). In i6ix Heywood published his Apology for Actors, to 
which Pallant contributed commendatory verses: 

To my good friend and fellow, Thomas Heywood 

Have I not knowne a man, that to be hyr'd 
Would not for any treasure see a play, 
Reele from a taverne? Shall this be admir'd. 
When as another, but t'other day, 
That held to weare a surplesse most unmeet, 
Yet after stood at Paul's-crosse in a sheet. 

Robert Pallant. 

Subsequently he was temporarily associated with the Lady 
Elizabeth's troupe. He is mentioned as joining the Lady Eliza- 
beth's men in June, 1614, and a letter from Daborne to Henslowe 
seems to indicate that he was negotiating with the company as 
early as March x8, when he was "much discontented" with 
Henslowe's "neglect of him" (H.P., pp. 8x, 88). By March xo, 
1 61 6, he had transferred his services to Prince Charles's men, 
entering into an agreement between this company and Alleyn 
and Meade (Warner, p. 50). His career is quite involved, but 

163 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

through it all he seems to have continued technically a servant 
to the Queen; he attended her funeral in this capacity on May 13, 
1619. He may have been with the Queen's men at Norwich on 
May 6, 1615, and May 31, 1617, for his name is given in the ab- 
stracts of the license in the town records (Murray, i. 196; ii. 
340, 343). He was a visitor at Henslowe's death-bed on January 
6, 1616 QH.D., ii. x6). The register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, 
records the baptism of children of the player: Robert, September 
z8, 1605; John, August X4, 1608; Ephraim, January i, 1611, 
buried October 19, 1611; Hanburye, July 3, 1614, buried July 4, 
1614; and the burial on September 4, 1619, of "Robert Pallant, a 
man, in the church" (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). 
This burial entry probably refers to the player; but see Robert 
Pallant, "the younger." 

PALLANT, ROBERT, "THE YOUNGER." 

Chambers (£/i^. Stage, ii. 331) suggests that the R. Pallant 
who played the part of Cariola (a waiting-woman, and thus a 
minor part) in Webster's Duchess of Malfi was not the old actor 
of the same name, but one of a younger generation. The play was 
given by the King's men, and the actor-list is reasonably dated 
i6i9-x3 (Murray, i. opp. lyx; ii. 146-48). Chambers's suggestion 
seems plausible when we consider that a Robert Pallant is named 
in a Protection from Arrest issued by Herbert on December zj, 
16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by the Kinges Maiesties 
servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as Musitions and other 
necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 74). It does not 
seem likely that the "elder" Robert Pallant, an experienced actor 
and a veteran of the stage, first mentioned about 1590, would 
have been a mere stage-attendant or musician in 16x4. The avail- 
able evidence seems to favor the conjecture that the Robert 
Pallant with the King's men was of a younger generation, and 
that the "elder" player died in 1619. More recent research by 
G. E. Bentley CT.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856) corroborates 

X64 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Chambers's view that a "younger" Pallant appeared as Cariola in 
The Duchess of Malfi. He is quite probably the Robert Pallant, son 
of the "elder" player, whose baptism is recorded in the register 
of St. Saviour's, Southwark on September x8, 1605. 

PANT, THOMAS. 

Thomas Pant, apprentice to Christopher Simpson of Egton, 
shoemaker and recusant, appears to have been a strolling player 
from 1607 to 1 610. At Topcliffe, Yorkshire, on October x, 1610, 
he was released from his indentures on complaining that he had 
been "trayned up for these three yeres in wandering in the 
country and playing of interludes" (^Elix.- Stage, i. 304«.) 

PARKINS. 

See John Perkin. 

PARLOWE, RICHARD. 

See Richard Parrowe. 

PARR, WILLIAM. 

With the Admiral's. men in 1602. William Parr was cast for 
several minor parts in the plot of / Tamar Cam: a nobleman, a 
scout, an attendant, a trumpet, a guard, and a Bohar in the Pro- 
cession (H.P., p. 154). About Christmas, 1603, the Admiral's 
men were taken into the service of Prince Henry. Although Parr 
is not named in the patent of April 30, 1606, he apparently con- 
tinued with the company after the transfer, for in 1610 he ap- 
pears in a household list of the Prince's men (EUz,. Stage, ii. 188). 
The Prince died in November, i6ii, and his troupe soon passed 
under the patronage of the Palsgrave. Parr is mentioned in the 
new patent of January 11, 1613 (M.S.C., i. 2.75), and in the lease 
of the Fortune by the Palsgrave's men on October 31, 1618 (H.P., 
p. Tj). He dined with Edward Alleyn on March xi, 1618 (Warner, 
p. 169). During 1615-16 Charles Marshall, Humphrey JefFes, and 
Parr secured a duplicate of the 1613 patent to the Palsgrave's 

^65 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

company, organized a troupe, and traveled in the provinces. 
This duplicate warrant w^as condemned and withdrawn by order 
of the Earl of Pembroke on July i6, 1616 (Murray, ii. 4 fF.)- He 
is last heard of as a Palsgrave's man on April 9, 162.0, when 
certain members of the company dined with Alleyn (Warner, 
p. 184). 

PARROWE, RICHARD. 

Richard Parrowe (or Parlowe) was a member of Henry VIII's 
troupe of Court Intcrluders from 1538 to 1545 (£/i^. Stage, ii. 
79«.; Collier, i. 117). 

PARSELEY, RICHARD. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

PARSONS, THOMAS. 

Thomas Parson's, Thomas Downton's boy, fetched money on 
behalf of the Admiral's men from Henslowe for properties on (?) 
April 16, 1599 (H.D., ii. 301). With the Admiral's company he 
acted in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01), appearing as a Fury, 
and in / Tamar Cam (i6ox), assuming the parts of an attendant, 
a Persian, a guard, a spirit, a messenger, a nurse, and an Her- 
maphrodite in the procession QH.P., pp. 153, 154; Eliz- Stage, ii. 

175-76)- 

PATESON, WILLIAM. 

On March 6, 1584, William Pateson, "my lord Harbards man," 
belonged to the Earl of Worcester's players, and was engaged in 
a dispute between the players and the authorities at Leicester. 
Lord Herbert was Worcester's son (Eli^. Stage, ii. zi3, iX4«.). 

PATRICK, RICHARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. iix). 

i66 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PATTMIEC?), EDWARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

PATTRICK, WILLIAM. 

William Pattrick is known as a minor actor with the King's 
men from 16x4 to 1636. His name occurs in a Protection from 
Arrest issued by Herbert on December 17, 162.4, to twenty-one 
men "imployed by the Kinges Maiesties serv antes in theire 
quallity of Playinge as Musitions and other necessary atten- 
dantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec.,p. 74);in the actor-list of Massinger's 
Roman Actor (licensed October 11, 16x6), as Palphurius Sura, a 
senator; in the marginal notes to Massinger's Believe as You List 
(licensed May 7, 163 1), as a captain and probably as Demetrius; 
in a Ticket of Privilege granted on January ix, 1636, to the at- 
tendants "employed by his Majesty's servants the players of the 
Blackfriars, and of special use to them both on the Stage and 
otherwise for his Majesty's disport and service"; and in the 
"Players Pass" on May 17, 1636. In 16x3 he lived "on the Bancke- 
syde neare the Bargehouse" (Murray, i. opp. 17X; Wallace, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347; Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99}. Margaret Pattrick, 
daughter of William, "a player," was baptized on June xo, i6xx, 
at St. Saviour's, Southwark (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, 
p. 856). 

PAVY, SALATHIEL. 

Salathiel (or Salmon) Pavy belonged to the Chapel Royal 
from about 1600 to about 1603, and became one of its most famous 
children. In Henry Clifton's complaint to the Star Chamber on 
December 15, 1601, as to how boys were pressed for the Chapel 
at Blackfriars, Pavy is named as one so taken, and is described as 
"apprentice to one Peerce" (Wallace, Blackfriars, p. 80). His em- 
ployer, "one Peerce," has been identified with Edward Pearce, 
Master of the Children of Paul's; but there seems to be no likeli- 

X67 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

hood that the managers of Blackfriars would have committed 
the imprudent act of taking one of Paul's boys. He is known to 
have acted in two of Jonson's plays, Cynthia's Revels and The 
Poetaster, presented by the Children of the Chapel in 1600 and 
1601 respectively (Elii. Stage, iii. 363, 365). Jonson in his Epi- 
grams (1616), cxx (Works, viii. xxi), gives eloquent testimony to 
Salathiel's power to portray the character of old men, although he 
was "scarce thirteen" when he died after three years of playing: 

An Epitaph on Salathiel Pavy, a child of 
Queen Elizabeth's chapel 

Weep with me, all you that read 

This little story: 
And know, for whom a tear you shed 

Death's self is sorry. 
'Twas a child that so did thrive 

In grace and feature 
As heaven and nature seem'd to strive 

Which own'd the creature. 
Years he number'd scarce thirteen 

When fates turn'd cruel, 
Yet three fill'd zodiacs had he been 

The stage's jewel; 
And did act, what now we moan. 

Old men so duly. 
As, sooth, the Parcae thought him one, 

He play'd so truly. 
So, by error to his fate 

They all consented; 
But viewing him since, alas, too late! 

They have repented; 
And have sought, to give new birth. 

In baths to steep him; 
But being so much too good for earth, 

Heaven vows to keep him. 

PAVYE, WILLIAM. 

With the Admiral's company one Pavy acted Boniface(?) in 
Fortune's Tennis, about 1597-98 (Greg, H.P., p. 154; R.E.S., i. 

2.68 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

2.y6). He may fairly be identified with the William Pavye whose 
burial is recorded on September 8, 1608, in the register of St. 
Bodolph Aldgate, where he is described as "one of ye princes 
players dwelling by the Mynoryes" (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 
103). This identification is quite plausible, for about Christmas, 
1603, the Admiral's men were taken into the service of Prince 
Henry. He was apparently only a minor actor, which would ac- 
count for the non-appearance of his name in the patent granted 
to the Prince's men on April 30, 1606. "Mres Pavie," presumably 
the player's widow, is mentioned in a letter from Charles Massey 
to Edward Alleyn, about 1613 CH.P., p. 64). 

PAYNE, ROBERT. 

A patentee for the Children of the Queen's Revels at the Second 
Blackfriars, on February 4, 1604 (Adams, Playhouses, p. xi5). 

PEACOCKE, ROBERT. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

PEADLE, ABRAHAM. 
See Abraham Pedel. 

PEADLE, WILLIAM. 
See William Pedel. 

PEARCE, EDWARD. 

Edward Pearce (Piers, Peers), who had been a Gentleman of 
the Chapel since 1598, resigned his place in 1600 upon his ap- 
pointment to the Mastership of the Children of Paul's, which 
apparently he held until about 1609 (Rimbault, Old Cheque Book, 
pp. 4, 5 fF.; Adams, Playhouses, p. 117). For his connection with 
the lawsuit concerning Chapman's The Old Joiner of Aldgate in 
1603, see Charles Sisson, "Keep The Widow Waking," The Library, 
N.S. (192.7), viii. 41. 

x69 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PEDEL, ABRAHAM. 

During 1 614-15 Abraham Pedel was in Germany with a group 
of English players in the service of John Sigismund, Elector of 
Brandenburg (Cohn, p. Ixxxviii). Apparently he is the Abraham 
Peadle who visited Norwich on June 17, 1616, and June 14, 162.0, 
with a company licensed to do "dancinge on the Roape and other 
feats of activity" (Murray, ii. 341, 346). By 16x3 he had become 
an actor at the Fortune, and lived at "George Alley in Gouldinge 
lane." With Richard Claytone, Richard Grace, and William 
Stratford, "all Actors at the fortune neere Golding lane," he 
was summoned to appear at court to answer a bill of complaint 
made by Gervase Markham (Wallace, Jahrbucb, xlvi. 348, 350). 
Since in 16x3 the Fortune playhouse was occupied by the Pals- 
grave's m?n, Pedel, it may be reasonably assumed, belonged to 
that company. 

PEDEL, JACOB. 

In 1597 Jacob Pedel (Behel or Biel) was in Germany, visiting 
Strassburg and Frankfort with a company under the leadership 
of Thomas Sackville (Herz, pp. 34 ff.). During 1614-15 he is 
again recorded on the Continent, with a troupe of English actors 
patronized by John Sigismund, Elector of Brandenburg (Cohn, p. 
Ixxxviii). 

PEDEL, WILLIAM. 

William Pedel first appears as an English pantomimist in Hol- 
land. On November 18, 1608, he was allowed by the Council of 
Leyden "to exhibit various beautiful and chaste performances 
with his body, without using any words" (Cohn, p. Ixxxiii). 
The Continental records again give his name during 1 614-15, 
when he belonged to the players with John Sigismund, Elector 
of Brandenburg (Cohn, p. Ixxxviii). By June 17, 1616, he had 
returned to England, where he continued his profession of 
"dauncing & vaulting" with "other feats of activity," and is 
found in provincial records as late as December Z4, 1639 (Murray, 

170 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

a. 148, 153, 34i, 346). This last notice, however, may refer to a 
younger William Peadle mentioned with his father in 161.0. The 
family traditions seem to have been maintained by the younger 
Peadle, who is presumably alluded to in Mercurius Fumigosus, 1654 
(Rollins, Sfud. in PbiL, xviii. 315): "The lately desceased Mont- 
ford, Peadle, and now Christ. Whitehead, who for agility of 
body, and neatness in Dancing," 

Doth in best iudgements, as farr exceed the Turks, 
As Shakspere Haywood in his Commick Works. 

The registers of St. Saviour's, Southwark, record in 1610, 1617, 
and 16x9, children of a William Peadle, described as "tumbler" 
and "gentleman" (Eli^. Stage, ii. 33x). 

PEERS, EDWARD. 
See Edward Pearce. 

PEERS, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. iiz). 

PENDRY, CHARLES. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

PENN, WILLIAM. 

As a member of the Children of the Queen's Revels company, 
William Penn appears in the actor-list of Jonson's Epicoene, 
which, according to the folio of 1616, was "Acted in the yeere 
1609, by the Children of her Maiesties Revells." By March zo, 
1616, he belonged to Prince Charles's men, joining his fellows in 
signing an agreement with Alleyn and Meade (H.P., p. 90). On 
May 7, 16x5, he took part in King James's funeral procession 
(Murray, i. 161, 2.37). Soon after his accession, Charles I took his 
father's players under his patronage, and several members of 
the old Prince Charles's company were no doubt transferred to 

171 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the King's men. William Rowley is the only one of the Prince's 
troupe mentioned in the King's men's license of June Z4, 162.5; 
but Penn and Anthony Smith, both former Prince's men, appear 
in the cast of Ford's Lover's Melancholy, licensed for the King's 
troupe on November X4, i6x8. The omission of their names from 
the 16x5 patent is not explained, but conceivably their transfer 
occurred about this time. As a King's man Penn appears in the 
livery allowance of May 6, 1619; as Julio Baptista, a great 
scholar, in Massinger's Picture (licensed June 8, 16x9); in the 
marginal notes to Massinger's Believe as You List (licensed May 
7, 1 631), where he is assigned the parts of a merchant and a 
jailor; as Nantolet in Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase (a revival, 163 1); 
and in the "Players Pass" of May 17, 1636 (Murray, i. opp. 172.)- 
The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate record his marriage to Sibill 
West on June 30, 1616; he was then of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch. 
Their children, Marie and William, were baptized November xi, 
1617, and March 31, 1619, respectively; in 1617 he was of Hounds- 
ditch (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 104). In 16x3 he lived "at the 
George Alley in Gouldinge lane" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi 347), 
and in 1636 children of his were baptized and buried at the parish 
of St. Giles, Cripplegate (Eli^. Stage, ii. 3Zi). 

PENNYCUICKE, ANDREW. 

Andrew Penny cuicke published in 1655 Robert Davenport's 
King John and Matilda (Davenport, Works, p. 4), which had been 
presented by Queen Henrietta's men, probably about 162.9 (Mur- 
ray, i. opp. 2.66). In his dedication of the play to the Earl of 
Lindsey, Pennycuicke writes: "It past the Stage with generall 
Applause (my selfe being the last that Acted Matilda in it) and 
since through the absurdity of times it hath laine obscured." 
This is the earliest information we have concerning him. After 
the closing of the playhouses in -lG^i. he followed the custom of 
certain other actors and turned publisher. In iG'yi. Robert Cham- 
berlain's Nocturnall Lucubrations was "Printed by T. F. for the 

2.-J2. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Use and Benefit of Andrewe Pennycuicke Gent" (Hazlitt, Hand- 
Book, p. 8i). He is evidently the A. P. who signed with A. T. 
(probably Anthony Turner) the dedication of William Hem- 
inges's Fafal Contract (1653), addressed to the Earl and Countess 
of Northampton, for there was another quarto in 1654, with a 
similar dedication, "Printed at London for Andrew Penny- 
cuicke" (Hazlitt, Coll. & Notes, 1867-1876, p. ioy). He published 
Ford and Dekker's Suns Darling in 1656, inscribing the play to 
the Lady Newton; and in the following year the same play ap- 
peared with a dedication to the Earl of Southampton by Penny- 
cuicke and Theophilus Bird, an actor (Hazlitt, op. cit., p. 164). 
The Hunting of the Fox, by T. F., was printed for Pennycuicke in 
1657 (Hazlitt, op. cit., p. ioi). In 1658 and 1659 he published 
Massinger's City Madam; the Countess of Oxford was the dedi- 
catee of the 1658 edition (Hazlitt, op. cit., p. z84). 

PENTON, FABIAN. 

The leader of a company of English players at Augsburg, 
Germany, in June, 1601. (Trautmann, Archiv, xiii. 317). 

PEPEREL, GILES. 

Possibly the boy who took the part of Iphigenia in The Bug- 
bears (c. 1564-65). One of the songs in the play is headed: "Giles 
peperel for Iphiginia" (Bond, Early Plays from the Italian, pp. 

83, 154)- 

PERCY, ROBERT. 

During 1586-87 Robert Percy (Rupert Persten or Persj) was on 
the Continent. The Elsinore pay-roll records that he was in the 
Danish service from June 17 to September 18, 1586. Soon he went 
to the court of the Elector of Saxony, at Dresden, where he held 
an appointment as actor-entertainer until July 17, 1587 (Cohn, 
p. xxv; Herz, p. 3; Riis, Century Magazine, Ixi. 391). Nothing is 
heard of him after this. 

2-73 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PERKIN, JOHN. 

As one of the Earl of Leicester's men in 1572. John Perkin 
signed a letter addressed to the Earl requesting his continued 
patronage; he is named in the license granted to Leicester's 
players on May 10, 1574 (M.S.C., i. x6x, 348). Possibly he is to 
be identified with the Parkins, who, dressed as a fool, appeared 
as one of the Lord of Misrule's sons in the Christmas festivities of 
i55i-53 at the Court of Edward VI (Feuillerat, Edw. & Mary, 
p. 12.6). 

PERKINS, RICHARD. 

Richard Perkins is first known as a member of Worcester's 
company in 1601-03. ^^ authorized payment on behalf of Wor- 
cester's men on September 4, i6ox; and he borrowed 10s. from 
Henslowe on March ix, 1603, when accompanying that troupe 
on a provincial tour (H.D., i. 178; ii. 301). Early in the reign of 
James I Worcester's men became Queen Anne's company. As a 
Queen's man Perkins is named in the list of players who took 
part in the coronation procession of March 15, 1604; in the patent 
of April 15, 1609; and in the duplicate license issued to the travel- 
ing company on January 7, i6ix (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 1x9; M.S.C., i. 
X70; Murray, ii. 343). With the Queen's men he acted a part, 
probably Brachiano, in Webster's White Devil. In a note appended 
to the first edition (i6ix), the playwright commends the actors 
and especially Perkins (Webster, ed. Sampson, pp. 183-84, xo6): 

For the action of the play, twas generally well, and I dare 
affirme, with the joint testimony of some of their owne quality, 
for the true imitation of life, without striving to make nature a 
monster, the best that ever became them: whereof as I make a 
generall acknowledgment, so in particular I must remember the 
well approved industry of my friend Maister Perkins, and con- 
fesse the worth of his action did crowne both the beginning 
and end. 

He was concerned in the dispute between the Queen's men and 
Thomas Greene's widow, and on June 3, 1617, refused to sign an 

2-74 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

agreement with Susan Baskervile (^Eli^i. Stage, n. 2.38). He may- 
have been with the Queen's troupe at Norwich on May 6, 161 5, 
and May 31, 1617, for his name is given in the abstracts of the 
license in the town records (Murray, ii. 340, 343). On October x, 
1 617, he, with others of the Queen's troupe, petitioned the Ses- 
sions of Peace against the various presentments that had been 
issued against them for not "repayringe the Highwayes neere 
the Red Bull" (JeafFreson, Middlesex, ii. 170). At Queen Anne's 
funeral on May 13, 1619, he was a representative of her London 
company (Murray, i. 196). On November 18, 1619, he appeared 
as a witness in the Smith-Beeston lawsuit. On June 2.j, i6xo, his 
wife, Elizabeth, testified in the same dispute as to the where- 
abouts of Emanuel Read, who was then in Ireland (Wallace, 
N.U.S., ix. 311, 335). The burial of "Elizabeth wife of Richard 
Perkins" is recorded in the register of St. James, Clerkenwell, on 
March 31, i6ii (Hovenden, iv. 151). After the Queen's death her 
London troupe was known as the Players of the Revels at the 
Red Bull. Perkins is noted in 161.1. as one of the "chiefe players" 
of this company (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63), and is named with 
Robert Lee in a warrant of November, i6xi (M.S.C, i. 2.84). 
About May, 16x3, the company seems to have disbanded, for on 
May X3 of that year John Cumber and two of his fellows pleaded 
to be excused from their payments to Susan Baskervile, on the 
ground that the other players named in the original agreement 
were either dead or with another organization (Murray, i. 199). 
Perkins evidently soon joined the King's men. As a member of 
the King's company he is mentioned in a livery allowance of 
i6x3-x4, and in the list of players who attended King James's 
funeral on May 7, 16x5 (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 93; Murray, i. 
161, opp. 17X). In 16x3 he was living "att the vpper end of St. 
lohns Streete" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). He seems to have 
become a member of Queen Henrietta's company at the Cockpit 
in Drury Lane at its formation soon after the accession of Charles 
I. With this organization he continued until 1637 (Murray, i. 

2-75 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

z6')-6j^, appearing as Sir John Belfare in Shirley's Wedding (c. 
i6i6); as Fitzwater in Davenport's King John and Matilda (c. 
162.9), where his "action gave grace to the play"; as Captain 
Goodlack in Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, Part I (c. 1630); 
and as Hanno, in Nabbes's Hannibal and Scifio (1635). He also 
played Barabas in a revival of Marlowe's Jew of Malta, by the 
Queen's men at the Cockpit, as shown by Heywood's prologue 
to the play in 1633. Heywood praises Edward Alleyn, probably 
the original performer of Barabas, and deprecates comparison 
between Alleyn and Perkins (Marlowe, Works, ii. 6): 

Nor is't hate 
To merit, in him ["Perkins," in the margin] who 

doth personate 
Our Jew this day; nor is it his ambition 
To exceed or equal, being of condition 
More modest: this is all that he intends, 
(And that too, at the urgence of some friends) 
To prove his best, and, if none here gainsay it, 
The part he hath studied, and intends to play it. 

From Wright's Historia Histrionica (1699) we learn that Perkins 
was among the "eminent actors" listed as "of principal note at 
the Cockpit" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406). At the reorganization 
of Queen Henrietta's men about October, 1637, he joined the 
Revels company at Salisbury Court, as shown by Herbert's record 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 66): "I disposed of Perkins, Sumner, 
Sherlock and Turner, to Salisbury Court, and joynd them with 
the best of that company." The amalgamated company evidently 
retained the name of the Queen's players, and Perkins apparently 
continued with the troupe at Salisbury Court until the closing of 
the playhouses in 1642. (Adams, Playhouses, p. 380). He was 
obviously one of the managers of the company, for a warrant of 
December 10, 1638, states that liveries are "to be delivered to 
Richard Perkins for himself and the others his fellows"; on Jan- 
uary 8, 1 641, he and Anthony Turner are named in another war- 
rant for liveries "for themselves and twelve of their fellows of the 

■L-/6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Queen's Majesty's company of players" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
loi, 103). Wright tells us that "Perkins and Sumner of the Cock- 
pit kept house together at Clerkenwell, and were there buried 
. . . some years before the Restoration" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, 
XV, 4ii-ii). He is probably the Richard Perkins whose burial is 
recorded in the register of St. James, Clerkenwell, on April xo, 
1650 (Hovenden, iv. x84). His portrait at Dulwich is described 
as: "Mr. Pirkines, the actor, in a 3 quarters cloth; in a gilt frame" 
(Warner, p. 2.07). He contributed prefatory verses to Heywood's 
Apology for Actors (i6ix), p. 9: 

To my loving friend and fellow, Thomas Hey wood 

Thou that do'st raile at me for seeing a play. 
How wouldst thou have me spend my idle houres? 
Wouldst have me in a taverne drinke all day. 
Melt in the sunne's heate, or walke out in showers? 

Gape at the Lottery from morne till even, 

To heare whose mottoes blankes have, and who prises? 

To hazzard all at dice (chance six or seven) 

To card or bowle? my humour this despises. 

But thou wilt answer: None of these I need. 
Yet my tir'd spirits must have recreation. 
What shall I doe that may retirement breed. 
Or how refresh my selfe, and in what fashion? 

To drabbe, to game, to drinke, all these I hate: 
Many enormous things depend on these. 
My faculties truely to recreate 
With modest mirth, and my selfe best to please. 

Give me a play, that no distaste can breed. 
Prove thou a spider, and from flowers sucke gall; 
rie, like a bee, take hony from a weed; 
For I was never puritannicall. 

I love no publicke soothers, private scorners, 
That raile 'gainst letchery, yet love a harlot: 
When I drinke, 'tis in sight, and not in corners; 
I am no open saint, and secret varlet. 

2-77 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Still, when I come to playes, I love to sit 
That all may see me in a publicke place. 
Even in the stages front, and not to git 
Into a nooke, and hood-winke there my face. 

This is the difference: such would have men deeme 
Them what they are not; I am what I seeme. 

Rich. Perkins. 

PERKINS, WILL. 

Possibly an actor whose name accidentally crept into the text 
of George a Green, printed in 1599 "As it was sundry times acted 
by the seruants of the right Honourable the Earle of Sussex." 
At line 1073 (Greene, Plays, ed. Collins, ii. 2.13), George says: 

Heere, Will Perkins, take my purse. 
Fetch me a stand of Ale. 

PERRY, WILLIAM. 

On February zj, 1615, a license was granted to William Hovell, 
William Perry, and Nathan May, presumably as representatives 
of the King's Revels company. Nothing is heard of these players 
in London, and their only recorded provincial appearance is at 
Norwich on June 17, 1615. Their license was apparently con- 
demned and withdrawn by order of the Earl of Pembroke on 
July 16, 1616 (Murray, ii. 10, 340, 343). By October 31, 1617, 
Perry had become associated with Robert Lee, Philip Rosseter, 
and Nicholas Long as patentees for the Queen's Revels company, 
and visited Norwich on August 19, 161 8. After the death of 
Queen Anne in March, 1619, this organization was known as the 
Children of the Revels to the late Queen Anne. On April 9, 16x3, 
a confirmation of the 1617 patent was granted to the company, 
which visited Norwich on May 7.4, 16x3, with Perry as manager. 
The troupe is recorded in provincial records until 162.7, and Perry 
doubtless continued as its leader. By September 18, 1619, the 
company had apparently disbanded, for on that date Perry re- 
ceived a commission to organize a group of players under the 
title of "His Majesty's servants of the city of York" (Murray, i. 

Z78 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

361, 36z; ii. 8, 345, 347). Nothing further is known of this troupe. 
On November 10, 16x9, Perry and Richard Weekes were granted 
a new license as managers of the Red Bull company, and Perry 
remained as leader of these players until the closing of the 
theatres in 16^1.. The provincial annals record his visits to Read- 
ing on November 30, 16x9, and again in November, 1630; Don- 
caster, July 15, i63x; Leicester, after February 19, 1633 ; Coventry, 
before December 4, i633;Norwich, July 3, 1633, and March, 1634; 
Leicester, before November xx, 1635; Canterbury, March, 1636; 
Doncaster, April ■2.^, i636(?); Norwich, May 11, 1636; and 
Coventry, between December, 1641, and December 7, 16^1. (Mur- 
ray, i. X7X-78; ii. x^z, Z54, z^y, 318, 354, 358, 386). 

PERSJ, RUPERT. 
See Robert Percy. 

PERSONN, JOHANN. 

Johann Personn was associated with a troupe of English players 
at the Danish Court during 1579-80 (Bolte, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99 fF.). 

PERSTEN, RUPERT. 
See Robert Percy. 

PERY, ROBERT. 

A member of the Chapel Royal from 15x9 to 153 1 (Eli^. Stage, 
ii. i7«.). 

PERY, WILLIAM. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 1530 (Eliz.. Stage, ii. zjn.'). 

"PETER"(?)- 

Possibly a King's man. The 16x3 Shakespeare folio edition of 
The Taming of the Shrew, IV, iv. 68, gives the stage-direction: 
"Enter Peter." Peter is perhaps Tranio's servant, who does not 
speak; and the name may be that of the character, not of the actor 
taking the part. 

2.79 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PETTINGTON, HENRY. 

Henry Pettington is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January ix, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 
servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

PFLUGBEIL, AUGUST. 

During 1 614-15 August Pflugbeil is recorded in Germany with 
a group of English players in the service of John Sigismund, 
Elector of Brandenburg (Cohn, p. Ixxxviii). 

PHEN, EZEKIEL. 
See Ezekiel Fenn. 

PHILIP, ROBERT. 
A member of the Chapel Royal in 15 14 (Eli^. Stage, ii. irjn^^ 

PHILLIPP, PETER. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1574 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

PHILLIPPE, ROBERT. 

A "momer," who was buried at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, on 
April 9, 1559 (Collier, Actors, p. j^n.^. 

PHILLIPS, AUGUSTINE. 

Augustine Phillips played Sardanapalus in "Sloth" of 2 Seven 
Deadly Sins for Strange's men about 1590 (Greg, H.P., p. I'^z; 
R.E.S., i. i6i), and is named in the traveling license granted by 
the Privy Council to Strange's company on May 6, 1593 QEliz- 
Stage, ii. 1x3). Subsequently, he joined the Chamberlain's men, 
presumably when the troupe was organized in 1594. His name 
occurs in the actor-lists of Every Man in his Humor (1598) and of 
Every Man out of his Humor (1599), both played by the Chamber- 
lain's company. He was one of the original shareholders in the 

2.80 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Globe syndicate on February xi, 1599 (Adams, Playhouses, p. 2.39). 
On February 18, 1601, he was called to testify concerning the 
performance of Richard II by the Chamberlain's men, because the 
play was regarded by some persons as a means of predisposing the 
mind of the populace to the cause of the Earl of Essex in his 
attempt to dethrone Queen Elizabeth (Colllier, iii. 32.4). In 1603 
the Chamberlain's men passed under royal patronage; Phillips is 
named in the patent granted to the King's company on May 19, 
1603 QM.S.C, i. ^64). As a King's man he appears in the 162.3 folio 
list of Shakespearean players; in the actor-list of Sejanus (1603); 
and among the actors who took part in the coronation procession 
on March 15, 1604. "Phillips his gigg of the slyppers" was enter- 
ed in the Stationers' Registers on May xG, 1595 (Arber, ii. X98). 
Children of Augustine Phillips, who is described as "histrionis," 
"player of interludes," or "player," are recorded in the registers 
of St. Saviour's, Southwark (Collier, iii. -^zir-xy): Magdalen 
(baptized September 19, 1594), Rebecca (baptized July 11, 1596), 
and Awstyn or Augustine (baptized November 19, 1601; buried 
July I, 1604). The register of St. Bodolph Aldgate records the 
burial of "A childe daughter of Augustine Phillipps, A player," 
on September 7, 1597 (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 105). The token- 
books of St. Saviour's give his residence as Horse-shoe Court in 
1593 and 1595, later near the Swan playhouse in Paris Garden, 
Montague Close in 1601, Bradshaw's Rents in i6oi, and Horse- 
shoe Court again in 1604 (Collier, iii. 3x5; Rendle, Bankside, p. 
xxv). Bentley (T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856) gives his address in 
1593 as "bulhed allye." By May 4, 1605, when he made his will, 
he had moved to Mortlake, Surrey, where he "lately purchased 
. . . house and land." His will mentions his wife, Anne; his 
daughters, Magdalen, Rebecca, Anne, and Elizabeth; his mother, 
Agnes Bennett; his brothers, William and James Webb; his sister, 
Margery Borne, perhaps wife of William Borne, alias Bird (^.f.), 
with her sons, Myles and Phillipps; and his sister, Elizabeth 
Goughe, who had married Robert Goughe (^.f .) in 1603 (Collier, 

xSi 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

iii. 317-19). His personal relations with the members of his com- 
pany are reflected in legacies of £5 to "the hyred men of the com- 
pany which I am of"; 3oj-. gold-pieces to his "fellowes" William 
Shakespeare and Henry Condell, and his "servaunte" Christopher 
Beeston; xos. gold-pieces to his "fellowes" Lawrence Fletcher, 
Robert Armin, Richard Cowley, Alexander Cook, and Nicholas 
Tooley; and "a boule of silver of the value of fyve pounds a piece" 
to John Heminges, Richard Burbage, and William Sly, the over- 
seers of the will. Samuel Gilburne "my late apprentice," received 
40^, and "my mouse colloured velvit hose, and a white tefFety dub- 
let, a blacke taffety sute, my purple cloke, sword, and dagger, and 
my base viall." James Sands, "my apprentice," was bequeathed 
40J-. and ' 'a citterne, a bandore, and a lute, to be paid and delivered 
unto him at the expiration of his terme of yeres in his indenture 
of apprenticehood." His wife Anne is appointed executrix, on 
condition that if she re-marries she is to have "no parte or por- 
tion of my goods or chattels." Robert Goughe is a witness to the 
will. Phillips died between May 4, when he made his will, and 
May 13, when the will was proved by his widow. The will was 
proved again on May 16, 1607, because Anne Phillips forfeited 
her right by marrying John Witter within less than two years 
after the death of her first husband. This marriage subsequently 
led to a lawsuit between Witter, who squandered his wife's 
estate, and Heminges and Condell, concerning Phillips's share in 
the Globe property (Wallace, N.U.S., x. 305 ff.). Early in the 
reign of James I Phillips was mentioned in a notice of heraldic 
irregularities by William Smith, Rouge Dragon Pursuivant in the 
College of Heralds, who states that "Phillipps the player had 
graven in a gold ring armes of Sr Wm Phillipp, Lord Bardolph, 
with the said L. Bardolph's cote quartred, which I shewed to 
Mr York at a small graver's shopp in Foster Lane" (Adams, 
Shakespeare, p. 147). Heywood, Apology for Actors (i6ix), p. 43, 
names him among other dead players, whose "deserts" he com- 
memorates. 

i8z 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PICKERING, JAMES. 

James Pickering, mason, is mentioned as an unlicensed player 
of Bowlby, Yorkshire, in i6ii QEli^- Stage, i. 305«.)- 

PICKLEHERRING. 

See Robert Reynolds. 

PIERS, EDWARD. 
See Edward Pearce. 

PIG, JOHN. 

John Pig (Pyk, Pyge, or Pigge) was Edward Alleyn's boy or 
apprentice. A letter from Pig to Joan Alleyn, undated, but pre- 
sumably written during the provincial tour of Strange 's men in 
1593, is preserved, in which he refers to himself as "yor petty 
prety pratlyng parlyng pyg." He appears as a witness on August 
17, 1594, and March xy, 1599. His name occurs in the inventories 
of the Admiral's company in 1598: "j red sewt of cloth for pyge, 
layed with whitt lace." With the Admiral's men he played the 
title-role in Alice Fierce, about 1597; Andreo in Frederick and 
Basilea, 1597; and an unindentified part in the non-extant Troilus 
and Cressida, about 1599 (H.D., ii. 303; H.F., pp. 41, 115, 153, 
154; Warner, p. 1x7). 

PIGGE, JOHN. 
See John Pig. 

PLUMFIELD, THOMAS. 

Thomas Plumfield's name appears in a warrant of May 10, 1631, 
appointing several of Prince Charles's men as Grooms of the 
Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). 

PLUMMER, JOHN. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1444-55 (Wallace, Evolution^ 
pp. XI ff.). 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

POKELEY, RICHARD. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

POLE. 

The gatekeeper at Paul's, named as a legatee in the will of 
Sebastian Westcott, dated April 3, i58x QEltz.- Stage, ii. i6«.). 

POLLARD, THOMAS. 

Thomas Pollard appears to have begun his theatrical career 
with the King's men as John Shank's apprentice, as suggested by 
the Sharers' Papers of 1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 316). 
He was evidently with the King's men from about 1617 to the 
closing of the playhouses in i64i, and assumed parts in the follow- 
ing plays presented by that company (Murray, i. opp. 171): 
The Queen of Corinth (c. 1617); Holderus and a servant in Sir John 
van Olden Barnavelt (1619; ed. Frijlinck, p. clx); The Humorous 
Lieutenant (c. 1619); Silvio in The Duchess of Malfi (1619-2.3); 
The Laws of Candy (c. i6ii); The Island Princess (c. i6ii); The 
Spanish Curate (162.1); The Maid in the Mill (1613); The Lover s 
Progress (1613); Aelius Lamia in The Roman Actor (licensed Oc- 
tober II, i6i6); The Lover's Melancholy (licensed November 14, 
162.8); Ubaldo, a wild courtier, in The Picture (licensed June 8, 
16x9); Pinac in The Wildgoose Chase (a revival, 163 1), with the 
comment, "Admirably well acted"; and Berecynthus, in Believe 
as You List (licensed May 7, 163 1). His name occurs in the sub- 
mission for playing The Spanish Viceroy, without license, Decem- 
ber zo, 16x4; among the players who took part in King James's 
funeral procession. May 7, 162.5; in the patent of June 2.4, 162.5; 
and in the cloak allowance of May 6, 16x9. In 1635, after the peti- 
tion by him, Benfield, and Swanston, he controlled one whole 
share in the Globe and one-third of a share in the Blackfriars 
(Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 8; Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 313- 

2.84 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

14). He is mentioned in the Epilogue to Shirley's Cardinal, 
licensed November X5, 1641 (Shirley, Works, v. t,^z; Adams, 
Dram. Rec, p. 39): 

[Within] Master Pollard! where's master Pollard, for the 

epilogue? [He is thrust u-pon the stage, and falls. 

Epilogue [rising]. I am coming to you, gentlemen; the poet 

Has helped me thus far on my way, but I'll 

Be even with him . . . 

His name is appended to the dedicatory epistle of the 1647 folio 
of Beaumont and Fletcher's plays, published by a group of the 
King's players (Beaumont and Fletcher, Works, i. p. x). Wright 
in Historia Histrionica (1699) tells us that ' 'before the wars . . . 
Pollard and Robinson were comedians ... of Blackfriars"; 
that at the outbreak of civil war he was "superannuated"; that 
he played the Cook in Rollo, or the Bloody Brother, at the Cockpit 
in 1648; and that he "lived single, and had a competent estate, 
retired to some relations he had in the country, and there ended 
his life" (Hazlitt, Dodsley, xv. 405-06, 409, 411). In A Key to the 
Cabinet of the Parliament (1648), he is mentioned with two other 
celebrated players (Collier, ii. 38): "We need not any more 
stage-plays: we thank them [the Puritans] for suppressing them: 
they save us money; for I'll undertake we can laugh as heartily 
at Foxley, Peters, and others of their godly ministers, as ever we 
did at Cane at the Red Bull, Tom Pollard in The Humorous Lieu- 
tenant, Robins in The Changling, or any humourist of them all." 
On January x8, 1648, he with others of the King's company gave 
a bond to pay off an old Blackfriars debt to Michael Bowyer's 
heirs. He was dead by Easter term, 1655 (Hotson, pp. 31-34). 

POPE, THOMAS. 

During 1586-87 Thomas Pope was on the Continent. The Elsi- 
nore pay-roll records that he was in the Danish service from June 
17 to September 18, 1586. Soon he went to the Court of the Elector 
of Saxony, at Dresden, Germany, where he held an appointment 

x85 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

as actor-entertainer until July 17, 1587 (Cohn, p. xxv; Riis, 
Century Magazine, Ixi. 391; Herz, p. 3). He is next heard of as 
playing Arbactus in "Sloth" of 2 Seven Deadly Sins for Strange's 
men about 1590 (Greg, H.F., p. i5x; R.E.S., i. x62.). He is named 
in the traveling license granted by the Privy Council to Strange's 
company on May 6, 1593 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 1x3). Subsequently he 
joined the Chamberlain's men, presumably when the troupe was 
organized in 1594. With this company he played in Every Man in 
his Humor (1598) and Every Man out of his Humor (1599). He was 
joint-payee with John Heminges for the Court performances by 
the Chamberlain's men from November 2.j, 1597, to October x, 
1599 (Steele, pp. iii, 113, 116). On August 30, 1598, William 
Bird obtained a loan of \os. from Henslowe "to folowe the sewt 
agenst Thomas poope" (H.D., ii. 303). He was one of the original 
shareholders in the Globe organization on February xi, 1599 
(Adams, Playhouses, p. X39). In 1600 he and John Singer, of the 
Admiral's company, are mentioned by Samuel Rowlands in The 
Letting of Humours Blood in the Head-Vaine, Satire iv, p. 63 (Works, i) : 

What meanes Singer then? 
And Pofe the Clowne, to speak so Boorish, when 
They counterfaite the Clownes vpon the Stage? 

His name occurs in the 16x3 folio list of actors in Shakespeare's 
plays. He had doubtless retired before the Chamberlain's troupe 
passed under royal patronage, for he is not mentioned in the 
patent granted to the King's men on May 19, 1603. The token- 
books of St. Saviour's, Southwark, give his residence as Blamer's 
Rents in 1593, Wrench's Rents in 1595, and Mr. Langley's New 
Rents in 1596, 1598, 1600, and i6ox (Collier, iii. 359; Rendle, 
Bankside, p. xxvi). The register of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, 
records the marriage of a Thomas Pope and Elizabeth Baly on 
December xo, 1584 (Collier, Actors, p. xxxvi); but the wording 
of the player's will seems to indicate that he was never married 
(Collier, iii. 359-63). He made his will on July xx, 1603, and it 
was proved on February 13, 1604. He left £100 and considerable 

x86 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

property to Suzan Gasquine, "whom I have brought up ever since 
she was born"; his shares in the Globe and Curtain to Mary 
Clark, alias Wood, and Thomas Bromley; to Robert Goughe and 
John Edmans or Edmonds (^.v.), "all my wearing apparel, and 
all my arms, to be equally divided between them"; and £xo each 
to his mother Agnes Webbe, and his brothers John and William 
Pope. Together with his fellow-actor Augustine Phillips Q.v.'), 
Pope is mentioned in a complaint against heraldic irregularities: 
' 'Pope the player would have no other armes but the armes of Sr 
Tho. Pope, Chancelor of ye Augmentations" (Adams, Shake- 
speare, p. 148). Heywood, Apology for Actors (i6ii), p. 43, praises 
him with other dead players whose "deserts yet live in the 
remembrance of many. 

POWLTON, THOMAS. 

Thomas Powlton is not mentioned in the license given to 
Worcester's troupe on January 14, 1583, but he appears as "my 
lord of Worcesters man" on March 6, 1584, when the players 
were engaged in a dispute with the authorities at Leicester 
(Eliz,. Stage, ii. 7.2.x-2.y). 

PRICE, JOHN. 

John Price, a musician, was probably with a company of 
English players (known as the Hessian comedians) in the service 
of Maurice of Hesse, when he visited Stuttgart in 1609. Subse- 
quently he is known as a celebrated musician, especially as a 
flutist, at the Courts of Stuttgart, 16x5, and Dresden, 16x9 (Cohn, 
pp. xcviiw., cxxxviii). 

PRICE, RICHARD. 

A writer signing himself "Dramaticus," in Shakespeare Society's 
Papers, iv. no, describes a copy of Dekker's Shoemaker s Holiday 
with alleged manuscript notes giving the cast of the play as pro- 
duced by the Admiral's men about 1600. To Price is assigned the 
part of Scott. Greg discredits the list as "an obvious forgery" 
(H.D., ii. i03). 

x87 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PRICE, RICHARD. 

A "Rychard Pryore" in a household list of Prince Henry's 
players in 1610 is presumably identical with the Richard Price 
named in the patent of January 11, 1613, granted to the Pals- 
grave's men, who had passed under the patronage of the Pals- 
grave after the death of Prince Henry in November, i6ix QEliz- 
Stage, ii. 188, 190). He is known as a Palsgrave's man until 1614. 
With other members of the Palsgrave's company he appears as a 
lessee of the Fortune playhouse on October 31, 161 8, and of the 
new Fortune on May xo, 1G2.2. (H.F., pp. xy, i.<^. He is named in 
Herbert's list of the troupe in iGia. (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). 
On April 9, 162.0, he dined with Edward Alleyn (Warner, p. 184). 
In 16x3 he lived "in White Crosse Streete" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 348). The registers of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, record child- 
ren of his from i6xo to 16x7, describing him as gentleman, yeo- 
man, or player (Elix.. Stage, ii. 335), and record his own burial 
in 16x7 (Malcolm, Land. Rediv., iii. 304). On April 30, 16x4, he 
and others of the Palsgrave's men entered into a bond to Richard 
Gunnell, manager of the company (Hotson, pp. 5X-53). 

PROCTOR. 

Proctor is mentioned in the plot of the non-extant Troilus and 
Cressida, an Admiral's play presented about 1599 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 
158). In his review of Chambers's Elizabethan Stage, Greg (R.E.S., 
i. no) says that Proctor is "evidently a character, not an actor." 

PRUN, PETER DE. 

A company of English players under the leadership of Peter de 
Prun, of Brussels, visited Nuremberg in April, 1594 (Trautmann, 
Archiv, xiv. 116). 

PRYNCE, RICHARD. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

x88 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PRYORE, RYCHARD. 

See Richard Price. 

PUDSEY, EDWARD. 

Edward Pudsey was the leader of a troupe of English players 
at Strassburg in June, 162.8, and appears with Robert Reynolds's 
company in Germany during 1640 (Herz, pp. 54, 55). He is per- 
haps identical with the Edward Pudsey whose manuscript note- 
book contains Shakespearean extracts (printed by R. Savage, in 
Stratford-upon-Avon Note Books, 1888, i). 

PULHAM, GEORGE. 

A "half sharer" in Queen Anne's company, "who died, one 
of the said Companie," shortly before Thomas Greene's death in 
August, i6ix. His executors were given £40 by the Queen's men 
for his half-share (Fleay, Stage, p. x8o; Murray, i. 193). 

PYE, JOHN. 

A "momer," whose son Samuel was baptized at St. Leonard's, 
Shoreditch, on May i8, 1559 QEliz. Stage, ii. 335). 

PYGE, JOHN. 
See John Pig. 

PYK, JOHN. 
See John Pig. 

PYKMAN, PHILLIP. 

A member of the Chapel Royal about 1600-01. In Henry Clif- 
ton's complaint to the Star Chamber on December 15, 1601, as to 
how boys were pressed for the Chapel at Blackfriars, Phillip 
Pykman is named as one so taken, and is described with Thomas 
Grymes as "apprentices to Richard and Georg Chambers" (Wal- 
lace, Blackfriars, p. 80). 

2.89 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

PYTCHER, CAROLUS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

RADSTONE, JOHN. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314}. 

RAINESCROFTE, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

RASTELL, WILLIAM. 

A partner with Edward Kirkham and Thomas Kendall in the 
management of the Second Blackfriars playhouse, as shown by 
Articles of Agreement signed on April 2.0, i6oz (Adams, Play- 
houses, p. 2.13). He died in 1608 (Eli^,. Stage, ii. 335). 

RAWLYNS, JOHN. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

RAYE, RALPH. 

Ralph Raye borrowed £10 from Henslowe about May 13, 1594. 
He is described as "my lorde chamberlenes man," but whether 
he was an actor or a common servant is not known (H.D., ii. 305). 

READE, EMANUEL. 

The 1679 folio of Beaumont and Fletcher names Emanuel Reade 
as one of the "principal actors" in The Coxcomb and in The Honest 
Man's Fortune, both of which were probably performed by the 
Lady Elizabeth's company in 1613 (^Eliz,. Stage, ii. i5i). By 1616 
he had joined Queen Anne's men, for in June of that year he is 
mentioned in the Baskervile papers as a member of the company. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

On June 3 of the following year he refused to sign an agreement 
with Susan Baskervile (^Eliz. Stage, ii. ^37). About 1617 he took 
up permanent residence in Ireland, as shown by the records of the 
Smith-Beeston lawsuit (Wallace, N.U.S., ix. 335-36); thus his 
name disappears from dramatic annals. On June -lj, 161.0, Eliza- 
beth Perkins, wife of the well-known actor Richard Perkins, 
made "othe that Emanuell Reade hath made his abode in Jreland 
by the space of two or three yeares last past or thereaboutes with 
his wief & familie and about Easter last did come into England 
and did lye often tymes in the howse of the said xpofer Beeston & 
was much in his company whilest he was in England. And about 
Whitsontyde last the saide Emanuell Reade went againe into 
Jreland & at his departure he sayde that he thought he should 
never returne agayne into England." 

READE, JOHN. 

The registers of St. Bodolph Aldgate record the burial on Sep- 
tember 13, 1600, of "A woman Chyld daughter to Jhon Read a 
Player." The same registers record the burial on June 14, 1608, of 
"Anne Reade a norse [sic] childe daughter to John Reade of 
Saviours parish in Southwarke" (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 106). 

READE, TIMOTHY. 

Timothy Reade first appears as Cardona, Gratiana's maid, in 
Shirley's Wedding, a play acted about May, i6i6, by Queen 
Henrietta's men at the Cockpit in Drury Lane. He is recorded at 
Norwich on March 10, 1635, when his troupe, presumably the 
King's Revels, applied for permission to act in that town (Mur- 
ray, i. opp. ■!.€€, X79-8o). He is one of the speakers in The Stage- 
Players Complaint, in a -pleasant Dialogue between Cane of the Fortune 
and Reed of the Friers, deploring their sad and solitary condition for the 
want of Imployment , in this heavie and Contagious time of the Plague 
in London (1641). In The Complaint, Cane and Reed are brought 
together in the street conversing about their misfortunes. The 
dialogue commences thus : 

191 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Cane. Stay, Reed. Whither away so speedily? What, you 
goe as if you meant to leape over the Moon now! What's the 
matter? 

Reede. The matter is plain enough. You incuse me of my nimble 
feet, but I thinke your tongue runnes a little faster and you con- 
tend as much to outstrip facetious Mercury in your tongue, as 
lame Vulcan in my feete. 

In the next speeches, and for the rest of the dialogue, Cane is 
called Quick in the prefixes, and Reade, Light, which are perhaps 
the nicknames by which they were then popularly known (Haz- 
litt, Eng. Drama (b" Stage, p. 153). From Perfect Occurrences of Every 
Daie Journall we learn that Reade was arrested on October 6, 1647, 
during a performance of Beaumont and Fletcher's A King and no 
King, at Salisbury Court (Rollins, Stud, in Phil., xviii. x83): 
"The Sheriffes of the City of London with their officers went 
thither, and found a great number of people; some young Lords, 
and other eminent persons; and the men and women with the 
Boxes, [that took monies] fled. The Sheriffes brought away Tim 
Reede the Foole, and the people cryed out for their monies, but 
slunke away like a company of drowned Mice without it." That 
he was a popular comedian is shown by two allusions to' him. 
Edmund Gayton applauds him in Pleasant Notes upon Don Quixot 
(1654), p. 86: "when as at a Bartholmewtide, the Fights and 
Travels of this great Knight-Errant are to be seen, and himselfe 
represented (for these honours came after his death) to the life, 
by Timotheo Reado of Tiveri-ae, who was the most incomparable 
mimicke upon the face of the Earth. ' ' He is also praised in Thomas 
Goffe's Careless Shepherdess, published in 1656 but acted at Court 
about 1615-2.9 (Collier, Bibl. Ace, iv. 93; Steele, Plays at Court, 
p. xSo): 

There is ne'er a part 
About him but breaks jests. — 
I never saw Reade peeping through the curtain, 
But ravishing joy entered my heart. 



Z9Z 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

READING, WILLIAM. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). By December ^5, 1559, Reading was a Court 
Interluder, and probably continued so until his death in 1563 
QEliZ- Stage, ii. 83, 84; Murray, i. 3). 

REASON, GILBERT. 

Gilbert Reason was a member of Prince Charles's troupe from 
1 610 to 16x5. He is named in the patent of March 30, 1610; and 
as leader of the traveling company, by a duplicate license of May 
31, 1613. On March 30, 1616, he visited Norwich. He is mentioned 
in Pembroke's order of July 16, 1616, for the suppression of cer- 
tain irregular provincial troupes; but he must have satisfied the 
requirements for a bona fide company, and continued to appear 
in the provinces. The Coventry accounts record him and his com- 
pany on August ^4, i6ii. Any doubt as to the legality of his 
patent in 161 6 was certainly overcome by November xo, 16x2., as 
shown by his carrying on provincial tours the Lord Chamber- 
lain's warrant of that date, "Comandinge to seise all patents that 
shall not be vnder the seale of office of the master of the Revells. 
He and William Eaton were payees for the Prince's men at Coven- 
try on December i3, i6ix. He is recorded at Norwich on May 31, 
1613, and January ^9, 162.5. The provincial company under his 
management seems to have disbanded before May 7, 16x5, by 
which date he was associated with the Prince's London players 
who took part in King James's funeral procession (Murray, i. 
161, i3o-33, 137, 2.40-42-; ii- M9. 34i' 347, 350- 

REDFORD, JOHN. 

From Thomas Tusser's autobiographical verses, printed with 
the 1573 edition of his Five Hundred Pointes of Good Hush andrie (ed. 
Payne and Herrtage, pp. xiii, 2.07), we learn that John Redford 
was Master of the Children of Paul's, about 1540: 

2-93 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

But marke the chance, my self to vance, 
By friendships lot, to Paules I got, 
So found I grace, a certaine space, 

still to remaine: 
With Redford there, the like no where, 
For cunning such, and vertue much. 
By whom some part of Musicke art, 

so did I gaine. 

His play, Wyf and Science (c. 1530-48), is reprinted in Adams, 
Chief Pre-Shakesfearean Dramas, p. 3x5. 

REEVE, RALPH. 

Ralph Reeve is known on the Continent from 1603 to 1609. 
For some years he was associated with Richard Machin, formerly 
a member of the Hessian troupe. He visited Frankfort at Easter, 
1603, 1605, and 1606, and during the autumn of 1605. By 1608 he 
had come under the patronage of Maurice of Hesse, and had suc- 
ceeded Machin as leader of the Hessian company. He continued 
as manager of this troupe of English players until the autumn of 
1609. His appearances are recorded at the Frankfort Easter and 
autumn fairs of 1608 and 1609 (Herz, pp. 39-40). He had returned 
to England by August 10, 161 1, when he visited Norwich with 
a company of actors, presumably the Children of the Queen's 
Revels. As leader of these players he presented a license that had 
been issued to Philip Rosseter, and affirmed that he was Rosseter. 
The town authorities discovered the deception, and he confessed 
that his name was Reeve (Murray, i. 359; ii. 339). On June 3, 
1 61 5, he and Rosseter and others are named as patentees for the 
erection of Porter's Hall playhouse in Blackfriars (Adams, 
Playhouses, p. 343). 

RESTER. 

As an Admiral's man, Rester appeared as a Cannibal in the 
procession of i Tamar Cam, about October, i6ox (H.P., p. 154). 

2-94 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

REYNOLDS, ROBERT. 

Robert Reynolds appears as a member of Queen Anne's com- 
pany in June, 1616 and 1617, when he is mentioned in the Basker- 
vile papers (Elix.. Stage, ii. X37, X38). The Middlesex records name 
him and his wife Jane in an indictment for non-attendance at 
church in 1616 and 1617 (Jeaffreson, ii. ixo, 12.7). He is not other- 
wise known in England, but evidently attained considerable 
popularity in Germany under the clown-name Pickleherring. He 
accompanied John Green at Danzig in July, 161 6, and Robert 
Browne at Strassburg in June and July, and at Frankfort for the 
autumn fair, 161 8. He apparently acted Nobody in the play of 
Nobody and Somebody, to which the clown refers in his farewell 
speech on leaving Frankfort to go to Prague : 

Vorm Jahr war ich gering, 

Ein aus der Maszen gut Pickelharing, 

Mein Antlitz in tausend Manieren, 

Konnt ich holdselig figurieren. 

Alles was ich erbracht, 

Das hat man ja stattlich belacht, 

Ich war der Niemand kennt ihr mich? 

Last year I was a mighty good Pickleherring, 
I could twist my face in a thousand ways, 
Everything that I did gave great amusement, 
I was Nobody: do you recognize me? 

By 1616-2.7 he had returned to Green's players, when they visited 
Frankfort, Dresden, and Torgau. Green now^ disappears from the 
German records, and Reynolds seems to have taken the leader- 
ship of the troupe. In the housing-list at Torgau in 16x7, he is 
called Pickleherring. From Torgau the company journeyed to 
Dresden, thence to Nuremberg in July, and to Frankfort for the 
autumn fair of the same year (Herz, pp. 30-31, 114)- During i6i8 
he visited Frankfort at the Easter fair; Cologne in May; Nurem- 
berg in July; and Frankfort again for the autumn fair. He is re- 
corded at Cologne in 1631, and is mentioned on July 11, 1640, in 

2-95 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

a letter from Elector George William, granting safe conduct to 
certain players in Germany (Herz, pp. 54 fF.)- 

REYNOLDS, WILLIAM. 

William Reynolds acted Francisco, a Jesuit, in Massinger's 
Renegado, printed in 1630 as presented by Queen Henrietta's men 
at the Cockpit in Drury Lane (Murray, i. opp. !.€€). 

RHODES, JOHN. 

John Rhodes is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December xy, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by 
the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as 
Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
p. 74). By 1 6x8 he was a London bookseller (McKerrow, Dic- 
tionary, p. xxy). He probably continued as a bookseller through 
the period of the Civil War and Commonwealth, and became one 
of the first theatrical managers of the Restoration. Downes (Ros. 
Ang., p. 17) informs us that "In the Year 1659 . . . Mr. Rhodes 
a Bookseller being Wardrobe-Keeper formerly (as I am inform'd) 
to King Charles the First's Company of Comedians in Black- 
Friars; getting a License from the then Governing State, fitted 
up a House then for Acting call'd the Cock-pit in Drury Lane, 
and in a short time Compleated his Company." His troupe, which 
included Thomas Betterton, the greatest actor of his time, had 
by November 5, 1660, passed under the management of William 
Davenant (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 96), and subsequently became 
the Duke of York's men at Lincoln's Inn Fields (Nicoll, Rest. 
Drama, p. 183). Rhodes apparently organized another company, 
for he received payment for a Court performance of November i , 
i66x, and was granted a license to travel in the provinces on 
January x, 1663 . His company was probably taken into the patron- 
age of the Duchess of Portsmouth (Nicoll, of. cit., pp. 178-79). 

RICE, JOHN. 

John Rice is described as Heminges's "boy" when he took part 
in the entertainment given by the Merchant Taylors in honor of 

196 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

King James on July i6, 1607 (_Eli:i. Stage, ii. 32.1). On May 31, 
1610, he was associated with Richard Burbage in a pageant on 
the Thames in honor of the creation of Prince Henry as Prince 
of Wales. He appeared as "Corinea, a very fayre and beautifull 
Nimphe, representing the Genius of olde Corineus Queene, and 
the Prouince of Cornewall, suited in her watrie habit yet riche 
and costly, with a Coronet of Pearles and Cockle Shelles on her 
head" (Wallace, London Times, March z8, 1913, p. 6). By August 
^9, 161 1, he was a member of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe, joining 
his fellow-actors in giving Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform 
"certen articles" of agreement (H.P., pp. 18, iii). Subsequently 
he was again with the King's men. With this company he acted 
a captain and Barnavelt's servant in Sir John van Olden Barnavelt 
(ed. Frijlinck, p. clx), in August, 1619; the Marquesse of Pescara 
in The Duchess of Malfi, at some date between 1619 and 1613; 
and a part in The False One, about 161.0. He appears as a member 
of the King's company in the 16x3 folio list of Shakespearean 
actors; in the livery allowance of April 7, i6xi; in the sub- 
mission for playing The Spanish Viceroy without license, 
December xo, 16x4; at King James's funeral on May 7, 162.5; 
and in the patent of June 2.4, 16x5 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. xi; 
Chambers and Greg, M.S.C., i. xSx; Murray, i. 161, opp. lyx; 
ii. 146 fF.). His name does not occur in the livery allowance 
list of May 6, 16x9, by which date he had probably retired 
and taken orders, for John Heminges, by his will dated 1630, 
left XOJ-. as "a remembrance of my love" to "John Rice, 
clerk, of St. Saviour's, in Southwark," and named "Mr. 
Rice" as overseer of the will (Collier, iii. 319, 3x0, 487). A 
John Rice lived in Southwark during 161 5, and with an 
"uxor . . . near the playhouse" in 1619, in 16x1, and in 16x3, 
as shown by the parish token-books (^Eli^. Stage, ii. 336; 
Collier, iii. 488); he is described as "of the Bancksyde" in 
the Gervase Markham lawsuit with certain players and 
others during 16x3 (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 348). 

2-97 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ROBINS, WILLIAM. 

William Robins (sometimes known as Robinson or Robson) 
appears as a member of Queen Anne's company from 1616 to 1619. 
He is named in the Baskervile papers of June, 161 6 and 161 7 
(^Eliz. Stage, ii. ■lt,j, i38), and in the list of players who attended 
the Queen's funeral on May 13, 1619 (Murray, i. 196). After the 
death of the Queen her London company was known as the 
Players of the Revels at the Red Bull, of which Robins is noted 
in 162.x as one of the "chiefe players" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). 
He seems subsequently to have transferred his services to the 
provincial company, the Players of the late Queen Anne, and may 
reasonably be identified with the Robson named with Martin 
Slater and one Silvester as payees for the troupe at Coventry on 
October 16, 162.5 (Murray, i. 188; ii. "2-^6). Shortly after this date 
he must have passed to Queen Henrietta's men at the Cockpit in 
Drury Lane; and presumably he continued with them until the 
breaking up of the company in 1637. As a member of this organ- 
ization he assumed the following parts (Murray, i. opp. 7.66^: 
Rawbone, a thin citizen, in Shirley's Wedding (c. May, i6i6); 
Clem, a drawer of wine under Bess Bridges, in Heywood's 
Fair Maid of the West, Part I (c. 1630); and Carazie, a eunuch, in 
Massinger's Renegado (printed in 1630). In Wright's Historia 
Histrionica (1699), he is mentioned as a comedian among those 
"of principal note at the Cockpit" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406). 
When Queen Henrietta's company disbanded in 1637 some of the 
members united with the Revels company at Salisbury Court and 
others joined Beeston's Boys at the Cockpit; but Robins is not 
known to have joined either of these troupes. By 1641 he was a 
King's man, his name appearing in a warrant of January 7.2. of that 
year (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). In A Key to the Cabinet of the 
Parliament (1648), he is mentioned with two other celebrated 
players (Collier, ii. 38): "We need not any more stage-plays: we 
thank them [the Puritans] for suppressing them: they save us 
money; for I'll undertake we can laugh as heartily at Foxley, 

198 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Peters, and others of their godly ministers, as ever we did at Cane 
at the Red Bull, Tom Pollard in The Humorous Lieutenant, Robins 
in The Changling, or any humourist of them all." In 162.3 he lived 
"on Clarkenwell hill" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 348). Evidence 
seems to favor Collier's identification (H.E.D.P., iii. 479) of 
William Robins with the Robinson who was killed at Basing 
House in October, 1645, while fighting for the King, although 
Wright in Historia Histnonka (1699) apparently implies that 
Richard Robinson (j^.v.') was the victim of Harrison's thirst for 
blood. Wright says: "Robinson was killed at the taking of a 
place (I think Basing House) by Harrison, he that was after 
hanged at Charing Cross, who refused him quarter, and shot him 
in the head when he had laid down his arms; abusing Scripture 
at the same time in saying. Cursed is he that doth the work of the Lord 
negligently" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 409). Hugh Peters, the noted 
Puritan minister, executed after the Restoration, who was at- 
tending Cromwell's army as chaplain, made the following report 
of the episode to Parliament (Sprigg, Anglia Rediviva, 1647, edit. 
1854, pp. 150-51): "That he came into Basing-house some time 
after the storm, on Tuesday the 14th of October 1645 • • ■ In 
the several rooms, and about the house, there were slain seventy- 
four . . . There lay dead upon the ground, major Cuffle, (a 
man of great account amongst them, and a notorious papist,) 
slain by the hands of major Harrison, (that godly and gallant 
gentleman,) and Robinson the player, who, a little before the 
storm, was known to be mocking and scorning the parliament 
and our army." In all probability Robins was slain during this 
affray of 1645 • ^^^ ^^ been alive in 1647 his name would doubtless 
have been appended to the dedicatory epistle of the 1647 folio of 
Beaumont and Fletcher, published by a group of his fellow-actors 
of the King's men. 

ROBINSON, JAMES. 

In 1600 James Robinson was associated with Nathaniel Giles 
and Henry Evans in the management of the Children of the Chapel 

Z99 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Royal at the Second Blackfriars playhouse (Adams, Playhouses^ 
pp. Z05, 2.13). 

ROBINSON, JOHN. 

John Robinson is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town. He played Saufellus, chief of counsel 
to Silius and Messallina, in Richards's Messallina, the Roman 
Empress^ printed in 1640 as "acted with generall applause divers 
times by the Company of his Majesties Revells" (Murray, i. 2.79- 
81). He also contributed laudatory verses to Richards's play (ed. 
Skemp, p. 14): 

To his Friend Mr. Nathanael Richards, 
upon his Tragedy of M.essallina 

If it be good to write the truth of ill 
And Vertues excellence, 'tis in thy skill 
(Respected Friend) thy nimble Scenes discover 
Romes lust-burnt Emp'resse and her vertuous Mother 
So truly to the life; judgement may see, 
(Praysing this Peece) I doe not flatter thee. 
Men here may reade Heaven's Art to chastise Lust; 
Rich Vertue in a Play, so cleare; no rust. 
Bred by the squint ey'd critickes conquering breath 
Can e're deface it; Messalina's death 
Adds life unto the Stage; where though she die 
Defam'd; true justice crownes this Tragedy. 

Jo. Robinson. 

His burial is recorded at St. Giles's, Cripplegate, on April 17, 
1641 (Collier, iii. 478). 

ROBINSON, RICHARD. 

The earliest appearance of Richard Robinson is in the cast of 
Jonson's Catiline, acted by the King's men in 161 1. A stage-direc- 
tion in The Second Maiden s Tragedy (161 1) shows that he played 
the Lady: "Enter Ladye Rich Robinson" (ed. Greg, p. 61). In 
The Devil is an Ass (161 6), II. viii. 56-77, Jonson praises him for 
his success in impersonating women (ed. W. S. Johnson, p. 54): 

300 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Meere-craft. Why this is well! The clothes we 'haue now: 
But, where's this Lady? 
If we could get a witty boy, now, Ingine; 
That were an excellent cracke: I could instruct him, 
To the true height. For any thing takes this dottrel. 

Ingine. Why, Sir your best will be one o' the players! 

Mer. No, there's no trusting them. They'll talke on't. 
And tell their Poets. 

Ing. What if they doe? The iest will brooke the Stage. 
But, there be some of 'hem 
Are very honest lads. There's Dkke Robinson 
A very pretty fellow, and comes often 
To a Gentlemans chamber, a friend of mine. We had 
The merriest supper of it there, one night. 
The Gentlemans Land-lady invited him 
To 'a Gossips feast. Now, he Sir brought Dick Robinson, 
Drest like a Lawyers wife, amongst 'hem all; 
(I lent him cloathes) but, to see him behaue it; 
And lay the law; and carue; and drinke vnto 'hem; 
And then talke baudy: and send frolicks! o! 
It would haue burst your buttons, or not left you 
A seame. 

Mer. They say hee's an ingenious youth! 

Ing. O Sir! and dresses himselfe, the best! beyond 
Forty o' your very Ladies I 

Chambers QEliz.. Stage, ii. 336) suggests that he may have been 
the son of James Robinson Qq.v.'), and a member of the Children 
of the Chapel Royal at Blackfriars before joining the King's men. 
As a King's man (Murray, i. opp. lyx) he appears in the 16x3 
folio list of Shakespearean players; in the patent of March x/, 
1619; in the livery allowances of May 19, 1619, and April 7, i6ii; 
in the submission for playing The Spanish Viceroy without license, 
December xo, 162.4 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. xi); in King James's 
funeral procession on May 7, 16x5; in the license of June X4, 16x5 
QM.S.C, i. x8z); and in the livery allowance of May 6, 16x9. 
With this company he acted in the following plays (Murray, 
loc. cit.'): Bonduca (1613-14); The Double Marriage (c. 1619^x0); 
the Cardinal in The Duchess of Malfi (i6i9-x3), which part was 

301 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

formerly played by Henry Condell; The Wife for a Month (16x4); 
Aesopus, a player, in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed October 
II, 162.6); Count Orsinio in Carlell's Deserving Favorite (published 
in 1619); Lentulus in Massinger's Believe as You List (licensed 
May 7, 1 631; and La-Castre, in Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase (a re- 
vival, 163 1). Nicholas Tooley, in his will dated June 3, 16x3, 
bequeathed to Sara Burbage the sum of £2.9 13 j-. "which is owing 
unto me by Richard Robinson" (Collier, iii. 453). In 162.3 ^^ 
lived "att the vpper end of Shoreditch" (W a.lla.ce, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
347). He is alluded to in the dedication of Abraham Cowley's 
Love's Riddle, published in 1638 (Cowley, Works, i. 36): 

Nor has 't a part for Robinson, whom they 
At schoole, account essentiall to a Play. 

Davenport's poem, "Too Late to Call Back Yesterday" (1639), 
is dedicated "to my noble friends, Mr. Richard Robinson and 
Mr. Michael Bowyer" (Bullen, Old Plays, New Series, iii. 311). 
Wright in Historia Histrionica (1699) says that Robinson was a 
comedian at Blackfriars, that he had Charles Hart (^.f.) as his 
apprentice, and that he was killed at the taking of Basing House 
in October, 1645 (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 404, 406, 409). This last 
statement is evidently a mistake for William Robins C^.v.'), since 
in 1647 Richard Robinson joined his fellow-actors in dedicating 
the first folio of Beaumont and Fletcher's plays; and the burial 
of "Richard Robinson, a player" is recorded in the register of St. 
Anne's, Blackfriars, on March zt,, 1648 (Collier, iii. 479). He 
presumably married Richard Burbage's widow, Winifred, who 
appears as Mrs. Robinson in the Sharers' Papers of 1635 (Adams, 
Mod. Phil., xvii. 7 fF.); and the burial of "Winifred, the wyfe of 
Mr. Richard Robinson" is entered in the records of St. Leonard's, 
Shoreditch, on May x, 1641 (Stopes, Burbage, p. 140). The con- 
fusion of the names of Richard Robinson and William Robins was 
no doubt made easy by the fact that Robinson was the more 
popular of the two players. The mistake is incorporated in Scott's 
novel of Woodstock (i8x6), where Tomkins, knowing Harrison's 

301 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

fanatical fears, instructed Joceline how to play the part of "Dick 
Robison the player, whose ghost haunted Harrison." On January 
1.8, 1648, Robinson and other members of the King's company 
gave a bond to pay off an old Blackfriars debt to Michael Bowyer's 
heirs (Hotson, pp. 31-34). 

ROBINSON, THOMAS. 

Thomas Robinson is known as a player with Robert Reynolds's 
company in Germany. He perhaps acted female parts, for in the 
housing-list at Torgau in 16x7 he is called "Thomas die Jung- 
fraw." He accompanied Reynolds at Cologne in May, i6xS 
(Herz, pp. 31, 54). 

ROBINSON, WILLIAM. 
See William Robins. 

ROBSON, WILLIAM. 

See William Robins. 

ROBYN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 15 18. Some interesting cor- 
respondence of 1 5 18 informs us that Robyn was transferred from 
Wolsey's chapel to the Chapel Royal at the express desire of 
Henry VIII, who told Cornish to treat him honestly, not "other- 
wise than he doth his own." On April 1,1518, Richard Pace, secre- 
tary to Wolsey and Henry, wrote to Wolsey: "Cornsyche doth 
greatly laud and praise the child of your chapel sent hither, not 
only for his sure and clean singing, but also for his good and crafty 
descant" (Brewer, L. & P. Henry VIII, ii. x. pp. 12.46, 12.49, i2.5z). 

ROE, WILLIAM. 

A player with Robert Reynolds's company in Germany during 
1640 (Herz, p. 55). 

ROGERS, EDWARD. 

As a member of Queen Henrietta's company at the Cockpit in 
Drury Lane, Edward Rogers played Miliiscent, Cardona's 

303 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

daughter, in Shirley's Wedding (about May, i6i6), and Donusa, 
niece to Amurath, in Massinger's Renegado, printed in 1630 
(Murray, i. opp. 2.66'). 

ROGERS, WILLIAM. 

William Rogers's name appears in a warrant of June 30, i6z8, 
appointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94). 

ROLL, JOHN. 

John Roll (or Roo) was a Court Interluder in 1530 (Collier, i. 
115). He died in 1539 QEUi. Stage, ii. 80). 

RONNER, JOHN. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

ROO, JOHN. 
See John Roll. 

ROODS, JOHN. 

Part owner of the Fortune (Warner, p. 54). 

ROSE. 

Rose was apparently with Prince Henry's company in i6iz. 
On April 11, i6ix, Robert Browne wrote to Edward Alleyn on 
behalf of one Mr. Rose, "entertayned amongst the princes men," 
to request his help in procuring "a gathering place for his wife" 
(H.P., p. 63). 

ROSSETER, PHILIP. 

Philip Rosseter was a lessee of Whitefriars from about February, 

1609, to December X5, 161 4. He is named in a patent of January 4, 

1610, granted to the Children of the Queen's Revels. From March, 
1613, to March, 1614, he was associated with Henslowe in the 
management of the combined Revels and the Lady Elizabeth's 

304 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

companies at the Whitefriars, Swan, and Hope playhouses. On 
June 3, 161 5, he and others are recorded as patentees for the erec- 
tion of Porter's Hall playhouse in Blackfriars (Adams, Play- 
houses, pp. 3I7-X3, 330-3X5 341-47). On October 31, 1617, a 
license was granted to the Children of the Queen's Revels, under 
the leadership of Rosseter, Lee, Perry, and Long; they visited 
Norwich on August 19, i6ii8 (Murray, i. 361; ii. 345). He was 
one of the royal lutenists from 1604 to 16x3 (Elix.. Stage, ii. 337), 
and wrote some of the music for Thomas Campion's A Booke of 
Ayres (1601). On March i, 162.0, Campion bequeathed "all that 
he had unto Mr. Philip Rosseter, and wished that his estate had 
bin farr more." He died on May 5, 16x3 (D.N.B., xlix. z8x). 

ROSSILL. 

In / Henry IV, acted by the Chamberlain's men at the Theatre 
in 1597, Poins says in the course of a speech to the Prince (L ii. 
181): "FalstafF, Harvey, Rossill, and Gadshill shall rob those 
men that we have already waylaid." But in the scene of the rob- 
bery (IL ii) the characters here called Harvey and Rossill are 
discovered to be Bardolph and Peto, which led to Theobald's 
suggestion that Harvey and Rossill were the actors who took the 
parts of Bardolph and Peto. A. Gaw QP.M.L.A., xl. 531) regards 
Harvey and Rossill, not as actors but, as "ghost-names." 

ROWLAND. 

With the King's men, one Rowland seems to have acted Amil- 
car, Prusias, and a servant, in Massinger's Believe as You List (ed. 
Croker, pp. z6, 43, 49, 95), licensed May 7, 163 1 (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 33). 

ROWLEY, SAMUEL. 

Samuel Rowley, actor and playwright, belonged to the Ad- 
miral's company, and is first heard of, as a witness for Henslowe, 
on August 3, 1597. On November 16, 1598, he bound himself to 
play with Henslowe's company, the Admiral's men, at the Rose 

305 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(H.D., ii. 307). With the Admiral's players he acted Heraclius 
in Frederick and Basilea (1597); an unindentified part in Fortune's 
Tennis Qc. 1597-98); an ambassador in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 
1600-01); Ascalon in i Tamar Cam (i6ox), and Crymm in the pro- 
cession of the same play, appearing always as Sam (Greg, H.P., 
pp. 153, 154; R.F.S., i. 170; Chambers, Eli^.. Stage, ii. 175). 
About Christmas, 1603, the Admiral's men were taken into the 
service of Prince Henry. As a member of the Prince's company, 
Rowley is mentioned in the coronation list of March 15, 1604; 
in the patent of April 30, 1606; and in the household list of 1610 
(Elil. Stage, ii. 186, 187, 188). The Prince died in November, i6ii, 
and his troupe soon passed under the patronage of the Palsgrave. 
Rowley is named in the new patent of January 11, 161 3 (M.S.C., 
i. 2.jy); but he does not appear in subsequent lists of the Pals- 
grave's men. He wrote several plays alone and collaborated in 
others, the last of which was licensed on April 6, 16x4 (Eliz.. 
Stage, iii. 47x). He is perhaps the "Sam Rowley" referred to in 
Mercurius Fragmaticus, 1647 (Hotson, p. 15): "he [Hugh Peters, 
the famous divine] has a fine wit I can tell you, Sam Rowley and 
he were a Fylades, and Orestes, when he played a woman's part at 
the Curtaine Play-house, which is the reason his garbe is so 
emphaticall in the Pulpit." 

ROWLEY, THOMAS. 

With the Admiral's men Thomas Rowley appeared in the pro- 
cession of / Tamar Cam, acted in i6oi (H.P., p. 154). 

ROWLEY, WILLIAM. 

William Rowley, player and dramatist, was a member of 
Prince Charles's troupe from 1610 to 16x5. As a Prince's man he 
appears in the patent of March 30, 1610; in a warrant of March 
X9, 161 5, to come before the Privy Council for playing during 
Lent (M.S.C., i. 2.72., 371); in an agreement with Alleyn and 
Meade on March xo, 161 6 (Warner, p. 50); early in 161 9 as Plum- 
porridge in Middleton's Masque of Heroes (Works, vii. 2.06); and 

306 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in King James's funeral procession on May 7, 1615 (Murray, i. 
161, 137). He served as payee for performances at Court by Prince 
Charles's men from 1610 to 1615 (Steele, pp. 163, 164, 170, 173, 
180, 189). On May 18, 161 5, he is recorded at Norwich with the 
company (Murray, ii. 340). Although technically a Prince's man 
until the death of King James in 16x5, he appears as a King's man 
(Murray, i. opp. lyz') in the cast of The Maid in the Mill (16x3); 
in the submission for playing The Spanish Viceroy, without 
license, December xo, 16x4; and in the stage-directions of Love's 
Pilgrimage and The Chances, both plays conjecturally dated about 
16x4-15. He was involved in a lawsuit as a result of the perform- 
ance, probably by Prince Charles company, of Keep the Widow 
Waking at the Red Bull, 16x4 (Charles Sisson, "Keep the Widow 
Waking,'" The Library, N.S., viii, 19x7). He became definitely 
associated with the King's men in the patent of June X4, 16x5 
(M.S.C., i. x8x). This is the latest notice of his connection as an 
actor with any company. He dedicated his Search for Money (1609) 
to Thomas Hobbes C^.v."), is presumably the W. R, who contrib- 
uted a couplet on the death of Thomas Greene C^.v.^ to Greene's 
Tu Quoque (1614), and composed an elegy on his fellow-actor 
Hugh Attwell (jl-v^ in 16x1. He wrote plays for various com- 
panies (Eli%_. Stage, iii. 473-75)- From the documents connected 
with the lawsuit growing out of the performance of Keep the 
Widow Waking (The Library, N.S., viii, 19x7) we learn that he was 
dead before March X4, 16X5-X6; and Sisson notes that in the 
Parish Registers of St. James, Clerkenwell, is recorded the burial 
of "William Rowley, housekeeper" on February 11, 16X5-X6. 

RUSSELL, JOHN. 

John Russell was a gatherer for the Palsgrave's men, about 1617. 
He proved dishonest, as stated in an undated letter from William 
Bird to Edward Alleyn (H.P., p. 85): 

Sir there is one Jhon Russell, that by yowr apoyntment was 
made a gatherer with vs, but my fellowes finding often fake to 

307 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

vs, haue many tymes warnd him ffrom taking the box. And he 
as often, with moste damnable othes, hath vowde neuer to touch, 
yet not with standing his execrable othes, he hath taken the box, 
& many tymes moste vnconsionablye gatherd, for which we haue 
resolued he shall neuer more come to the doore; yet for your sake, 
he shall haue his wages, to be a nessessary atendaunt on the 
stage, and if he will pleasure himself and vs, to mend our gar- 
mentes, when he hath leysure, weele pay him for that to. J pray 
send vs word if this motion will satisfye you; for him his dis- 
honestye is such we knowe it will not. Thus yealding our selues 
in that & a farr greater matter to be comaunded by you J committ 
you to god. Your loving fFrend to comaund, 

W. BiRDE. 

He is doubtless identical with the person of the same name who 
occupied two rooms adjoining the Fortune, leased on June xo, 
1617 (H.F., pp. x8, 19), and to whom Alleyn paid £10 on August 
8, 1619, as a legacy from Agnes Henslowe (Warner, p. 181). 

RUTTER, WILLIAM. 

In 1503 William Rutter was a Court Interluder in the service of 
Henry VII (^EUz.. Stage, ii. 78). 

SACKVILLE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Sackville is named in a passport issued on February 10, 
159^, by the Lord Admiral, giving permission for a group of 
players under the leadership of Robert Browne to travel on the 
Continent (Cohn, p. xxix). He was at Arnhem, Netherlands, in 
I59Z, with a license from Prince Maurice of Orange-Nassau QElix.- 
Stage, ii. xrj^n.^. In August, 1592., the company presented Gammer 
Gurtons Needle and some of Marlowe's plays at the Frankfort 
autumn fair; again in 1593 Sackville is named in the Frankfort 
records of English players at the fair (Herz, pp. 10, 11). The 
company seems to have disbanded in 1593, and Sackville is not 
again traceable until 1597, when he appears in the records of 
Wolfenbiittel, the Court of Henry Julius, Duke of Brunswick- 
Wolfenbiittel. He is described as "Thomas Sackefiel, Princely 
servant at Wolfenbiittel, " and had a quarrel with another Eng- 

308 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

lish player, Edward Wakefield, in a Brunswick tavern (Cohn, 
pp. xxxiii-xxxv). He used the clown-name John Bouset (Herz, p. 
17). During 1597 he visited Nuremberg, Augsburg, Strassburg, 
and Frankfort. In 1601 he (called John Bouset) was expected to 
join his old leader Robert Browne for the Frankfort Easter fair. 
From i6oi to 1617 his name frequently appears in the Brunswick 
household accounts; on August 30, i6ox, he served as payee for 
the English actors. Subsequent entries show that he was con- 
cerned in transactions for the Court, and apparently continued in 
the service of the Duke, though not as a regular player. During 
this period, i6ox-i7, he was a merchant in Frankfort (Herz, pp. 
31-36), and must have prospered, as evidenced by Thomas Coryat 
in 1608, when he "hastily gobled up" the following observation 
at Frankfort (Crudities, ii. 190-91): 

The wealth that I sawe here was incredible, so great that it 
was unpossible for a man to conceive it in his minde that hath 
not first seene it with his bodily eies. The goodliest shew of ware 
that I sawe in all Franckford saving that of the Goldsmithes, 
was made by an Englishman one Thomas Sackfield a Dorsetshire- 
man, once a servant of my father, who went out of England but 
in a meane estate, but after he had spent a few yeares at the 
Duke of Brunswicks Court, hee so inriched himselfe of late, that 
his glittering shewe of ware in Franckford did farre excell all the 
Dutchmen, French, Italians, or whomsoever else. 

His autograph, dated February i, 1604, is found in an album of 
Johannes Cellarius of Nuremberg (Cohn, Shak. in Germany, 
Plate i, facsimiles). He died in 162.8, leaving a library of theology 
and English literature (Eliz,. Stage, ii. 177). 

SAM. 

The "b[oy?] Sam" in the plot of The Dead Man s Fortune (H.P., 
pp. 133, 151) has been rather doubtfully conjectured to be Samuel 
Gilburne Qq.v.'). The play was possibly acted by the Admiral's 
men at the Theatre about 1590 (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 136; Greg, R.E.S., 
i. 163). 

309 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SANDERS, WILLIAM. 

William Sanders is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December xj, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by 
the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as 
Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

SANDERSON, GEORGE. 

George Sanderson, described as servant to Lord Goring, is 
recorded at Coventry on January 9, 1640, with a company com- 
posed of players from various troupes. They received a payment 
of 48j-. id., under date of November 15, 1640 (Murray, ii. 51, 154). 

SANDERSON, GREGORY. 

Gregory Sanderson appears among the representatives of Queen 
Anne's London and provincial companies of players who attended 
her funeral on May 13, 1619 (Murray, i. 196-97). Chambers 
(Eli^. Stage, iii. ^71) suggests that he may be identical with one 
Sands who appears in a stage-direction (line 186), "Enter x 
Lords, Sands, Ellis," of Robert Daborne's Poor Mans Comfort 
(ed. Swaen, p. 382.), a play possibly acted by Queen Anne's men 
at the Cockpit in Drury Lane, about 1617. But there were also 
actors named James Sands and Thomas Sands. 

SANDS, JAMES. 

James Sands in 1605 was associated with the King's men as an 
apprentice to Augustine Phillips, who names him as a legatee in 
his will dated May 4, 1605 (Collier, Actors, p. 87): "I geve to 
James Sands, my apprentice, the some of fortye shillings, and a 
citterne, a bandore, and a lute, to be paid and delivered unto him 
at the expiration of his terme of yeres in his indenture of appren- 
ticehood." William Sly, also a King's man, by his will dated 
August 4, 1608, left him £40 (Collier, Actors, p. 157). A James 
Sands is traceable in the Southwark token-books of 1596, 1598, 
and i6ix (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 337). He may be identified with one 

310 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Sands who is mentioned in a stage-direction (line i86), "Enter i. 
Lords, Sands, Ellis," of Robert Daborne's Poor Mans Comfort 
(ed. Swaen, p. 38x), probably a play of Queen Anne's company 
at the Cockpit in Drury Lane, about 1617; but there was a player 
named Sanderson with the Queen's men in 1619 and possibly 
earlier. 

SANDS, THOMAS. 

Thomas Sands is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town (Murray, i. zyg-So). 

SANDT, BERNHARDT. 

Bernhardt Sandt visited Nuremberg in April, 1600, with a 
group of English players under the patronage of Maurice of Hesse 
(Herz, p. 38). 

SAUNDERS, WILLIAM. 

A member of the Chapel Royal, not later than 15 17 (Eli^. 
Stage, ii. xyw.). 

SAUSS, EVERHART. 

Everhart Sauss is recorded at Arnhem, Netherlands, in 159^, 
with a company of English actors under the leadership of Robert 
Browne, carrying a license from Prince Maurice, of Orange- 
Nassau (E/i^. Stage, ii. x.j^n.'). 

SAVAGE, JEROME. 

Jerome Savage appears to have been a member of the Earl of 
Warwick's company, from 1575 to 1579. With John and Lawrence 
Dutton he received payment for the two Court performances by 
that troupe during the Christmas season of 1575-76, on December 
2.-J, 1575, and January i, 2.576); and alone he was payee for a 
play scheduled to have been given at Court on February x, 
1579 (Steele, pp. 57, 58, 74). 

311 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SAVAGE, RAPE. 

Apparently "the successor of Aaron Holland [q.v.] and the 
purchaser of his property in the Red Bull" (Charles Sisson, 
"Keep the Widoiv Waking,'' The Library, N.S., viii, 19x7, pp. X35 fF.). 

SAVEREY, ABRAHAM. 

In the few notices we have of Saverey he is associated with 
Francis Henslowe in borrowing from Philip Henslowe and in 
giving bond for debts. He is described as "of Westminster, gent." 
on October 2.5, 1604, when he gave bond to Prancis Henslowe and 
James Browne as security for payment of £10 to Joshua Speed, 
for which they were jointly bound (Warner, p. 2.35). By March, 
1605, he belonged to the Lennox company. On March i, 1605, 
he gave Prancis Henslowe a power of attorney to recover £40 
from John Garland, forfeited on a bond "for the deliuere of a 
warrant, which was mayd vnto me from the gratious the duke of 
Linox"; and on March 16, 1605, Prancis gave his uncle a bond of 
£60 to observe an agreement that he had made with Garland 
and Saverey "his ffellowes, servantes to the most noble Prince 
the duke of Lennox." He acknowledged a debt of £1 to Philip 
Henslowe, payable on demand, March 11, 1606. There was an 
undated loan, probably in 1604, o^ £7 by Philip Henslowe to his 
nephew "to goyne with owld Garlland and Symcockes and 
Saverey when they played in the dukes nam at ther laste goinge 
owt" (H.D., i. i6o;ii. 308;^.?., pp. 6ifF.; Warner, pp. X7,z8,z9). 

SAVILL, ARTHUR. 

Arthur Savill played Quartilla, a gentlewoman, in Marmion's 
Holland's Leaguer, presented in December, 1631 (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 45), by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his servants, 
at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, Works, pp. i, 6). 

SCARLETT, JOHN. 

A player, whose son Richard was baptized at St. Giles's on 
September i and buried on September 19, 1605 QEliz. Stage, ii. 337). 

3ii 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SCARLETT, RICHARD. 

The registers of St. Giles's record the burial of Richard Scarlett, 
a player, on April xt,, 1609; the baptism of his daughter Susan, 
on February 11, 1607; the burial of his wife Marie, on February 
IX, 1607 QEliz- Stage^ ii. 337); and the burial of a son in 1607 
(Malcolm, Londinium Redivivum, iii. 303-04). 

SCHADLEUTNER, SEBASTIAN. 

In February, 16x3, Sebastian Schadleutner visited Nuremberg 
with John Spencer (Herz, p. 5X). 

SCOTT, JOHN. 

John Scott was a Court Interluder from 1503 to 15x8 (EUz.. 
Stage, ii. 78, 80). The unusual circumstances of his death are re- 
lated by a contemporary historian (Chronicle of the Grey Friars of 
London, ed. Nichols, p. 34): 

Also this same yere [15X8-X9] John Scotte, that was one of the 
kynges playeres, was put in Newgate for rebukynge of the 
shreffes, and was there a sennet, and at the last was ledde be- 
twene two of the offecers from Newgate thorrow London and 
soe to Newgat agayne, and then was delyveryd home to hys 
howse; but he toke soch a thowte that he dyde, for he went in 
hys shurte. 

SEABROOKE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Seabrooke's name appears in a warrant of July x, 16x9, 
appointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 95). 

SEBECK, HENRY. 

Henry Sebeck was leader of the Lady Elizabeth's men when 
they visited Norwich on June 7, 1617 (Murray, i. X53; ii. 344). 

SEHAIS, JEHAN. 

Jehan Sehais is known as an English player in Paris during 
May and June, 1598. On may X5, 1598, the Confreres de la Passion 

313 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

leased their theatre in Paris, the Hotel Bourgogne, to him 
(Soulie, Recherches sur Moliere, p. 153): 

1598, Z5 mai. — Bail fair par les maitres de ladite confrerie a 
"Jehan Sehais, comedien anglois, de la grande salle et theatre 
dudit hotel de Bourgogne, pour le temps, aux reservations, et 
moyennant les prix, charges, clauses et conditions portees par 
icelui" passe par devant Huart de Claude Nourel, notaires. 

On June 4, judgment was obtained against him: 

1598. 4 juin. — Sentence du Chatelet donnee au profit de ladite 
confrerie a I'encontre desdits comediens anglois, "tant pour 
raison du susdit bail que pour le droit d'un ecu par jour, jouant 
par lesdits Anglois ailleurs qu' audit hotel." 

Chambers (^Eliz- Sfage, ii. 338) suggests that Sehais is possibly to 
be identified with the John Shaa (or Shaw) who witnessed a pay- 
ment to Dekker by Henslowe for the Admiral's men on November 
X4, 1599 (H.D., ii. 309). 

SHAA, JOHN. 
See Jehan Sehais. 

SHAA, ROBERT. 
See Robert Shaw. 

SHAKERLEY, EDWARD. 

Edward Shakerley played Gazet, servant to Vitelli, in Mas- 
singer's Renegado, printed in 1630 as acted by Queen Henrietta's 
company at the Cockpit in Drury Lane (Murray, i. opp. 2.66). 
In 16x3 he lived "in Clarkenwell Close" (Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
347). Herbert granted him a Protection from Arrest on November 
X9, 162.4 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 75). 

SHAKESPEARE, EDMUND. 

Edmund Shakespeare, a player, and presumably the brother of 
the dramatist, was buried at St. Saviour's on December 31, 1607. 
The burial entry : ' 'Edmond Shakespeare, a player : in the church, ' ' 
is expanded in the monthly accounts: "Edmund Shakespeare, a 

314 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

player, buried in the church, with a forenoone knell of the great 
bell, 2.0S." (Collier, Actors, p. xiv; Adams, Shakespeare, pp. 395, 
446). 

SHAKESPEARE, EDWARD. 

The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records the burial of 
"Edward, sonne of Edward Shackspeere, Player: base borne," 
on August li, 1607 (Collier, Actors, p. xv). 

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) came to London about 1590. 
His early life in London is to a great extent a matter of conjecture; 
various theories have been advanced to fix his theatrical connec- 
tions and to explain his dual profession of actor and playwright. 
The pros and cons are legion, and are too well known to call for 
discussion in this brief sketch. One of the most plausible ex- 
planations of his first years in London seems to be that he became 
associated with the Earl of Pembroke's men, with whom he no 
doubt acted and for whom he certainly revised several plays 
(Adams, Shakespeare, pp. 131 ff.). The closing of the playhouses 
on account of the plague, the traveling of Pembroke's men in 
the provinces, and the resultant bankruptcy of the troupe led 
naturally to his period of non-dramatic composition during i59X- 
94. He joined the Chamberlain's company on its formation early 
in the summer of 1594, and for this famous organization (from 
1603 onwards, the King's men) his great dramas were written. 
On March 15, 1595, he served as joint-payee with Burbage and 
Kempe for two plays presented by the Chamberlain's men at 
Court on December z6 and x8, 1594. He is named in the patent 
granted to the King's men on May 19, 1603, and in the coronation 
list of March 15, 1604. As a player he appears in the 16x3 folio 
list of actors in his own plays, and in the casts of Every Man in his 
Humor (1598) and of Sejanus (1603). This is his last appearance 
in the cast of any play. For a discussion of the parts he is supposed 
to have assumed, see Adams, Shakespeare, pp. 4x4-17. As chief 

315 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

playwright for the King's men and as a prominent shareholder 
in the Globe and the Blackfriars syndicates, he was associated 
with that company until his death in 1616. 

SHAKSHAFTE, WILLIAM. 

Possibly William Shakshafte was in 15 81 a player in the ser- 
vicb of Alexander Houghton, of Lea, in Lancashire. On August 

3, 1581, Houghton wrote QEliz- Stage, i. x8o«.): "Yt ys my wyll 
that Thomas Houghton of Brynescoules my brother shall have 
all my instrumentes belonginge to mewsyckes and all maner of 
playe clothes yf he be mynded to keepe and doe keepe players. 
And yf he wyll not keppe and maynteyne playeres then yt ys my 
wyll that Sir Thomas Heskethe Knyghte shall haue the same 
instrumentes and playe clothes. And I moste hertelye requyre the 
said Syr Thomas to be fFrendlye unto Poke Gyllome and William 
Shakshafte now dwellynge with me and ether to take theyn unto 
his servyce or els to helpe theym to some good master." 

SHANBROOKE, JOHN. 

A player, who was buried at St. Giles's on September 17, 1618. 
The register also records his children from June 10, 1610, to June 

4, 1618 CEliZ- Stage, ii. 338). 

SHANCKE, JOHN. 
See John Shank. 

SHANK, JOHN. 

John Shank (or Shanks — and various other spellings) in the 
Sharers' Papers of 1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 314) de- 
scribes himself to the Earl of Pembroke, then Lord Chamberlain, 
as "beeing an old man in this quality [playing], who in his youth 
first served your noble father, and after that, the late Queene 
Elizabeth, then King James, and now his royall Majestye 
[Charles I]." We have no further record of his connection with 
Pembroke's and the Queen's men; but presumably CEliZ- Stage, 

316 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ii. 338) he refers to his association with the Pembroke troupe 
about 1597-1600 and Elizabeth's traveling company during the 
years to'ward the end of her reign. He does not mention his other 
theatrical connections; but we know from the records that he 
w^as a member of Prince Henry's troupe in 1610, when he appears 
in the household list of players, and of the Palsgrave's troupe on 
January 11, 1613, when his name is found in the license granted 
to the new company that passed under the patronage of the Pals- 
grave after the death of Prince Henry in November, i6ix (^Eli^. 
Stage, ii. 188; M.S.C., i. 2.75). He appears to have been a resident 
of Rochester Yard, Southwark, in 1605 (Rendle, Bankside, p. 
xxvi); but subsequently he lived in Golden Lane, in the parish of 
St. Giles's, Cripplegate (Collier, iii. 48i-83). The registers of St. 
Giles's contain records of his children and of his servants, be- 
tween 1 610 and 162.9. In these entries he is variously described as 
player and as gentleman, and, in one record that may not refer 
to him, as chandler. The parish records are as follow: an unnamed 
son (buried December 31, 1610), Elizabeth (baptized February 
10, i6ii), an unnamed daughter (buried March ix, 161 5), James 
(baptized August i, 1619), John, "sonne of John Shanckes, 
chandler" (baptized February 1., i6xi), Thomas (baptized Novem- 
ber 18, i6xi; buried December i, i6xi), Winifred (baptized Aug- 
ust 3, 16x3), a second Winifred (baptized May 19, i6i6; buried 
June 16, 16x9); Susan Rodes and Jane BufHngton, "servants to 
Mr. Shancke," were buried in 161 8 and i6iz; and Mrs. Sarah 
Dambrooke and Mrs. Mary an Porter, widows, were buried 
"from the house of John Shancke, gentleman," in 16x4. He 
joined the King's men between January 11, 161 3, when he is 
named in the license to the Palsgrave's troupe, and March xj, 
1 619, when his name occurs in the patent to the King's company 
(M.S.C., i. X75, x8o). Thereafter until his death in 1636 he was a 
King's player. He is mentioned (Murray, i. 161, opp. 17X) in the 
livery allowances of May 19, 1619, and April 7, 16x1; in the sub- 
mission for playing The Spanish Viceroy, w^ithout license, Decem- 

317 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ber 1.0, i6z/\ (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 2.1); in the list of players who 
took part in King James's funeral procession on May 7, 16x5; in 
the patent of June 7.4, 16x5 (^M.S.C, i. x8x); in the livery allow- 
ance of May 6, 16x9; and in the 16x3 folio list of Shakespearean 
actors. With the King's men he played in The Prophetess (162.x); 
in Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed November z^, 16x8); and 
Petella, a waiting-woman, in Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase, a. re- 
vival, 163 1 (Murray, i. opp. lyx). Wright in Historia Histrionica 
(1699) says that he was a comedian and played Sir Roger in The 
Scornful Lady, at Blackfriars, where Nicholas Burt Q^-v.') was his 
apprentice (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 404, 406). In the Sharers' Papers, 
1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 316), he says that he had 
"of his own purse supplyed the company for the service of his 
Majesty with boyes, as Thomas Pollard, John Thompson de- 
ceased (for whome hee payed £40), your suppliant haveing payd 
his part of £xoo for other boyes since his comming to the com- 
pany, John Honiman, Thomas Holcome and diverse others, and 
at this time maintaines three more for the sayd service." At the 
death of John Heminges in 1630, William Heminges inherited his 
father's interests in the Globe and the Blackfriars playhouses. 
Between 1633 ^^^ ^^35 Shank bought from William Heminges 
three shares in the Globe and two shares in the Blackfriars, 
paying for them £506. Several of his fellow-actors resented his 
purchase of these shares, and testified that the transactions had 
been surreptitious. This led to the petition of Benfield, Swanston, 
and Pollard to the Lord Chamberlain for the compulsory sale to 
them of shares held by the larger shareholders; and Shank was 
directed to transfer one share in each house to the petitioners. 
Subsequently he affirmed that "hee did make a proposition to his 
fellowes for satisfaccion, upon his assigening of his partes in the 
severall houses unto them; but they not onely refused to give 
satisfaccion, but restrained him from the stage." On August i, 
1635, the Lord Chamberlain ordered the proper authorities to 
"sett downe a proportionable and equitable summe of money to 

318 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

bee payd unto Shankes for the two partes which hee is to passe 
unto Benfield, Swanston, and Pollard, and to cause a finall agree- 
ment and conveyances to bee settled accordingly" (Adams, Mod. 
Phil., xvii. 7 fF.; Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 311-19). On 
March 16, 1614, Herbert licensed for the King's men a piece 
entitled ^'Shankes Ordinary, written by Shankes himself," which 
is not extant (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 2.7). This was presumably a 
jig. That he was noted for his jigs is shown by an allusion to him 
in William Heminges's Elegy on Randolph's Finger, written about 
i63o-3X (ed. G. C. M. Smith, p. 14): 

Rounce Roble hoble, he that wrote so byg, 
Bass for a ballad, lohn Shanke for a Jigg. 

Shank was also the author of a song, "Now Chrecht me save. 
Poor Irish knave," preserved at Oxford in Ashmolean MS. 38, 
art. 131 (Smith, Ibid., p. 2.6«.). Collier (H.E.D.P., iii. 483-85) 
quotes this song, entitled Shankes Song, from an imperfect copy, 
with interpolations from another exemplar, and characterizes it 
as "obviously intended to ridicule the unfortunate Irish papists 
on their condition and sufferings in England, as well as on the 
power and influence of their priesthood." Shank is also said to be 
mentioned in some verses, signed "W. Turner" and dated i66i, 
quoted by Collier (Ibid., iii. 481) from Turner s Dish of Lenten 
Stuff, or a Gallimaufry: 

That's the fat fool of the Curtain, 

And the lean fool of the Bull : 

Since Shancke did leave to sing his rhimes. 

He is counted but a gull : 

The players on the Bankside, 

The round Globe and the Swan, 

Will teach you idle tricks of love, 

But the Bull will play the man. 

The verses, if genuine, were apparently, as Collier suggests, 
originally written much earlier than i66x, at some date when the 
playhouses mentioned were occupied by more or less famous com- 

319 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

panics. The first edition of Turner's book was issued about 1612., 
and hence "the lean fool of the Bull" was probably Thomas 
Greene. The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records Shank's 
burial on January 2.y, 1636 (Collier, iii. 483). The John Shank of 
the Fortune playhouse may have been his son. 

SHANK, JOHN, "THE YOUNGER." 

John Shank, "the younger," is perhaps the son of the more 
celebrated comedian of the King's men, John Shank (j^.v.'), who 
died in January, 1636. He may fairly be identified with the John 
Shancke whose marriage to Elizabeth Martin is recorded in the 
register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, on January i6, 1630 (Collier, 
iii. 483). This conjecture is supported by the testimony of Tobias 
Lisle in a Chancery suit of 1647-49 concerning the non-payment 
of rent for shares in the Fortune playhouse. Lisle says that 

'about 9 yeares synce' he became assignee of a half-share in 
trust for Elizabeth Shanckes, his interest in which, at the request 
of the same Elizabeth and her husband, he afterwards made over 
to Winifred Shanckes" (Warner, p. Z46). And the date "about 9 
yeares synce" is in accord with a record that "John Shaunks, 
actor, of the Fortune playhouse, appeared and was sworn" by 
the Court of High Commission on February 8, 1640. This court 
on February 13, 1640, referred his case to Sir Nathaniel Brent, 
"to ascertain his income from the playhouse and otherwise, and 
out of his means to allot alimony to his wife" QS.P.D. Charles I, 
1640, pp. 393, 396). At an earlier date he was a member of the 
Red Bull company, as shown by a Norwich record. On June 6, 
1635, he and Richard Weekes were leaders of this troupe on a 
visit to that town (Murray, i. 2.74; ii. 357). Late in 1635 the Red 
Bull players moved to the Fortune, where they remained until 
about Easter, 1640 (Adams, Playhouses, pp. ^87-89); this accounts 
for Shank's appearance as a player at the Fortune in the records 
of the Court of High Commission, February, 1640. By December 
17, 1640, he was a member of Prince Charles's company, as evi- 

3x0 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

denced by a warrant of that date, appointing "John Shanke a 
Groom of the Chamber of the Prince in quality of Player" 
(Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 103). Doubtless he continued with this 
company, which occupied the Fortune from Easter, 1640, until 
the closing of the playhouses in September, i64i. Upon the out- 
break of war he seems to have joined the army of Parliament, 
and yet to have remained loyal to the King, as shown by The 
Perfect Diurnal, October Z4, iG^p- (Collier, iii. 485-86), which 
tells of "one Shanks, a player," who, with a Captain Wilson and 
a Lieutenant Whitney, deserted from the Parliamentary army 
rather than fight against the King's forces. Parliament ordered 
that "they should all three be committed to the Gatehouse, and 
brought to condign punishment, according to marshal law, for 
their base cowardliness." 

SHANKS, JOHN. 
See John Shank. 

SHARP, RICHARD. 

Richard Sharp is known as a member of the King's company 
from 1618 to 16x9 (Murray, i. opp. lyx). He acted in The Loyal 
Subject, licensed November 16, 161 8 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. ix); 
The Knight of the Malta (c. 161 8); The Mad Lover (c. 161 8); The 
Humorous Lieutenant (c. 161 9); the Duchess in The Duchess of Malfi 
(i6i9-X3); The Custom of the Country (c. i6i^-z6); The Double 
Marriage (c. i6i9-zo); Women Pleased (c. i6xo); The Little French 
Lawyer (c. 161.6); The False One (c. i62.o-xi); The Laws of Candy (c. 
16x1); The Island Princess (c. 162.1'); The Prophetess (i6zx); The 
Lover's Progress (16x3); Parthenius, Caesar's friend, in Massinger's 
Roman Actor (licensed October 11, 162.6); Ford's Lover s Melan- 
choly (licensed November 2.4, i6x8); Ferdinand, general of the 
army, in Massinger's Picture (licensed June 8, 16x9); and Lysander, 
in Carlell's Deserving Favorite (published in 16x9). He is also named 
in the submission for playing The Spanish Viceroy, without license, 
December xo, 16x4; in a Protection from Arrest granted by Her- 

^xi 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

bert, December X9, 1614 (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. zi, 75); in the 
list of players who took part in King James's funeral procession 
on May 7, 16x5 (Murray, i. 161); in the patent of June 14, 16x5 
QM.S.C, i. i8x); and in the livery allowance of May 6, 162.9. 

SHATTERELL, ROBERT. 

Wright tells us in Historia Histrionica (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 
404, 409) that Robert (?) Shatterell "was a boy . . . under 
Beeston at the Cockpit." At the closing of the playhouses in i6/[z 
and the beginning of Civil War, he enlisted in the King's army 
as quartermaster in Prince Rupert's regiment. After the Restora- 
tion he continued his career at the Cockpit. He is named in the 
Petition of the Cockpit Players on October 13, 1660, and in the 
Articles of Agreement between Herbert and Killigrew on June 
4, i66z (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 94, 96, 113-14). His Majesty's 
Company of Comedians opened their new playhouse, the Theatre 
Royal, on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, Diary, iii. 107), under the manage- 
ment of Thomas Killigrew. As a member of that organization 
Shatterell assumed the following parts in plays presented by the 
company (Downes, Ros. Ang., pp. 1. ff.): Voltore in The Fox, Sir 
John Daw in The Silent Woman, Calianax in The Maid's Tragedy, 
Bessus in King and no King, Charles's man in The Flder Brother, 
Poins in King Henry the Fourth, and Maskal, in The Mock Astrologer. 
On March 19, 1666, Pepys records that he went "behind stage" 
and was greatly amused by the "sights," including "Shotrell's" 
wardrobe (Diary, v. ^35). Downes (Ros. Ang., p. z) mentions also 
a William Shatterell, and Nicoll (Rest. Drama, p. Z69) an Edward 
Shatterell, in the lists of the King's company during the early 
years of the Restoration. A confusion in the names of the three — 
possibly only two — persons seems to have resulted; but Robert is 
apparently the actor who began his theatrical career before the 
closing of the playhouses in 164Z. 

SHAW, JOHN. 
See Jehan Sehais. 

3ZZ 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SHAW, ROBERT. 

Robert Shaw (or Shaa), with several of his fellows of the Earl 
of Pembroke's company, is a complainant in a lawsuit during 
1597 against Francis Langley, builder and owner of the Swan 
playhouse (Wallace, Eng. Sttidien, xliii. 340; Adams, Playhouses, 
pp. 168-74). ^^ ^ result of the dissolution of the company, caused 
by the production of The Isle of Dogs, Shaw bound himself to 
Henslowe to play with the Admiral's men at the Rose; on Oc- 
tober II his name is found in the company's accounts (H.D., i. 8i, 
2L02.). Thereafter until i6ox he appears in the Diary as authorizing 
payments on innumerable occasions, as borrowing money from 
Henslowe, as paying personal debts, as acknowledging company 
debts in the capacity of share-holder, and as a witness. He took a 
leading part in the business affairs of the troupe (H.D., ii. 309). 
During the Christmas seasons of 1597-98 and 1598-99 he served 
as joint-payee with Thomas Downton for performances at Court 
by the Earl of Nottingham's (Admiral's) men, and during 1599- 
1600 he was sole payee (Steele, pp. 113, 116, 118). As an Admiral's 
man he played an Irish bishop in The Battle of Alcazar, about 1600- 
01 (H.P., p. 153; EUx.- Stage, ii. 175). By February 7-13, i6oi, he 
and Richard Jones had left the Admiral's men, and the two had 
received £50 at their departure (H.D., i. 164). Worcester's men 
on September 19, i6ox, paid Shaw 16s., and on December 6, i6oi, 
£17 for four cloth cloaks. Also about this time the Admiral's 
men paid him £i for a play called The Four Sons of Aymon (H.D., 
i. 181, 185; ii. ^.XJ). The registers of St. Saviour's, Southwark, 
record the baptism of John, son of Robert Shaw, "player," on 
April ID, 1603, and the burial of Robert Shaw, "a man," on Sep- 
tember iz, 1603 Q^IK- Stage, ii. 339). This last entry in all prob- 
ability refers to the player, of whom nothing more is heard. 

SHEALDEN. 

A player, who witnessed a loan for Henslowe on August X4, 
i594(H.D.,i. 76). 

32-3 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SHEPARD. 

"Shepard that keepeth the door at playes" at Paul's is named 
as a legatee in the will of Sebastian Westcott, dated April 3, 
158^ (£//^. Stage, ii. i6«.). 

SHEPPARD, WILLIAM. 

A player, whose son Robert was baptized at St. Helen's on 
November x6, 1601. QEliz- Stage, ii. 339). 

SHERLOCK, WILLIAM. 

William Sherlock is named in the 16x2. Herbert list of the Lady 
Elizabeth's players (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). He seems to have 
become a member of Queen Henrietta's company at the Cockpit 
in Drury Lane at its formation soon after the accession of Charles 
I. With this organization he continued until 1637 (Murray, i. 
165-67), appearing as Lodam, a fat gentleman, in Shirley's 
Wedding (c. 161.6'); Brand in Davenport's King John and Matilda 
(c. 1619), where he "performed excellently well"; Mr. Ruffman, 
a swaggering gentleman, in Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, 
Part I (c. 1630); and as Maharaball and Prusias in Nabbes's 
Hannibal and Scipio (1635). At the reorganization of Queen Hen- 
rietta's men about October, 1637, he joined the Revels company 
at Salisbury Court, as shown by Herbert's record (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 66): "I disposed of Perkins, Sumner, Sherlock and Turner, 
to Salisbury Court, and joynd them with the best of that com- 
pany." He probably continued with this company, which re- 
tained the name of the Queen's players, until the closing of the 
playhouses in 1641. 

SIBTHORPE, EDWARD. 

Edward Sibthorpe owned one-half of one share in the syndicate 
that in 1608 leased the Whitefriars playhouse (Adams, Play- 
houses, pp. 313-15). 

3M 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SILVESTER. 

At Coventry on October i6, 16x5, one Silvester appeared with 
Martin Slater and William Robins as payees for the company 
known as the players to the late Queen Anne (Murray, i. 188; ii. 
i5o). 

SIMPSON, CHRISTOPHER. 

A shoemaker of Egton, Yorkshire, who appears as an unlicensed 
player and recusant in i6io-ii (Eli^. Stage, i. 305«.). 

SIMPSON, CUTHBERT. 

An unlicensed player and recusant, of Egton, Yorkshire, in 
1 61 6 (Eli^. Stage, i. 305«.). 

SIMPSON, JOHN. 

An unlicensed player and recusant, of Egton, Yorkshire, in 
1616 QEliz.. Stage, i. 305«.). 

SIMPSON, RICHARD. 

An unlicensed player and recusant, of Egton, Yorkshire, in 
1616 (EUz.. Stage, i. 305«.). 

SIMPSON, ROBERT. 

A shoemaker of Staythes, Yorkshire, who is mentioned as an 
unlicensed player and recusant in i6ii and 1616 (Eliz,. Stage, i. 
305«.). 

SINCKLER, WILLIAM. 

Elizabeth, daughter of William Sinckler, "a musitan," was 
baptized at St. Saviour's, Southwark, on September 6, 162.9 
(Bentley, T.L.S.^ Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). 

SINCKLO, JOHN. 
See John Sincler. 

SINCLAW. 

See John Sincler. 

32-5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SINCLER, JOHN. 

John Sincler (Sincklo or Sinklo) is first known in the plot of 2 
Seven Deadly Sins, acted by Strange's men about 1590. He appeared 
as a keeper in the Induction, a soldier in "Envy," a captain and 
a musician in "Sloth," and probably as Mercury in "Lechery" 
(Greg, H.F., p. i-^-l; R.E.S., i. x6x). During i59X-93 he was pos- 
sibly with Pembroke's men, for his name is found in a stage- 
direction of 5 Henry FI (III. i. i), 1613 folio: "Enter Sinklo, and 
Humfrey, with Crosse-bowes in their hands," which presumably 
refers to a production by Pembroke's men in i59z-93 or to a re- 
vival by the Chamberlain's men QElz^. Stage, ii. 1x9-30, 2.06). 
His name also slipped in as substitute for "Player" in the folio 
text of The Taming of the Shrew (Induction, 88): "Sincklo. I thinke 
'twas Soto that your honor meanes"; and here again this may 
point to a presentation by either the Pembroke or the Chamberlain 
organization (Eli^.- Stage, ii. 199, xoo). Thus we may with some 
reason assume that he was a Pembroke's man during i59X-93. 
Subsequently he joined the Chamberlain's troupe, probably at its 
formation in 1594. That he was a Chamberlain's man is shown by 
his appearance in a play acted by that company. He is found in a 
stage-direction of 2 Henry IV (V. iv. i), quarto of 1600: "Enter 
Sincklo and three or foure officers." When the Chamberlain's 
players passed under royal patronage in 1603 he became a King's 
man. In Marston's Malcontent (1604), he appears in the Induction 
(Works, i. 199). Probably he was only a hired man, for he is not 
mentioned in any of the formal lists of the company. After 1604 
nothing further is heard of him. He is discussed at length by A, 
Gaw (Anglia, xlix. x89-303), who suggests that he was a "thin 
actor," that in some cases his "thinness especially fitted him for 
the assigned part," and concludes that "he seems in general to 
have been an actor of no great power, not rising high in the com- 
pany throughout his connection with it, and used as a rule for 
supernumerary work or where . . . his physique rendered him 
useful for a certain effect." He is also considered by K. Elze 

32.6 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Notes on EUz.. Dram., pp. 163-64), who conjectures that he may 
be identical with one Sinclaw mentioned as a Court fool in the 
household books of the Emperor Maximilian II (1564-76): Elze 
writes: "Like many others of his fellows Sincklo may have gone 
to Germany when a young man; he may have been about Z5 years 
of age when he stood in the Emperor's service at Vienna about 
the year 1570." 

SINGER, JOHN. : 

John Singer became a member of Queen Elizabeth's troupe when 
it was first established in 1583, for he is named in a London record 
that gives the personnel of the company at this time (Eliz,. Stage, 
ii. 106). He was with the Queen's men at Norwich in June, 1583, 
when an affray occurred between the players and one Wynsdon 
and his servant (see John Bentley). Apparently he remained with 
the Queen's men, for he is mentioned in a document of June 30, 
1588, concerning the non-payment of subsidy by certain members 
of the company (M.S.C., i. 354). He may be identical with a John 
Singer who owed money in 1571 to Robert Betts, a deceased 
Canterbury painter; Betts had sold "certen playe-bookes" to 
William Fidge and one Whetstone, possibly actors (Plomer, 
Library, 1918, ix. X53). By the autumn of 1594 he had joined the 
Admiral's men, with whom he remained until 1603. He is named 
in Henslowe's first list of the company, December 14, 1594 (H.D., 
i. 5). He appears as joint-payee with Edward Alleyn and Richard 
Jones for the Court performances by the Admiral's men in De- 
cember and January, 1594-95 (Steele, p. 108). The Henslowe 
records show him as witnessing transactions, acknowledging 
company debts, borrowing various sums of money, and in one 
instance as authorizing a payment on behalf of the company. At 
some date after March 14, 1597, he and Thomas Towne borrowed 
40J-. from Henslowe "when they went into the countrey." On 
January 13, 1603, the Admiral's men paid him £5 "for his playe 
called Syngers vallentary." This is his last appearance in the 

3x7 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Diary (H.D., ii. 310). With the Admiral's company (H.P., p. 
154) he played Mauritius (?) in Fortune's Tennis (c. 1600) and 
Assinico in / Tamar Cam (1602.). He probably left the Admiral's 
men to become an ordinary Groom of the Chamber, which office 
he held at Queen Elizabeth's funeral in 1603 {Eliz,. Stage, i. 311). 
The register of St. Saviour's records the baptism of the following 
children of John Singer, "player": Thomas, August 7, 1597; 
William, June 17, 1599; John, September zi, 1600; Elizabeth, 
August 30, i6oi; Jane, May i, 1603. The token-books give his 
residence as "Awstens Rents" in 1597, 1598, 1599, 1601, and i6oi 
(Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). Collier has erroneously 
attributed the Quips upon Questions (1600) of Robert Armin (^.f.) 
to Singer. In 1600 he and Thomas Pope, of the Chamberlain's 
men, are mentioned by Samuel Rowlands in The Letting of Humours 
Blood in the Head-Vaine, Satire iv (Works, i. 63}: 

What meanes Singer then? 
And Fope the Clowne, to speake so Boorish, when 
They counterfaite the Clownes vpon the Stage? 

Dekker, in Gull's Horn-Book (1609), writes: "Tarleton, Kemp, nor 
Singer, nor all the litter of Fooles that now come drawling be- 
hinde them, never played the clownes more naturally then the 
arrantest Sot of you all shall." Heywood, in Apology for Actors 
(written after the death of William Sly in August, 1608, and 
published in 1612.), praises him with other dead actors whose 
"deserts yet live in the remembrance of many." John Taylor, in 
Taylors Feast (1638) gives an anecdote of him (Works, iii. 70): 

Amongst all these, I my selfe did know one Thomas Vincent 
that was a Book-keeper or prompter at the Globe play-house 
neere the Banck-end in Maid-lane: As also I did know lohn 
Singer, who playd the Clownes part at the Fortune-play-house in 
Golding Lane, these two men had such strange and different 
humours, that Vincent could not endure the sight or scent of a 
hot Loyne of Veale, and Singer did abhorre the smell of Aqua 
vitae: But it hapned that both these were invited to Dinner by a 
Widdow, (that did not well know their dyets) and as they sate 

3x8 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

at the Boord, a hot Loyne of Veale was set before Vincent, who 
presently began to change colour, and looke pale, and in a 
trembling manner, hee drop't in a swowne under the Table; the 
Widdow (being in a great amazement) made haste for an Aqua 
vitae bottle to revive him, which was no sooner opened, but the 
very scent sent Singer after Vincent in the like foolish traunce. 
But when the Veale and Aqua vitae were taken away, after a 
little time the men recover'd: Vincent went into another Roome, 
and dranke, and Singer call'd for the Veale, and din'd well with it. 

SINKLO, JOHN. 

See John Sincler. 

SKINNER, RICHARD. 

A Court Interluder from 1547 to about 1559 (Collier, i. 136, 
165; Elix.. Stage, ii. 8x, 83). 

SLATER, MARTIN. 

Martin Slater (or Slaughter) was a member of the Admiral's 
troupe from 1594 to 1597. He is named in Henslowe's first list of 
the company, December 14, 1594 (H.D., i. 5). He served as payee 
with Edward Alleyn for the Court performances by the Admiral's 
men in January and February, 1596 (Steele, pp. no, in). Various 
loans to him are recorded in the Henslowe accounts, where he is 
often referred to simply as Martin (H.D., ii. 310-11). With the 
Admiral's men he played Theodore in Frederick and Basilea, acted 
in 1597 (H.P., p. 153). He left the Admiral's company on July 
18, 1597, as shown by Henslowe's entry (H.D., i. 54): "Martin 
Slather went for [from] the company of my lord admeralles men 
the 18 of July 1597." On May 16, 1598, he sold for £8 the books 
of five old plays' to the Admiral's men, who had produced them 
some years earlier (H.D., i. 86, 90; ii. 311; Eliz.. Stage, ii. 167). 
He is presumably the Martin mentioned with Lawrence Fletcher 
(jq.v.^ in Scotland during 1599. He seems to have been associated 
with Fletcher at a time previous to their appearance in Scotland, 
for Henslowe records money "lent vnto Martyne to feache 
Fleacher" in October, 1596 (H.D., i. 45). How long he remained 

32-9 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

in Scotland is not known, but he was connected with the Earl of 
Hertford's players by January 6, 1603, as shown by a payment to 
him for a performance at Court by that company (Steele, p. 1x6). 
He was married; his wife received from Henslowe on July zx, 
1604, a loan of £5 on his behalf (H.D., i. 2.13). He was a member 
of a provincial company under the patronage of Queen Anne by 
March 7, 1606, when he is named in a patent, with Robert Lee 
and Roger Barfield (Eliz.. Stage, ii. i35). In 1608 he was manager 
of the Children of the King's Revels at the Whitefriars playhouse, 
and owned one whole share in the syndicate. An ensuing lawsuit 
describes him as a citizen and ironmonger of London, and refers 
to his family as being ten in number (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 315, 
317-18). Subsequently he returned to Queen Anne's provincial 
company. On July 16, 161 6, the Earl of Pembroke issued an order 
for the suppression of certain troupes traveling in the provinces 
under spurious licenses. Among others in this order are mentioned 
Thomas Swinnerton and Slater, who had separated themselves 
from the Queen's company and become leaders of "vagabonds 
and such idle persons" (Murray, ii. 343). About April, 1618, he 
is named as a Queen's man in a Letter of Assistance granting 
John Edmonds, Nathaniel Clay, and himself permission to play 
as "her Maiesties servants of her Royall Chamber of Bristol." 
Slater did not remain long with this troupe, which seems to have 
been taken under the King's patronage, and is next found with a 
provincial company in the Queen's service. Before December 6, 
1 61 8, he visited Ludlow as leader of "the Queenes Players" 
(Murray, ii. 5 fF., 15, 315). On May 13, 1619, he attended Queen 
Anne's funeral in London. After the death of the Queen, her 
provincial troupe was known as the players of the late Queen 
Anne. Slater continued as one of their leaders, and is traceable in 
provincial annals until 162.5. He is recorded at Coventry on De- 
cember i3, i6xo, and between January i4 and August 2.8, 162.3; at 
Leicester on October 15, 16x5; and at Coventry on October 16, 
16x5 (Murray, i. 188, 196, xo4, xo5; ii. Z48, X49, X50, 316). His 

330 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

name is found in the Southwark token-books from 1595 to i6o±; 
Martin Slawter, "a servant," was buried at this parish on August 
4, 16x5 QEliz- Stage, ii. 340). 

SLAUGHTER, MARTIN. 
See Martin Slater. 

SLAUGHTER, WILLIAM. 

A "ghost-name" evolved by Fleay (Drama, ii. 315-16) for a 
supposed member of Queen Elizabeth's company (Elix,. Stage, 
ii. io8«.). 

SLEE, JOHN. 

John Slee (or Slye) and three of his fellows who had been 
players to Queen Jane before her death in 1537 are mentioned 
about 1538 in a Chancery suit concerning the payments for a 
horse hired "to beare there playing garments" (Stopes, Shak. 
Env., p. 2.36). In 1539-40 he was a Court Interluder in the service 
of Henry VIII (Collier, i. 116; Eli^. Stage, ii. 79^., Sow.). 

SLEY, WILLIAM. 

See William Sly. 

SLY, WILLIAM. 

William Sly first appears as Porrex in "Envy" and as a lord in 
"Lechery" of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, acted by Strange's men about 
1590 (Greg, H.P., p. 151; R.E.S., i. i6z). On October 11, 1594, 
he bought from Henslowe "a Jewell of gowld seat with a whitte 
safer" for Sj-., to be paid for at the rate of is. weekly (H.D., i. 
X9). "Perowes sewt, which Wm Sley were" is mentioned in an 
inventory of theatrical apparel owned by the Admiral's men of 
March 13, 1598 (H.P., p. ixo). By 1598 he belonged to the 
Chamberlain's company, which he presumably joined at its 
formation in 1594. As a Chamberlain's man he appears in the 
actor-lists of Every Man in his Humor (1598) and of Every Man out 
of his Humor (1599). In 1603 the Chamberlain's men passed under 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

royal patronage; Sly is mentioned in the patent granted to the 
King's men on May 19, 1603 QM.S.C, i. x64), and he continued 
with this company until his death in 1608. He appears in the 16x3 
folio list of Shakespearean players; in the cast of Sejanus (1603); 
in the coronation list of March 15, 1604; in the Induction to The 
Malcontent (1604); and in the actor-list of Volpone (1605). Aug- 
ustine Phillips named him as an overseer, residuary executor, and 
legatee in his will dated May 4, 1605 (Collier, iii. 319). The 
Southwark token-books record a William Sly in Norman's Rents 
during 1588, in Horseshoe Court during 1593, and in Rose Alley 
during 1595 and 1596. The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, 
gives the baptism on September ^4 and the burial on October 4, 
1606, of John, son of William Sly, player, "base-borne on the 
body of Margaret Chambers." His own burial is recorded in the 
register of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, on August 16, 1608. He 
made a nuncupative will on August 4, 1608 (Collier, iii. 381-87; 
Variorum, iii. 476-78). He named Cuthbert Burbage and James 
Sands as legatees, but assigned most of his property to Robert 
and Sisely Browne and their daughter Jane. Robert Browne re- 
ceived Sly's interest in the Globe, and Sisely was appointed ex- 
ecutrix. The will was probated on August X4, notwithstanding 
that it had been witnessed only by several illiterate women and 
disputed by a kinsman named William Sly. Although not one of 
the original shareholders in the Globe, Sly was admitted to a 
share at some date after the death of Phillips in 1605 (Adams, 
Mod. Phil., xvii. 4; Wallace, N.U.S., x. 317). Early in August, 
1608, just a few days before he died, he had obtained a lease in 
the Second Blackfriars syndicate of a seventh share, which was 
surrendered by his executrix to Richard Burbage after Sly's death 
(Adams, Playhouses, pp. xx4, Z2.5«.). Heywood, Apology for 
Actors (i6ii), p. 43, praises his "deserts" with those of other 
dead players. 

SLYE, JOHN. 
See John Slee. 

332- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SLYE, THOMAS. 

Kempe was attended by "Thomas SI ye my Taberer" in his 
dance from London to Norwich (Nine Dates Wonder, ed. Dyce, 
p. 3). Perhaps Slye was regularly attached to Kempe in connection 
with the latter's clownage. Both men are pictured in the wood- 
cut prefixed to Nine Daies Wonder. 

SMITH, ANTHONY. 

Anthony Smith by March xo, 161 6, belonged to Prince Charles's 
men, and joined his fellows in signing an agreement with Alleyn 
and Meade (H.F., p. 91). On May 7, 1615, he took part in King 
James's funeral procession (Murray, i. 161, 2.37). Charles, soon 
after his accession, took his father's players under his patronage, 
and several members of the old Prince Charles's company were no 
doubt transferred to the King's men. William Rowley is the only 
one of the Prince's troupe mentioned in the King's men's license 
on June 2.4, 162.5; ^^^ Smith played Philargus, a rich miser, in 
Massinger's Roman Actor, licensed for the King's troupe on Octo- 
ber II, 1 6x6. The omission of his name from the 16x5 patent is 
not explained, but conceivably his transfer occurred about this 
time. As a King's man he appears in the cast of Ford's Lover s 
Melancholy , licensed November 1.^, i6z8; in the livery allowance 
of May 6, 16x9; and as Gerard, in Carlell's Deserving Favorite, 
published in 16x9 (Murray, i. opp. 172.). 

SMITH, JOHN. 

John Smith appears to have been a Court Interluder from about 
1547 to 1580, at an annual salary of £3 Gs. 8d., and an allowance 
for livery (Collier, i. 138, 138; Eli^. Stage, ii. 8i, 84; Murray, i. 
3, 4.). Perhaps he is to be identified with the John Smith who 
took the part of the "disard" or jester in the Christmas festivities 
of I55X-53, at the Court of Edward VI (Feuillerat, Edw. & 
Mary, pp. 89, 90, 97, 98, 119). 

333 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SMITH, JOHN. 

John Smith appears in the actor-list of Jonson's Efkoene, which, 
according to the folio of 1616, was "Acted in the yeere 1609, ^7 
the Children of her Maiesties Revells." 

SMITH, LEONARD. 

Leonard Smith and Jeremy Allen are recorded at Coventry on 
August 19, 1640, as members of an unnamed company of players. 
They received a payment of 2.0s. under date of November X5, 1640 
(Murray, ii. 154). 

SMITH, MATTHEW. 

Matthew Smith is named with Joseph Moore and Ellis Worth 
in a license granted to Prince Charles's men on December 7, 163 1 
(Murray, i. ii8). During the same month (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
p. 45) he acted with this company in Marmion's Holland's 
Leaguer, appearing as Agurtes, an impostor (Marmion, Works, 
pp. X, 6). His name occurs in a warrant of May 10, 1632., appoint- 
ing several of Prince Charles's men as Grooms of the Chamber 
(Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). He is mentioned in the Norwich 
records of February xi, 1638, when the company visited that 
town — but this does not necessarily indicate that he was present 
for the entry is a mere abstract of the 1 631 license (Murray, ii. 358) 

SMYGHT, WILLIAM. 

A player, who witnessed a loan from Philip to Francis Hen- 
slowe on June i, 1595 (H.D., i. 6; ii. 312.)- 

SNELLER, JAMES. 
See James Kneller. 

SOMERSETT, GEORGE. 

George Somersett was an Admiral's man about i6oo-oi. He 
acted with that company in The Battle of Alcazar Qc. 1600-01), 
appearing as attendant, fury, and Vinioso, and is presumably the 
George of the plots of Fortune's Tennis (c. 1597-98) and of / Tamar 

334 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Cam (i6ox), in the last of which he is noted as attendant, guard, 
captain, child, and (in the procession) as Cathayan (Greg, /f.F., 
pp. 153, 154; R.B.S., i. xyo; Chambers, Eli%,. Stage, ii. 175-76). 
The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records the burial on 
September 3, 16x4, of an unnamed son of John Wilson (^.f.), 
"from the house of George Sommerset, musitian" (Collier, 
Actors, p. xix). An undated and detached note mentions "a 
Staple for George Sommersetts Dore" (H.P., p. 150). 

SOTHERNE, DAVID. 

David Sotherne and three of his fellows who had been players 
to Queen Jane before her death in 1537 are mentioned about 1538 
in a Chancery suit concerning the payments for a horse hired "to 
beare there playing garments" (Stopes, Shak. Env., p. X36). 

SOULAS, JOSIAS DE. 
See Josias Floridor. 

SOUTHEY, THOMAS. 

A Court Interluder from 1547 to about 1556 (Collier, i. 136, 
165; Eli^. Stage, ii. 82., 83). 

SOUTHYN, ROBERT. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

SOYLES, WILLIAM. 

William Soyles is named in a Ticket of Privilege granted on 
January ix, 1636, to the attendants "employed by his Majesty's 
servants the players of the Blackfriars, and of special use to them 
both on the Stage and otherwise for his Majesty's disport and 
service" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 99). 

SPARKES, THOMAS. 

A joint-lessee of the new Fortune playhouse, in which he ob- 
tained a whole share on May xo, 16x2. (Warner, p. 146). 

335 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SPENCER, GABRIEL. 

Gabriel Spencer, with several of his fellows of the Earl of Pem- 
broke's company, is named as complainant in a lawsuit during 
1597 against Francis Langley, builder and owner of the Swan 
playhouse (Wallace, Eng. Studien, xliii. 340; Adams, Playhouses, 
pp. 168-74). ^^ is presumably the Gabriel mentioned in a stage- 
direction of the Folio 5 Henry VI (I. ii. 48), "Enter Gabriel," 
which possibly refers to a production by Pembroke's men in 
I59X-93 or to a revival by the Chamberlain's men (Elix.. Stage, 
ii. 1x9-30, xoo). This conjecture gives the possibility that he was 
a Chamberlain's man previous to his connection with Pembroke's 
men in 1597. As a result of the dissolution of Pembroke's company, 
caused by the production of The Isle of Dogs, Spencer joined the 
Admiral's men under Henslowe's management at the Rose; on 
October 11, 1597, his name is found in the company's accounts 
(H.D., i. 82.). He is recorded in various transactions with Hen- 
slowe, who sometimes refers to him simply as Gabriel. He ap- 
pears as a witness, as acknowledging company and personal debts, 
as borrowing money, and as making payments (H.D., ii. 312.-13). 
On May 19, 1598, he borrowed loj-. from Henslowe "to bye a 
plvme of feathers which his mane Bradshawe feched of me" (H. 
D., i. 79). This servant was probably Richard Bradshaw Cq.v.^, 
also a player. Spencer was killed by Ben Jonson with a three- 
shilling rapier in a duel on September 1.2., 1598 (JeafFreson, 
Middlesex, i. pp. xxxviii-xlii). The register of St. Leonard's, 
Shoreditch, records his burial on September x^, and gives his 
residence as Hogge Lane (Collier, Actors, p. xxii). On September 
x6 Henslowe wrote to Alleyn at the Brill in Sussex (H.P., p. 48): 
"Now to leat you vnderstand newes J will teall you some but yt 
is for me harde & heavey. Sence you weare with me J haue loste 
one of my company which hurteth me greatley, that is Gabrell, 
for he is slayen in Hogesdon fylldes by the hands of Bengemen 
Jonson bricklayer." The Middlesex records show that Spencer 
had himself previously slain one James Feake, who attacked him 

336 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

with a copper candlestick in the house of Richard Easte, a barber, 
in St. Leonard's. They fought on December 3, 1596; Feake died 
on December 6; and the coroner's inquisition is dated December 
ID Qeaffreson, i. pp. xlv, X34). Heywood, Apology for Actors 
(i6ii), p. 43, calls him "Gabriel" and praises his "deserts." 

SPENCER, JOHN. 

John Spencer ranks with Robert Browne as one of the most 
prominent leaders of English actors on the Continent. Nothing 
is heard of him in London or in provincial records; but he was 
active in the Netherlands and in Germany from 1605 to 162.3, and 
used the clown-name Hans Stockfisch (Cohn, pp. Ixxviii, Ixxxiii- 
Ixxxviii, xci-xcii; Herz, pp. 44-5^; Eliz- Stage, ii. x88-9z). He 
was apparently in the service of the Elector of Brandenburg dur- 
ing 1605, and visited Leyden in January and The Hague in May. 
His players then passed to the Elector of Saxony, at Dresden, 
where they seem to have remained for some time, and played at 
Cologne in April, 1608. For a time he was with the Duke of 
Stettin, then with the Elector of Brandenburg, and by July 14, 
1609, again with the Elector of Saxony, at Dresden, where his 
troupe continued about two years. In 1611 he again returned to 
the Elector of Brandenburg. His company visited Danzig and 
Konigsberg in July and August, and accompanied the Elector to 
Ortelsburg and Konigsberg in October and November, and during 
the following year, when the troupe numbered nineteen actors 
and sixteen musicians, gave a spectacular production, "The 
Turkish Triumph-comedy." Spencer's men visited Dresden in 
April, 1613; Nuremberg in June; Augsburg in July and August; 
Nuremberg again in September; Regensburg in October; and 
Heidelberg, where they spent the winter. They were at Frankfort 
for the Easter fair of 1614; at Strassburg from May to July; and 
at Augsburg in August. By February, 161 5, they came to Cologne, 
where all the players, besides Spencer's wife and children, were 
converted to Catholicism, as a result of the seductive oratory of 

337 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

a Franciscan friar. Spencer is next found at Strassburg in June and 
July, 1615, and at Frankfort for the autumn fair of the same year; 
he returned to Cologne during the winter of 161 5-1 6. By August, 
1 617, he was again with the Elector of Saxony at Dresden, and 
in the following year returned to the patronage of John Sigis- 
mund. Elector of Brandenburg, at Berlin. During 1618 the com- 
pany played at Elbing, Balge, and Konigsberg, under the leader- 
ship of "Hans Stockfisch." The troupe is recorded at Danzig in 
July, 1619. Sigismund died in December, 1619, and his successor. 
Elector George William, did not favor theatrical organizations. 
In 162.0 Hans Stockfisch petitioned for certain arrears in salary, 
but his claim was dismissed. As a result of the Elector's disfavor 
and the beginning of the Thirty Years' War, Spencer no doubt 
fared badly. He is not heard of again until February, 16x3, when 
he and Sebastian Schadleutner were refused permission to play at 
Nuremberg. Nothing further is known of him. The register of St. 
Saviour's, Southwark, records on June x6, 1603, the baptism of 
Elizabeth and Maudlin Spencer, daughters of John, "a musitian" 
(Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). 

SPENCER, WILLIAM. 

On February ^9, 1589, William Spencer and William Gascoigne 
served as payees for a performance at Court by the Admiral's men 
(Steele, p. 98). 

SQUIRE, LAWRENCE. 

Master of the Chapel Royal, 1486-93 (Wallace, Evolution, 
pp. i5 ff.). 

STAKHOUSE, ROGER. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1554 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. no). 

STEVENS, THOMAS. 

During 1586-87 Thomas Stevens was on the Continent. The 
Elsinore pay-roll records that he was in the Danish service from 

338 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

June 17 to September 18, 1586, and served as payee for the com- 
pany of actors. Soon he went to the Court of the Elector of 
Saxony, at Dresden, Germany, where he held an appointment as 
actor-entertainer until July 17, 1587 (Cohn, p. xxv; Riis, Century 
Maga-;(ine, Ixi. 391; Herz, p. 3). 

STOCKFISCH, HANS. 
See John Spencer. 

STOKEDALE, EDMUND. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

STONE, PHILIP. 

A lessee of a seventh part of the Red Bull playhouse. About 
1608-09 Thomas Swinnerton (^.^.) sold for £50 his interest in the 
playhouse to Philip Stone, who transferred the share to Thomas 
Woodford, about i6ix-i3 (Wallace, N.U.S., ix. ^91 fF.). 

STRATFORD, ROBERT. 

Robert Stratford played Triphoena, wife to Philautus, in 
Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, presented in December, 163 1 
(Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 45), by "the high and mighty Prince 
Charles his servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" 
(Marmion, Works, pp. 1., 6). 

STRATFORD, WILLIAM. 

William Stratford is named as one of Prince Henry's players in 
the household list of 1610 (Elii- Stage, ii. 188). The Prince died 
in November, i6ii, and his troupe soon passed under the patron- 
age of the Palsgrave. Stratford is mentioned in the new patent 
granted to the Palsgrave's company on January 11, 1613 (M.S.C., 
i. 2.-jy), and in the lease of the Fortune by the Palsgrave's men on 
October 31, 161 8 (H.P., p. 2.-f). In 162.3 ^e was still with the 
Palsgrave's company at the Fortune, and lived "att the vpper 

339 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

end of White Crosse Streete"; with Richard Claytone, Richard 
Grace, and Abraham Pedle, "all Actors at the fortune neere 
Golding lane," he was summoned to appear at court to answer a 
bill of complaint made by Gervase Markham (Wallace, Jahrbuch, 
xlvi. 348, 350). The register of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, records 
the burial of a William Stratford on August zj, 162.5 (Malcolm, 
Land. Rediv., iii. 304). On April 30, 16x4, he and others of the 
Palsgrave's men entered into a bond to Richard Gunnell, manager 
of the company (Hotson, pp. 52.-53). 

STRETCH, JOHN. 

John Stretch is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, when 
his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for permission 
to act in that town (Murray, i. x79-8o). 

STROWDEWIKE, EDMUND. 

A Court Interluder from about December X5, 1559, to his death 
on June 3, 1568 QEliz.. Stage, ii. 83, 84; Murray, i. 3). 

STURVILE, GEORGE. 
See George Stutfield. 

STUTFIELD, GEORGE. 

George Stutfield (Stutvile or Sturvile) appears as "Sturvile" 
in a warrant of May 10, 163X5 appointing several of Prince 
Charles's men as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
96). Under the name of Stutvile he is recorded at Norwich on 
March 10, 1635, when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, 
applied for permission to act in that town. As Stutfield he played 
a soldier and Bostar in Nabbes's Hannibal and Scipio, presented by 
Queen Henrietta's company in 1635 (Murray, i. opp. 1.66, 2.-j^- 
80). He is also mentioned in marginal notes to the plays in the 
British Museum Egerton MS. 1994. He apparently acted a "spir- 
rit" and a Triton in The Two Noble Ladies, a nobleman's son in 
Edmond Ironside, and probably a servant in Richard II (Boas, 
Library, 1917, viii. X3X, X33, 2.35). 

340 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

STUTVILE, GEORGE. 

See George Stutfield. 

SUDBOROUGH, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Sudbury. 

SUDBURY, THOMAS. 

Thomas Sudbury (or Sudborough) was a Court Interluder in 
1530. He died in 1546 (Collier, i. 115; Eliz- Stage, ii. 79«., 80). 

SUMNER, JOHN. 

John Sumner was probably with Queen Henrietta's company 
at the Cockpit in Drury Lane from its formation in 16x5 to its 
dissolution in 1637. As a Queen's man he played (Murray, i. opp. 
2.66) Marwood in Shirley's Wedding (c. i6i6); Young Bruce in 
Davenport's King John and Matilda (c. 16x9); the Duke of Florence 
in Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, Part II (c. 1630); Mustapha 
in Massinger's Renegado (pr. 1630); and Himulco, in Nabbes's 
Hannibal and Scifio (1635). From Wright's Historia Histrionica 
(1699) we learn that he was among the "eminent actors" listed 
as "of principal note at the Cockpit" (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406). 
At the reorganization of Queen Henrietta's men about October, 
1637, he joined the Revels company at Salisbury Court, as shown 
by Herbert's record (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 66): "I disposed of 
Perkins, Sumner, Sherlock and Turner, to Salisbury Court, and 
joynd them with the best of that company." He probably con- 
tinued with this troupe until the closing of the playhouses in 
i64i. Wright tells us that "Perkins and Sumner of the Cockpit 
kept house together at Clerkenwell, and were there buried . . . 
some years before the Restoration" (Hazlitt's Dodlsey, xv. 411- 
ix). Thus he may fairly be identified with the "Jno Sumpner" 
whose burial is recorded in the register of St. James, Clerkenwell, 
on September 18, 165 1 (Hovenden, iv. x88). 

SUMPNER, JOHN. 
See John Sumner. 

341 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

SUTTON, ROBERT. 

A London player in 1550, named in an order demanding that 
all plays be licensed by the King or his Council (Harrison, 
England, iv. 314). 

SWANSTON, ELLIARD. 

EUiard Swanston is first heard of as a member of the Lady 
Elizabeth's company in 16x2., when Herbert includes him among 
"the chiefe of them at the Phoenix" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). 
He had joined the King's men before December xo, 16x4, when he 
and others of the company signed a submission for playing The 
Spanish Viceroy without license (Adams, Ibid., p. xi). With the 
King's men he continued until the closing of the playhouses in 
164X. He took part in King James's funeral procession on May 7, 
16x5. As a player to King Charles he appears (Murray, i. 161, 
opp. lyx) in the patent of June X4, 16x5 (M.S.C., i. x8x); as 
Aretinus Clemens, Caesar's spy, in Massinger's Roman Actor 
(licensed October 11, 16x6); in the actor-list of Ford's Lover s 
Melancholy (licensed November X4, 16x8); as Ricardo, a wild 
courtier, in Massinger's Picture (licensed June 8, 16x9); as Count 
Utrante in Carlell's Deserving Favorite (published 16x9); as Chry- 
salus in Massinger's Believe as You List (licensed May 7, 163 1); 
and as Lugier, the rough and confident tutor, in Fletcher's Wild- 
goose Chase (a revival, 163 1). On October X4, 1633, he and Lowin 
craved the pardon of Herbert "for their ill manners" in acting an 
unexpurgated version of Fletcher's Woman s Pri^e, or the Tamer 
Tamed (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. xo ff".). Wright in Historia His- 
trionica (1699) tells us that before 164X Swanston played Othello 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 406). At some period in his career he played 
Bussy D' Ambois in Chapman's play of that name. He is supposed 
to be the "third man" referred to in the Prologue to the 1641 
edition of the play as undertaking the part of Bussy (Parrott, 
Trag. of Chapman, p. 3). His characterization of Ricardo in Mas- 
singer's Picture is perhaps also alluded to in the Prologue, "As 

34X 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Richard he was liked" (cf. Graves, Mod. Phil., xxiii. 3 fF.)- 
That he played Bussy is shown by Gayton, Pleasant Notes upon 
Don Quixot (1654), p. X5 : "Insomuch that our Emperour (having 
a spice of self-conceit before, was soundly peppered now) for he 
was instantly Metamorphoz'd into the stateliest, gravest and 
commanding soule, that ever eye beheld. Taylor acting Arbaces, 
or Swanston D'Amboys, were shadowes to him; his pace, his look, 
his voice, and all his garb was alter'd." He is named in the livery 
allowances of May 6, 162.9, April xx, 1637, March ix, 1639, and 
March zo, 1641 (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 95, 99, loi, 104). Before 
1635 he had one-third of a share in the Blackfriars syndicate, as 
shown by the testimony of Shank in 1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, 
Outlines, i. 314-15): "Mr. Swanston . . . who is most violent 
in this business . . . receaved this last yeere above £34 for the 
profitt of a third part of one part in the Blackfriers which hee 
bought for £1.0 . . . and yet hath injoyed the same two or three 
yeeres allready." After the petition in 1635 by him, Benfield, and 
Pollard, he acquired another third of a share in the Blackfriars 
and one whole share in the Globe (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 8; 
Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 313-14). From this time to the 
closing of the playhouses, he and Lowin and Taylor were the 
most important members of the King's company. They received 
payment for the Court performances from April xy, 1634, to 
March 1.0, 1641 (Steele, pp. Z44, X49, x6x, i-Gj, 2.-/^, 2.76'). In 1647 
he joined a group of the King's players in publishing the folio of 
Beaumont and Fletcher's plays; his name is appended to the 
dedicatory epistle (Works, i. p. x). Wright says of him: "I have 
not heard of one of these players of any note that sided with the 
other party [the Puritans], but only Swanston; and he professed 
himself a Presbyterian, took up the trade of a jeweller, and lived 
in Aldermanbury, within the territory of Father Calamy" (Haz- 
litt's Dodsley, xv. 409). This statement is in part confirmed by a 
pamphlet quoted by Collier (H.E.D.P., i. 488), A Key to the 
Cabinet of the Parliament (1648), where the writer asks: "What 

343 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

need is there of any playes? Will not these serve well enough, 
especially when they have gotten Hillyar Swansted, the player, 
to be one [a Puritan]?" In Thomas Shadwell's Virtuoso, acted ia 
1676, he and Taylor and Lowin are praised by Snarl, who admires 
nothing but the things of a former age (Works, i. 3x8): 

Miranda. Methinks, though all Pleasures have left you, you 
may go see Plays. 

Snarl. I am not such a Coxcomb, I thank God: I have seen 'em 
at Black-Fryers. Pox, they act like Poppets now, in Sadness. I, 
that have seen Joseph Taylor, and Lowen, and Swans fead ! Oh, a 
brave roaring Fellow, would make the House shake again! Be- 
sides, I can never endure to see Plays, since Women came on the 
Stage. Boys are better by half. 

Collier (H.E.D.P., iii. 43 7«.) says that the registers of Alderman- 
bury "contain many entries of the birth of his children, begin- 
ning in iGxL, and ending in 1638, after which date we hear no 
more of him in that parish." Leslie Hotson, in his Commonwealth 
and Restoration Stage (192.8), pp. 15, 73, gives more complete in- 
formation: Swanston's will was dated June 2.4, 1651; he died be- 
fore July 3 of that year, and is described as "Eylaeardt Swanston, 
of St. Mary Aldermanbury, London, gent." 

SWETHERTON, THOMAS. 
See Thomas Swinnerton. 

SWINNERTON, ABEL. 

Abel Swinnerton is named in a warrant of June 30, i6i8, ap- 
pointing several of the Lady Elizabeth's (Queen of Bohemia's) 
players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 94). 

SWINNERTON, THOMAS. 

Thomas Swinnerton (or Swetherton) was a member of Queen 
Anne's company from its formation late in 1603 or early in 1604. 
He took part in the coronation procession of March 15, 1604, 
and is named in both the license of April 15, 1609, and the dupli- 
cate patent granted to the traveling company on January 7, i6ii 

344 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(EltTi. Stage, ii. ■l2.<^; M.S.C, i. xyo; Murray, ii. 343). In 1605 he 
was lessee of a share, or a seventh part, of the Red Bull playhouse, 
presumably at that time occupied by the Queen's men. The lease 
entitled him also to a gatherer's place. Some three years later 
he sold his interest to one Philip Stone for £50 (Wallace, N.U.S., 
ix. X94). Swinnerton was an active leader of the Queen's provin- 
cial company. He is recorded in the Norwich accounts on April 
18, 1614, May 6, 1615, March 30, 1616, May 2.9, 1616, and May 
31, 1 617. Previous to this last appearance in Norwich, the Earl 
of Pembroke had issued an order on July 16, 161 6, for the sup- 
pression of certain provincial troupes that were using question- 
able licenses. Among others in this order are mentioned Swinner- 
ton and Martin Slater, who are said to have separated themselves 
from the Queen's company and become leaders of "vagabonds 
and such idle persons." On May 13, 1619, he attended Queen 
Anne's funeral in London. After the death of the Queen, her 
provincial troupe was known as the players to the late Queen 
Anne. Under Swinnerton's leadership the players visited Leicester 
in 1619 and Coventry on March 2.9, i6io (Murray, i. 191, i^x, 
103-04; ii. 148, 313, 340, 341, 343). On March 16, 16x5, Herbert 
granted a license to Swinnerton, Ellis Guest, and Arthur Grimes. 
They were in Leicester on March 6, i6x6. Swinnerton is not men- 
tioned in the company's new license of June 7, 162.S, by which 
date he had apparently organized a troupe under his own manage- 
ment. He appears as the leader of such a company at Norwich on 
July 19, i6i8, and at Leicester during the same year (Murray, ii. 
loi, loi, 105, 316, 317, 371). This is the last we hear of him. 

SYFERWESTE, RICHARD. 

On September 4, 1602., Richard Syferweste borrowed money 
from Henslowe "to ride downe to his felowes," who were pre- 
sumably in the country. Richard Perkins, of Worcester's men, is 
mentioned in the same entry, which would suggest that Syfer- 
weste was also a member of Worcester's company. But Wor- 

345 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

cester's players were not on a tour at this time, for they were 
acting at the Rose (H.D., i. 178; ii. 314). 

SYMCOCKES. 

The Henslowe accounts show that one Symcockes was a mem- 
ber of the Duke of Lennox's company of players about 1604-05. 
There was an undated loan of £7 by Philip to Francis Henslowe 
"to goyne with owld Garlland and Symcockes and Saverey when 
they played in the duckes nam at ther laste goinge owt" (H.D., 
i. 160; ii. 314). The loan may be safely dated about 1604-05, for 
the other players concerned in the transactions are found during 
this period in other notices of Lennox's men. 

SYMONS, JOHN. 

John Symons was a tumbler. He served as payee for feats of 
activity and tumbling by Strange's men at Court on January i, 
1583. He appeared again at Court with feats of activity and 
vaulting on January i, 1585, when the Earl of Oxford was his 
patron. By January 9, 1586, he had returned to Lord Strange's 
patronage, and was giving exhibitions at Court. He is again re- 
corded at Court on December x8, 1587, presumably as a member of 
Strange's company. On December 2.9, 1588, and February 11, 1599, 
he seems to have been at Court with the Admiral's men, who were 
paid for activities and plays, and the Revels accounts for 1587-89 
record "a paire of fflannell hose for Symmons the Tumbler." This 
connection, as in the other instances, was apparently only tempo- 
rary, for the Nottingham accounts for 1588-89 record a payment 
of 2.0J-. to "Symons and his companie, beinge theQuenes players" 
(Elix.. Stage, ii. 119; iv. 159, i6i, i6z; Murray, ii. 375). 

« 

T., R. 

With the King's men in 1619, R. T., an unindentified actor or 
stage-attendant, played five minor parts in Sir John van Olden 
Barnavelt (ed. Frijlinck, p. clx): an officer, a provost, a servant, 
a huntsman, and a messenger. 

346 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TAILOR, ROBERT. 

Robert Tailor belonged to the Admiral's men about 15 97-1601. 
He acted with them in Fortune's Tennis about 1597-98, and appears 
as an attendant, a fury, and as Jonas in The Battle of Alcazar, 
about 1600-01 (Greg, H.F., pp. 153, 154; R.E.S., i. ^70; Cham- 
bers, Elix.. Stage, ii. 175-76). 

TARBOCK, JOHN. 

John Tarbock was a patentee for the Children of the Queen's 
Revels at Whitefriars, on January 4, 1610 (Adams, Playhouses, 
p. 318). 

TARLTON, RICHARD. 

Richard Tarlton, doubtless the most popular Elizabethan 
comedian, is said (Fuller, Worthies, ii. 311) to have been born at 
Condover in Shropshire, where "he was in the field, keeping his 
Father's Swine, when a Servant of Robert Earl of Leicester . . . 
was so highly pleased with his haffy unha^-py answers, that he 
brought him to Court, where he became the most famous Jester 
to Queen Elizabeth." Another account of his early life is given 
by his fellow-actor Robert Wilson in The Three Lords and Three 
Ladies of London, published in 1590 (Hazlitt's Dodsley, vi. 396-98): 

Simplicity. Thou wast the more fool. If thou cannot read, I'll 
tell thee. This is Tarlton's picture. Didst thou never know 
Tarlton? 

Will. No: what was that Tarlton? I never knew him. 

Simplicity. What was he? A prentice in his youth of this hon- 
ourable city, God be with him. When he was young, he was 
leaning to the trade that my wife useth now, and I have used, 
vide lice shirt [videlicet] water-bearing. I-wis, he hath toss'd a 
tankard in Cornhill ere now: if thou knew'st him not, I will not 
call thee ingram [ignorant]; but if thou knewest not him, thou 
knowest nobody. I warrant, here's two crackropes knew him. 

Wit. I dwelt with him. 

Simplicity. Didst thou? now, give me thy hand: I love thee the 
better. 

Will. And I, too, sometime. 

347 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Simplicity. You, child! did you dwell with him sometime? 
Wit dwelt with him, indeed, as appeared by his rhyme, 
And served him well; and Will was with him now and then. 
But, soft, thy name is Wealth; I think in earnest he was little 
acquainted with thee. 

O' it was a fine fellow, as e'er was born: 
There will never come his like, while the earth can corn. 
O passing fine Tarlton! I would thou hadst lived yet. 
Wealth. He might have some, but thou showest small wit. 

There is no such fineness in the picture that I see. 
Simplicity. Thou art no Cinque-Port man; thou art not wit-free. 
The fineness was within, for without he was plain; 
But it was the merriest fellow, and had such jests in store 
That, if thou hadst seen him, thou would'st have laughed 
thy heart sore. 

Whatever his origin, the earliest notice of him is the "Qd. 
Richard Tarlton" at the end of a ballad entitled: A very lamentable 
and Wofull Discours of the fierce fluds whiche lately flowed in Bedford- 
shire, in Lincolnshire, and in many other places, with the great losses of 
sheep and other cattel, the / of October, j^yo (Arber, i. 440). The 
ballad is reprinted by Halliwell-Phillipps, Tarlton' s Jests, p. ix6, 
and by Collier, Old Ballads, p. 78. Stow (^Annales, ed. Howes, 
1 63 1, p. 667) gives an account of the "terrible tempest of wind 
and raine" on October 5, 1570. Tarlton's ballad on the floods 
consists of thirty-six stanzas, of which the first two may be taken 
as representative: 

All faithful harts come waile. 

Com rent your garments gay, 
Els nothing can prevaile 

To turn Gods wrath away. 

Of waters fierce and fel. 

And fluds both huge and hie. 
You may report and tel 

Of places far and nye. 

The Stationers' Registers accredit him with other pieces, which 
are not extant: 1576, "a newe booke in Englishe verse intituled 

348 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Tarltons Toyes" (Arber, ii. 306); 1578, "Tarltons Tragical 
Treatises conteyninge sundrie Discourses and pretie conceiptes 
bothe in prose and verse" (Arber, ii. 3x3); and 1579, "Tarltons 
Devise upon this vnlooked for great snowe" (Arber, ii. 346). 
Also attributed to him is Tarltons Jigge of a horse hade of Fooles 
(c. 1579), taken from a manuscript in Collier's possession (Col- 
lier, New Facts, p. 18; Halliwell-Phillipps, Jests, p. xx); the jig, 
however, may be regarded as one of Collier's fabrications. The 
first reference to him as a player occurs about 1579 in The Letter- 
Book of Gabriel Harvey (ed. E. J. L. Scott, p. 67), where he is men- 
tioned with Robert Wilson in terms that suggest he was already 
conspicuous as an actor: "Howe peremptorily ye have preiudishd 
my good name for ever in thrustinge me thus on the stage to make 
tryall of my extemporall faculty, and to play Wylsons or Tarle- 
tons parte." He became associated with Queen Elizabeth's men 
when the troupe was first organized in 1583; he is named in a 
London record that gives the personnel of the company at this 
time QEliZ- Stage, ii. 106); and he continued as the talented and 
popular comedian of the Queen's company until his death in 1588. 
Howes (continuation of Stow's Annales, 1631, p. 698) speaks of 
Tarlton and Wilson as "two rare men" of the Queen's players, 
and says that "for a wondrous plentifuU pleasant extemporall 
wit," Tarlton was "the wonder of his time." He was with the 
Queen's men at Norwich in June, 1583, when an affray occurred 
between the players and one Wynsdon and his servant (see John 
Bentiey). There seems to be no likelihood that he is identical 
with "one Tarlton" whose house in Paris Garden about 1585 was 
under suspicion as a resort of papists (Wright, Elizabeth, ii. X5o). 
He is named in a document of June 30, 1588, concerning the non- 
payment of subsidy by certain members of the Queen's company 
(M.S.C., i. 354). His popularity as a comedian was supplemented 
by his fame as a playwright. For the Queen's players he wrote in 
1585 The Seven Deadly Sins, a comedy that attained very great 
popularity. Evidence of Tarlton's authorship is given by Gabriel 

349 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Harvey, Four Letters (1591), who, after telling an anecdote 
(Works, i. 194) concerning Tarlton, says that Nashe's Pierce 
Penilesse Ci59x) is — 

not Dunsically botched-vp, but right-formally conueied, ac- 
cording to the stile, and tenour of Tarletons president, his famous 
play of the seauen Deadly sinnes: which most-deadly, but most 
liuely playe, I might haue seene in London : and was verie gently 
inuited thereunto at Oxford, by Tarleton himselfe, of whome I 
merrily demaunding, which of the seauen, was his owne deadlie 
sinne, he bluntly aunswered after this manner: By God, the sinne 
of other Gentlemen, Lechery. Oh but that, M. Tarleton, is not 
your part vpon the stage: you are too-blame, that dissemble with 
the world, & haue one part for your frends pleasure, an other for 
your owne. I am somewhat of Doctor Pernes religion, quoth he: 
and abruptlie tooke his leaue. 

In Strange Newes (1592.), Nashe alludes to Harvey's charge of 
plagiarism, and thus strengthens the indication that Tarlton was 
the author of the play (Works, i. 304): "Haue I imitated Tarltons 
play of the seauen deadly sinnes in my plot of Pierce Penilesse?" 
He was a great favorite with royalty and nobility. Fuller (Wor- 
thies, ii. 3ix) says: "Our Tarlton was master of his Faculty. 
When Queen Elizabeth was serious (I dare not say sullen) and out 
oi good humour, he could un-dumfish her at his pleasure. Her high- 
est Favorites would, in some cases, go to Tarleton before they 
would go to the Queen, and he was their Usher to prepare their 
advantagious access unto Her. In a word. He told the Queen more of 
her faults than most of her Chaplains, and cured her Melancholy 
better than all of her Physicians." That he carried his privilege too 
far and incurred the displeasure of the Queen is shown by an 
anecdote related by Bohun, Eli%aheth, p. 352. (Disraeli, Amenities, 
p. 595; Halliwell-Phillipps, Jests, p. xxix): 

At supper she [Queen Elizabeth] would divert herself with her 
friends and attendance; and if they made her no answer, she would 
put them upon mirth and pleasant discourse with great civility. 
She would then also admit Tarleton, a famous comedian and a 
pleasant talker, and other such like men, to divert her with 

350 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

stories of the town, and the common jests, or accidents; but so 
that they kept within the bounds of modesty and chastity. In 
the winter-time, after supper, she would some time hear a song, 
or a lesson or two plaid upon the lute; but she would be much 
offended if there was any rudeness to any person, any reproach 
or licentious reflections used. Tarlton, who was then the best 
comedian in England, had made a pleasant play, and when it was 
acting before the Queen, he pointed at Sir Walter Rawleigh, and 
said: See, the Knave commands the Queen; for which he was 
corrected by a frown from the Queen; yet he had the confidence 
to add that he was of too much and too intolerable a power; and 
going on with the same liberty, he reflected on the over-great 
power and riches of the Earl of Leicester, which was so uni- 
versally applauded by all that were present, that she thought fit 
for the present to bear these reflections with a seeming uncon- 
cernedness. But yet she was so offended, that she forbad Tarleton, 
and all her jesters from coming near her table, being inwardly 
displeased with this impudent and unseasonable liberty. 

He was also skilled in fencing, as evedenced by the record on 
October i.^,, 1587, when "Mr. Tarlton, ordenary grome off her 
majestes chamber," was admitted to the degree of Master of Fence 
(Halliwell-Phillipps, Jesfs, p. xi). This title was then highly 
regarded; accoding to The Mountebank's Masque (Marston, 
Works, iii. 4x9), "A Master of Fence is more honourable than a 
Master of Arts; for good fightin was before good writing." 
A scrap of paper QS.P.D. Eli:^^., ccxv. 89) records "How Tarlton 
played the God Lutz with a flitch of bacon at his back, and how 
the Queen bade them take away the knave for making her laugh 
so excessively, as he fought against her little dog, Perrico de 
Faldas, with his sword and long staffe, and bade the Queen take 
off her mastie; and what my Lord Sussex and Tarlton said to one 
another. The three things that make a woman lovely." Tarlton 
made his will, died, and was buried at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, 
on September 3, 1588. His will (Halliwell-Phillipps, Jests, pp. 
xiii-xv), which describes him as "one of the Gromes of the 
Quenes Majesties chamber," leaves his property to his son 
Philip, and appoints as guardians for the boy Tarlton's mother, 

351 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Katharine, then a widow, his friend Robert Adams, and his fellow 
William Johnson. Soon after Tarlton's death a dispute arose as to 
the disposition of his property QEliz.- Stage, ii. 343; D.N.B., Iv. 
370). Katharine Tarlton alleged that her son had been unduly- 
influenced in assigning £700 in property to Robert Adams, ap- 
parently a lawyer, and had made a second will. Another record 
CS.P.D. Eli^., ccxv. 90) shows that Tarlton had addressed a 
death-bed petition to Walsingham, imploring him to see that 
his mother and six-year-old son Philip, godson of Philip Sidney, 
are not defrauded by "a sly fellow, one Mr. Adams." The Sta- 
tioners' Registers record after Tarlton's death several pieces 
either purporting to have been written by him, or taking ad- 
vantage of his popularity to increase their sale: 1588, "a ballad 
intituled Tarltons Farewell" (Arber, ii. 500); 1589, "a sorrowful! 
newe sonnette, intituled Tarltons Recantacon vppon this theame 
gyven him by a gentleman at the Bel savage without Ludgate 
(nowe or ells never) beinge the laste theame he sange" (Arber, 
ii. 52.6); 1589, "Tarltons repentance of his farewell to his frendes 
in his sicknes a little before his deathe" (Arber, ii. 531); and 1590, 
"a pleasant Dyttye Dialogue wise betwene Tarltons ghost and 
Robyn Good Fellowe" (Arber, ii. 559). The first, Tarltons Fare- 
well, is perhaps to be identified with "A pretie new ballad, 
intituled Willie and Peggie, to the tune of Tarlton's Carroll" 
QArchiv, cxiv. 341; Shirhurn Ballads, ed. Clark, p. 351). Although 
the ballad ends "quod Richard Tarlton," it is evidently a lament 
over the famous comedian under the pseudonym of Willie. This 
evidence supports the theory (Notes and Queries, 1885, xi. 417; 
Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, ii. 394) that Tarlton is "Our pleas- 
ant Willy" mentioned by Spenser, Teares of the Muses (15 91). 

Our pleasant Willy, ah! is dead of late: 
With whom all joy and jolly meriment 
Is also deaded, and in dolour drent. 

His "caroll" is again alluded to in "A proper new ballade wherin 

352- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

is plaine to be seene, how god blesseth England for love of our 
Queene: Soung to the tune of Tarletons caroll" QArchiv, cxiv. 
344). Another ballad, signed R. T., is also accredited to Tarlton 
(Huth, Ancient Ballads, pp. Iv, 377): "A prettie newe Ballad, 
intytuled: The Crowe sits upon the wall. Please one and please 
all." Soon after his death appeared Tarltons Newes out of Furga- 
torie. Onelye such a jest as his Jigge, fit for Gentlemen to laugh at an 
houre, &c. Fublished by an old companion of his, Robin Goodfellow. 
The quarto has no date, but the entry in the Stationers' Registers 
is dated June i6, 1590 (Arber, ii. 553). The author explains that, 
withdrawing from the crowded playhouse for a walk in the 
fields, he fell asleep and was visited by Tarlton' s ghost, which 
described Purgatory, and related eight stories to account for the 
punishment of those confined there. The tales are picaresque in 
nature, and are based chiefly upon Boccaccio. The writer declares 
that Tarlton "was only superficially seene in learning, having no 
more but a bare insight into the Latin tung," and describes him 
as "one attired in russet, with a buttond cap on his head, a great 
bag by his side, and a strong bat in his hand" (ed. Halliwell-Phil- 
lipps, pp. 53, 54). In 1590 appeared an answer entitled: The Cobler 
of Caunterburie , or an Invective against Tarltons Newes out- of F ur ga- 
tor ie. A merrier jest then a clownes Jigge, and fitter for Gentlemens 
humors, which is another collection of tales. A description of 
Tarlton, quite similar to that given in Tarltons Newes, is found in 
Henry Chettle's Kind-Heart' s Dream (15 91), where the author, 
feigning a dream, says he recognized Tarlton's ghost "by his 
sute of russet, his buttond cap, his taber, his standing on the toe, 
and other tricks." Chettle puts into his mouth a defense of plays 
and a diatribe on landlords, under the heading: "To all Maligners 
of Honest Mirth, Tarleton wisheth Continuall Melancholy" 
(ed. Rimbault, pp. 10, ix, 35, 56). For light upon the character 
and personality of the famous comedian the most important work 
is Tarltons Jests, drawn into three -parts: His Court Witty Jests; His 
Sound City Jests; His Country Fretty Jests; full of Delight, Wit, and 

353 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Honest Mirth. The earliest edition now known is that of 1611, but 
there is reason to believe that at least the first part dates from 
the latter years of the sixteenth century. On August 4, 1600, the 
second part was entered in the Stationers' Registers (Arber, iii. 
168); and, on February xi, 1609, the book was transferred from 
one publisher to another (Arber, iii. 401). We cannot accept the 
Jests as authentic in every detail, but the anecdotes are no doubt 
partly representative of Tarlton's clownage, and contain some 
biographical facts that are supported by other evidence. The 
more important items in the Jests may be summarized (Halliwell- 
Phillipps, Jests, p. xxxviii; Chambers, Elii. Stage, ii. 344): Tarl- 
ton was a member of the Queen's troupe (Halliwell-Phillipps, 
pp. 13, zy, Z9, 30, 33); he played at the Bull in Bishopsgate (13, 
X4), the Curtain (16), and the Bell in Gracechurch Street (^4); 
he acted both the clown (Dericke) and the Judge to Knell's Harry 
in The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth (z4); he jested before 
Queen Elizabeth and the nobility (5, 7, 8); he was a Protestant 
(6, 34, 37); he was a skilled fencer (9); he was dissipated in his 
life (9, 13, 3z, 33, 36); he kept the Saba tavern in Gracechurch 
Street, where he was scavenger of the ward (15, zi, zz); his father 
lived at Ilford (40); his wife, Kate, was of a loose character (17, 
19); he kept an ordinary in Paternoster Row (zi, z6); and he had 
a squint eye (iz) and a flat nose (z8). Halliwell-Phillipps gives 
as a frontispiece to his edition of the Jests a reproduction of a 
portrait-drawing of Tarlton by John Scottowe in an initial letter 
to some verses on Tarlton's death in Harl. MS. 3885, f. 19. The 
portrait represents Tarlton as a short, broad-faced man with a 
flat nose and curly hair, wearing a cap, carrying a money-bag at 
his side, and playing on a tabor and a pipe. The verses claim that 
the drawing is a good likeness of the comedian QJests, p. xliv): 

The picture here set down 

Within this letter T: 
A-right doth shewe the forme and shape 

Of Tharlton unto the. 

354 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

When hee in pleasant wise 

The counterfet expreste 
Of clowne, with cote of russet hew 

And sturtups, with the reste. 

Whoe merry many made 

When he appeared in sight; 
The grave and wise, as well as rude. 

At him did take delight. 

The partie nowe is gone 

And closlie clad in claye; 
Of ail the jesters in the lande 

He bare the praise awaie. 

Now hath he plaid his parte. 

And sure he is of this. 
If he in Christe did die to live 

With Him in lasting bliss. 

Wilfred Partington QSmoke Rings and Roundelays, pp. 9, 10) calls 
attention to the fact that the jest on How Tarlton tooke tobacco at 
the first camming up of it (Halliwell-Phillipps, p. i6), namely that 
two of Tarlton's companions, seeing smoke come from his nose, 
"cryed out, fire, fire, and threw a cup of wine in Tarlton's face," 
was published at least as early as 161 1, "whereas the later variant 
in which Raleigh was the central figure did not appear in print 
until 1708." The reference to Yorick in Hamlet, V. i. loi, has 
been taken as a compliment to the memory of Tarlton. William 
Percy celebrates him in Cuck-Queanes and Cuckolds Errants (c. 1601), 
and has his ghost speak the prologue. The setting of the play 
is given as the Tarlton Inn, Colchester, of which he is referred to 
as the "quondam controller and induperator" (Eli^. Stage, ii. 
345; iii. 465). No other Elizabethan actor has been the object of 
so many notices in contemporary and later writing, or has been 
remembered with such various and practical tokens of esteem. A 
marginal entry in Stow's Annales (ed. 163 1, p. 698) notes: "Tarle- 
ton so beloued that men vse his picture for their signes." This 

355 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

statement is borne out by Joseph Hall, Satires (1599), vi. 1. 104 
(Works, xii. 2.79): 

O honour, far beyond a brazen shrine. 
To sit with Tarleton on an ale-post's sign! 

Also, by Ellis, History of Shoreditch (1798), p. 209, who says that 
even as late as 1798 "His portrait, with tabor and pipe, still 
serves as a sign to an alehouse in the Borough." John Oldham, 
Remains (ed. 1703, p. 108), says that his picture often adorned 
the Jakes: "One would take him for the Picture of Scoggin or 
Tarleton on a Privy-house Door, which by long standing there 
has contracted the Colour of the neighbouring Excrements." He 
is also honored in the title of a popular nursery song, published 
in Pigges Corantoe, or Newes from the North, 1642. (Halliwell-Phil- 
lipps, Nursery Rhymes of England, pp. ix, 163): 

Old Tar I ton's Song 
The king of France went up the hill, 
With twenty thousand men; 
The king of France came down the hill. 
And ne'er went up again. 

George Wilson, Commendation of Cockes, and Cock-fighting (1607), 
relates that there was on "the 4th day of May, i6ox, at a cocke- 
fighting in the citie of Norwich aforesayd a cocke called Tarleton 
(who was so intituled, because he alwayes came to the fight like 
a drummer, making a thundering noyse with his winges) which 
cocke fought many battels, with mighty and fierce aduersaries" 
(British Bibliographer, ed. Brydges and Haslewood, iv. 3x0). 
Below I cite the more interesting allusions to Tarlton. 

Roger Williams, A Brief Discourse of Warre (1590): 

Our pleasant Tarleton would counterfeite many artes, but he 
was no bodie out of his mirths. 

Nashe, Pierce Penilesse, i59z (Works, i. 188): 

A tale of a wise lustice. Amongst other cholericke wise Justices, 
he was one, that hauing a play presented before him and his 

356 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Towneship by Tarlton and the rest of his fellowes, her Maiesties 
seruants, and they were now entring into their first merriment 
(as they call it), the people began exceedingly to laugh, when 
Tarlton first peept out his head. Whereat the Justice, not a little 
moued, and seeing with his beckes and nods hee could not make 
them cease, he went with his staffe, and beat them round about 
vnmercifully on the bare pates, in that they, being but Farmers 
& poore countrey Hyndes, would presume to laugh at the Queenes 
men, and make no more account of her cloath in his presence. 

Nashe, Pierce Penilesse, 1592. (Works, i. ii5): 

Tarlton, Ned Allen, Knell, Bentlie, shall be made knowne to 
France, Sfaine, and Italie: and not a part that they surmounted in, 
more than other, but I will there note and set downe, with the 
manner of theyr habites and attyre. 

Nashe, Strange Newes, 1592. (Works, i. 319): 

Not Tarlton nor Greene but haue beene contented to let my 
simple iudgement ouerrule them in some matters of wit. 

B. R., Greenes Newes both from Heauen and Hell (1593), ed. Mc- 
Kerrow, p. 58: 

In comes Dick Tarlton, apparrelled like a Clowne, and singing 
this peece of an olde song. 

If this be trewe as true it is, 

Ladie, Ladie: 
God send her life may mend the misse. 

Most deere Ladie. 

This suddaine iest brought the whole company into such a 
vehement laughter, that not able agayne to make them keepe 
silence, for that present tyme they were faine to breake vppe. 

John Harington, Ulysses ufon Ajax (1596): 

And so to Tarlton's Testament I commend you, a little more 
drinke, then a little more bread, and a few more clothes, and God 
be at your sport, Master Tarleton. 

I could use Tarlton's jest upon you touching the secret of 
barley, who, attending one day at a great dinner on Sir Christo- 
pher Hatton, Lord Chancellor deceased, by chance, among other 

357 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

pretty jests, gave him unadvisedly the lie; for which the honour- 
able person merrily reproving him, instead of submitting him- 
self, he thus wittily justified: My Lord, said he, is it not a custom 
when a prince hath spoken any thing note worthy to say he hath 
delivered it majestically? Again, when you that are monsieurs, 
my lords, excellencies, altesses, and such like speak any thing, say 
not the assistants straitways, he concluded honourably? Nay, in 
every estate, if either noble, right worshipful, worshipful, gentle, 
common, honest, dishonest, poor or rich, sick or whole, et sic 
ad infinitum, speak any thing, doth not the world conclude 
straight that they have spoken nobly, right worshipfully, wor- 
shipfully, gently, commonly, honestly, poorly, richly, sickly, 
wholly? Nought without a lie, my Lord, quoth Dick Tarlton, 
nought without a lie: he that therefore pays it with a frown or 
stab, forgetteth himself. 

Harington, A new discourse of a stale subject, called the Metamor- 
phosis of Ajax (1596): 

What should I speake of the great league betweene God and 
man, made in circumcision? impressing a painefull stigma or 
character in God's peculiar people, though nowe most happily 
taken away in the holy sacrament of baptisme. What the worde 
signified I have known reverent and learned have bene ignorant, 
and we call it a very well of circumcision, and uncircumcision, 
though the Remists, of purpose belike to varie from Geneva, 
will needs bring in Prepuse, which worde was after admitted into 
the theater with great applause by the mouth of Mayster Tarlton, 
the excellent comedian, when many of the beholders, that were 
never circumcised, had as great cause as Tarlton to complaine of 
their Prepuse. 

The Returne of Parnassus (c. 15 97-1 601), ed. Macray, p. 34: 

Ingenioso. O fustie worlde! were there anie commendable pas- 
sage to Styx and Acharon I would go live with Tarleton, and 
never more bless this dull age with a good line. Why, what an 
unmanerlie microcosme was this swine-faced clowne! But that 
the vassall is not capable of anie infamie, I would bepainte him; 
but a verie goose quill scornes such a base subject, and there is no 
inke fitt to write his servill name but a scholeboye's, that hath 
bene made by the mixture of urin and water. 

358 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Thomas Bastard, Chrestoleros (1598), ed. Grosart, p. 8z, Epigram 

39- 

T)e Richardo Tharltono 

Who taught me pleasant follies, can you tell? 

I was not taught and yet I did excell; 

'Tis harde to learne without a president, 

'Tis harder to make folly excellent; 

I sawe, yet had no light to guide mine eyes, 

I was extold for that which all despise. 

Meres, Palladis Tamia (1598), ed. Smith, EUx.. Crit. Essays, ii. 3x3 : 

As Antipater Sidonius was famous for extemporall verse in 
Greeke, and Ouid for his Qukquid conabar dicere versus erat: so was 
our Tarleton, of whome Doctor Case, that learned physitian, 
thus speaketh in the Seuenth Booke and seuenteenth chapter of 
his Folitikes: Aristoteles suum Theodoretum laudauit quendam feritum 
Tragaediarum actorem, Cicero suum Roscium; nos Angli Tarletonum, in 
cuius voce et vultu omnes iocosi affectus, in cuius cerebroso capite lepidae 
facetiae habitant. 

Samuel Rowlands, The Letting of Humours Blood in the Head-Vaine 
(1600), Epigram 30, p. 36 (Works, i): 

When Tarlton clown'd it in a pleasant vaine, 

And with conceites, did good opinions gaine 

Vpon the Stage, his merry humors shop, 

Clownes knew the Clowne, by his great clownish slop. 

But now th' are gull'd, for present fashion sayes, 

Dicke Tarltons part, Gentlemens breeches playes: 

In euery streete where any Gallant goes. 

The swagg'ring Sloppe, is Tarltons clownish hose. 

Charles FitzgeofFrey, Cenotafhia (1601), ed. Grosart, p. xx: 

Richardo Tarltono 

Conspicienda amplo quoties daret ora Theatro 
Tarltonus, lepidum non sine dente caput, 
Spectantum horrifico coelum intonat omne cachinno, 
Audijt & plausus aula suprema lovis. 
Attoniti stupuere Poll stupuere polorum 
Indigenae indigites coelicolumque cohors. 
Hausuri ergo tuos omnes Tarltone lepores 

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A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Elysia in terras valle redire parant. 

Id metuans, ne fors deserta Ivpiter aula 

Bellerofhontaeos transigat vsque dies, 

Ha! crudele tibi scelus imperat Atropos, et tu 

Tarltonvm ad Plures, insidiosa rapis. 

Quod nisi tu peteres superos Tarltone, petissent 

Te superi, ad blandos conflua turba jocos. 

Grosart, p. xxiii, gives a translation "for the benefit of the general 

reader": 

To Richard Tarlton 

Oft in the theatre as Tarlton's face 
Was seen, instinct with keenness as with grace, 
A thunderous roar of laughter straight arose 
From all who saw, and shook the sky's repose; 
The heavens were all astonished and the host 
Of native deities who crowd heaven's coast. 
To enjoy the pleasantries they all prepare, 
Tarlton, to quit for earth the elysian air. 
Jove, fearing lest his halls being vacant made. 
His lonseome days should pass in lowering shade, 
A cruel crime he wreaks upon thy head : 
The treacherous Fury bids thee join the Dead. 
But if thou hadst not sought the gods on high. 
The gods to seek thee would have left the sky, 
Circling thy gracious jocularity! 

T. Wright, Passions of the Minde in generall (1601), quoted by 
Dobell in his edition of The Partiall Law, p. 1x7: 

Sometimes I have scene Tarleton play the clowne, and use no 
other breeches than such sloppes or slivings as now many gen- 
tlemen weare: they are almost capable of a bushel of wheate; 
and if they be of sackecloth, they would serve to carrie mawlt 
to the mill. 

John Manningham, D/^ry, January, 1602., ed. Bruce, p. 16: 

Tarlton called Burley house gate in the Strand towardes the 
Savoy, the Lord Treasurers Almes gate, because it was seldom 
or never opened. 

Ashmolean MS. 38, 187 (also in Hobson Jests, 1607, where the 
anecdote is attributed to Hobson): 

360 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Uppon on Medcalfe 
I desire you all in the Lordes behalfe 
To praye for the soule of poere John Calfe. 

But Tarlton, the jester, noting the simplicitie of the poett, 
wrightes this: 

O cruell death, more subtell than a fox. 

Thou mightst have lett hym live to have bine an oxe, 

For to have eaten both grass hay and corne, 

And like his sire to have worn a home. 

Stradling, Epigrammata (1607): 

Rich. Tarltono, Comoedorum principi. Epit. 

Cujus (viator) sit sepulchrum hoc scire vis, 

Inscriptionem non habens? 

Asta, gradumque siste paulisper tuum: 

Incognitum nomen scies. 

Princeps Comoedorum tulit quos Angliae 

Tellus, in hoc busto cubat. 

Quo mortuo, spretae silent Comoediae, 

Tragoediaeque turbidae. 

Scenae decus desiderant mutae suum, 

Risusque abest Sardonius. 

Hie Roscius Britannicus sepultus est. 

Quo notior nemo fuit. 

Abi, viator: Sin te adhuc nomen latet, 

Edicet hoc qui vis puer. 

Dekker, GulVs Horn-Book (1609), p. 11: 

TarUton, Kemp, nor Singer, nor all the litter of Fooles that now 
come drawling bchinde them, never played the clownes more 
naturally than the arrantest Sot of you all shall. 

Heywood, Apology for Actors (i6ii), p. 43: 

Here I must needs remember Tarleton, in his time gratious with 
the queene, his soveraigne, and in the people's generall applause. 

Humphrey King, An Halfe-Penny worth of Wit, in a Penny-worth of 
Paper, 1613 (Bibliotheca Heberiana, iv. 1x05): 

Let us talke of Robin Hoode 

And little John in merry Shirewood, 

361 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Of Poet Skelton with his pen, 

And many other merry men, 

Of May-game Lords and Sommer Queenes, 

With Milke-maides, dancing or'e the Greenes, 

Of merry Tarlton in our time. 

Whose conceite was very fine, 

Whom death hath wounded with his dart. 

That lov'd a May-pole with his heart. 

Ben Jonson, Bartholomew Fair (1614), Induction 38: 

Stage-Keeper. I kept the Stage in Master Tar le tons time, I thanke 
my starres. Ho! and that man had liu'd to haue play'd in Bar- 
tholomew Fay re, you should ha' seene him ha' come in, and ha' 
beene coozened i' the Cloath-quarter, so finely! And Adams, the 
Rogue, ha' leap'd and caper'd vpon him, and ha' dealth his ver- 
mine about, as though they had cost him nothing. 

The Partiall Law (c. 1615-30), ed. Dobell, p. 43: 

Nay, that's as old as the beginning of the world, or Tarlton 's 
Trunk-hose. 

Machivells Dogge (161 7): 

Tell captaine Tospot with his Tarleton's cut, 
His swaggering will not get him sixteene pence. 

John Davies of Hereford, Wits Bedlam (1617): 

Here within this sullen earth 
Lies Dick Tarlton, lord of mirth; 
Who in his grave, still laughing, gapes, 
Syth all clownes since have been his apes. 
Earst he of clownes to learne still sought. 
But now they learne of him they taught; 
By art far past the principall. 
The counterfet is so worth all . 

Henry Peacham, Thalia's Banquet (i6io): 

To Sir Ninian Ouxjll 

As Tarlton when his head was onely seene. 
The Tire-house doore and Tapistrie betweene. 
Set all the multitude in such a laughter, 

361 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

They could not hold for scarse an houre after. 

So, sir, I set you, as I promis'd, forth, 

That all the world may wonder at your worth. 

William Vaughan, Golden Fleece (i6x6): 

In the meane space, as long as like mules you claw one another, 
I assure you wise masterships that you shall but minister matter 
to Buffones of rederision, as some of your alliance sometimes felt 
from the mouth of Tarleton, who being upon the stage in a towne 
where he expected for civill attention to his Prologue, and seeing 
no end of their hissing, hee brake forth at last into this sarcasti- 
call taunt: 

I liv'd not in the Golden Age, 

When Jason wonne the fleece. 

But now I am on Gotam's stage, 

Wher fooles do hisse like geese. 

John Taylor, the Water Poet, Wit and Mirth, iGx^ (Works, p. 353): 

Dicke Tarleton said that hee could compare Queene Elizabeth 
to nothing more fitly than to a Sculler; for, said he. Neither the 
Queene nor the Sculler hath a fellow. 

Henry Peacham, Truth of our Times (1638), p. 103 (N. & jg., 1867, 
xii. xxx): 

I remember when I was a schoolboy in London, Tarlton acted a 
third son's part, such a one as I now speake of: His father being a 
very rich man, and lying upon his death-bed, called his three 
sonnes about him. ... To the third, which was Tarlton (who 
came like a rogue in a foule shirt without a band, and in a blew 
coat with one sleeve, his stockings out at the heeles, and his 
head full of straw and feathers), as for you, Sirrah, quoth he, you 
know how often I have fetched you out of Moorgate and Bridwell, 
you have beene an ungracious villaine, I have nothing to be- 
queath to you but the gallowes and a rope. Tarlton weeping, and 
sobbing upon his knees (as his brothers) said, O Father, I doe not 
desire it, I trust in God you shall live to enjoy it your selfe. 

Richard Brome, Antipodes (1638), II. ii. (Works, iii. x6o): 

Letoy. Yes in the dayes of Tarlton and Kempe, 
Before the stage was purg'd from barbarisme, 

363 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

And brought to the perfection it now shines with, 
Then fooles and jesters spent their wits, because 
The Poets were wise enough to save their owne 
For profitabler uses. 

Richard Baker, Theatrum Redivivum Ci66x), p. 34 (N. & Q., 1880, 
i. 113): 

For let him [Prynne] try when he will, and come himself upon 
the Stage, with all the scurrility of the Wife of Bath, with all 
the ribaldry of Poggius or Boccace, yet I dare affirm, he shall never 
give that contentment to Beholders as honest Tarlton did, though 
he said never a word. 

William Camden, Remains (edit. 1674; reprint of 1870, p. 431): 

Upon merry Tarlton, I have heard this: 

Hie situs est cujus vox, vultus, actio possit 
Ex Heraclito reddere Democritum. 

Baker, Chronicle (edit. 1674), P- 5°°' 

To make their Comedies compleat, Richard Tarleton, who for 
the Part called the Clowns Part, never had his match, never will 
have. 

For less important allusions to Tarlton see: A Whip for an Ape, 

1589 (N. &j2., 1858, vi. 7); Thomas Nashe, An Almond for a Parrot, 

1590 (Works, iii. 341); Thomas Nashe, Pierce Penniless, i59Z 
(Works, i. 197); Thomas Nashe, Strange Newes, 1592. (Works, i. 
308); Gabriel Harvey, Four Letters, i59x (Works, i. 168, iox); 
Thomas Nashe, Terrors of the Night, 1594 (Works, i. 343); Thomas 
Lodge, Wits Miserie, 1596, (Works, iv. 80); The Discoverie of the 
Knights of the Post, 1597; J- M., A Health to the Gentlemanly Pro- 
fession of Seruingmen, 1598 (Graves, Mod. Phil., xviii. 493); Robert 
Armin, Quips upon Questions, 1600 (Ibid., p. 493); Letter from the 
Earl of Salisbury to the Earl of Shrewsbury, March 7, 1607 (E. 
Lodge, Illustrations, edit. 1838, iii. 2.31); The Abortive of an Idle 
Hour, i6zo; Augustine Vincent, A Discoverie of Errours, i6ix, ad- 
dress to the reader; John Taylor, the Water Poet, Sir Gregory Non- 
sence (Works, p. 160); R. Junius, The Drunkard's Character, 1638 

364 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Graves, Mod. Phil. ,xyin. 493); S. F., Sportive Funeral Elegies, 1656 
Qbid., p. 493); Henry Peacham, Worth of a Penny (edit. 1687, 
p. 6). 

TATTERDELL, HUGH. 

Under license of November 10, 1619, Hugh Tatterdell is named 
as a member of the Red Bull Company that visited Reading on 
November 30 of the same year (Murray ii. 386). 

TAWYER, WILLIAM. 

William Tawyer (or Toyer) appears as a minor actor or stage- 
attendant with the King's men about 1619-15, apprenticed to 
John Heminges. He is mentioned in a stage-direction of the 162.3 
folio text of A Midsummer Night' s Dream, V. i. iz8: "Tawyer with 
a trumpet before them." This evidently refers to a performance 
by the King's men between 1619 and 16x3, because neither the 
1600 nor 1 61 9 quarto of the play gives Tawyer 's name. He is 
doubtless identical with the William Toyer named in a Protec- 
tion from Arrest issued by Herbert on December 2.7, 16x4, to 
twenty-one men "imployed by the Kinges Maiesties servantes 
in theire quallity of Playinge as Musitions and other necessary 
attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 74). The records of St. 
Saviour's note the burial in June, 16x5, of "William Tawier, Mr. 
Heminges man" (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, ii. tGo, note 2.x). 

TAYLOR. 

Taylor is named in marginal notes to the plays in the British 
Museum Egerton MS. 1994. He had a minor part in The Captives, 
and appears as a guard and as a soldier in The Two Noble Ladies 
(Boas, Library, 1917, viii. 131, 2.30- On September 3, 16x4, The 
Captives was licensed for the Cockpit company (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. X9), i.e. the Lady Elizabeth's men. The Two Noble Ladies, 
"often tymes acted with approbation at the Red Bull in St. 
John's Streete by the company of the Revells" (BuUen, Old Plays, 
ii. 430), is assigned by Fleay to i6i9-xx (Drajna, ii. 334). 

365 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TAYLOR, JOHN. 

Master of the Choir at St. Mary's, Woolnoth, 1557; Master of 
the Song School at Westminster, 1561-67 QEli^.- Stage, ii. 72., 73). 

TAYLOR, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 and 1598 (Hille- 
brand. Child Actors, p. iii). 

TAYLOR, JOHN. 

Possibly an actor whose name accidentally crept into the text 
of George a Green, printed in 1599 "As it was sundry times acted 
by the seruants of the right Honourable the Earl of Sussex." At 
line 14 (Greene, Plays, ed. Collins, ii. 183), Kendall asks: 

Say, lohn Taylour, 
What newes with King lames? 

TAYLOR, JOSEPH. 

Joseph Taylor is perhaps to be identified with a person of the 
same name baptized at St. Andrew's by the Wardrobe in Black- 
friars on February 6, 1586. He is probably the Joseph Taylor who 
married Elizabeth Ingle, widow, at St. Saviour's, Sothwark, on 
May X, 1 610; and who is recorded in the Southwark token-books 
as a resident of "Mr. Langley's new rents, near the playhouse" 
in 1607, of Austen's Rents in i6ii and 1615, as "gone" in 1617, 
as "near the playhouse" in 16x3 and 16x9, "on the Bankside" in 
1 63 1, and of Gravel Lane in 1633. The registers of St. Saviour's 
record the following children of "Joseph Taylor, a player": 
Elisabeth (baptized July ix, i6ix), Dixsye and Joseph (baptized 
July XI, 1614), Jone (baptized January 11, 1616), Robert (bap- 
tized June I, 1617), and Anne (baptized August X4, 16x3). A 
Joseph Taylor is mentioned in 16x3 as living "in Bishoppsgate 
neare the Spittle" (Collier, iii. 460 ff.; Rendle, Bankside, p. xxvi; 
Wallace, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 347). He first appears as a player with 
the Duke of York's company, and is named in the patent of 

366 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

March 30, 1610. He joined the Lady Elizabeth's troupe on its 
formation about April, 1611. As a result of this transfer he seems 
to have incurred the disfavor of certain members of the Duke of 
York's company. Subsequently a lawsuit arose between Taylor 
and John Heminges, concerning some theatrical costumes that 
had been sold to the Duke's men on the recommendation of 
Taylor (Wallace, Globe Theatre Apparef). On August Z9, 161 1, 
Taylor and his fellow-actors of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe gave 
Henslowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" of agree- 
ment (H.P., pp. 18, III). He served as payee for the Court per- 
formances by the Lady Elizabeth's players during 1 613-14 
(Steele, pp. 183, 186). The 1679 ^^lio of Beaumont and Fletcher 
names him as one of the "principal actors" in The Coxcomb and in 
The Honest Mans Fortune, both of which were probably acted 
by the Lady Elizabeth's men in 1613 (Elix.. Stage, ii. i5i). In 1614 
the same company acted Jonson's Bartholomew Fair, in which 
Cokes says, V. iii: "I thinke, one Taylor, would goe neere to beat 
all this company, with a hand bound behinde him" (ed. C. S. 
Alden, p. 113). This is presumably an allusion to Taylor the 
actor; but John Taylor the Water Poet has also been suggested. 
During 161 5 Prince Charles's troupe (formerly known as the 
Duke of York's troupe) and the Lady Elizabeth's troupe were 
more or less closely associated in their theatrical activities. On 
the separation of the two companies in 161 6 Taylor was again 
a Prince's man; on March io, 161 6, he joined his fellow-actors in 
an agreement with Alleyn and Meade (H.P., p. 91). As a member 
of the Prince's company he appeared early in 1619 as Doctor 
Almanac in Middleton's M.asque of Heroes (Works, vii. 1.06). By 
May 19, 1 619, he had joined the King's men, perhaps taking the 
place of Burbage, who had died on March 13. From this date to 
the closing of the playhouses in 1641 he was one of the most 
prominent members of the King's company. He became a dis- 
tinguished actor, took over several of Burbage's famous parts, 
and was a leader in the management of the troupe. He is named 

367 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Murray, i. opp. 172.) in the 16x3 folio list of Shakespearean 
players; in the livery allowances of May 19, 1619 (his earliest 
appearance as a King's man), and April 7, i6xi; in the submission 
for playing The Spanish Viceroy, without license, December 7.0, 
162.4 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. zi); in the list of players who took 
part in King James's funeral procession on May 7, i6i5; in the 
patent of June X5, 16x5 QM.S.C, i. x8x); and in the warrants for 
liveries on May 6, 16x9, April xx, 1637, March ix, 1639, and 
March xo, 1641 (Stopes, Jahrhuch, xlvi. 95, 99, loi, 104). He and 
Lowin and Swanston served as payees for the Court performances 
by the King's men from April X7, 1634, to March xo, 1641 (Steele, 
pp. X44, X49, x6x, X67, X74, X76). Nicholas Tooley in his will 
dated June 3, 16x3, instructed his executors to pay a debt of £10 
for which he was surety for Taylor (Collier, iii. 453). About 
1637 Taylor petitioned for "the next King's waiter's place which 
shall fall void in the Custom House, London" (S.P.D. Charles I, 
ccclxxvii. 13). On November 11, 1639, he was appointed to the 
office of Yeoman of the Revels (Cunningham, Revels, p. i). Sir 
Henry Herbert was perhaps responsible for the appointment, for 
in February, 1635, he had requested King Charles to give him 
permission "to commend a fitt man" for the post; the King had 
replied: "I will not dispose of it, or it shall not be disposed of, 
till I heare you" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 68). In 1635 he controlled 
two-sixteenths of the Globe and one-eighth of the Blackfriars, 
which shares he apparently acquired after the death of Condell 
in 16x7 (Adams, Mod. Phil., xvii. 7 fF.). Lowin held a similar 
interest in the playhouses; he and Taylor seem to have shared 
the business responsibilities of the King's men in their transac- 
tions with Herbert, with the Court, and in general. Taylor as- 
sumed parts in the following plays (Murray, i. opp. 17X): The 
Humorous Lieutenant (c. 1619); The Custom oj the Country (c. 1619-xo); 
The Double Marriage (c. 1619-xo); Ferdinand, formerly played by 
Richard Burbage, in The Duchess of Malfi (1619-X3); Women Pleased 
(c. 16x0); The Little French Lawyer (c. 16x0); The False One (c. 16x0- 

368 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ii); The Pilgrim (c. 162.1); The Island Princess (c. i6ii); The Laws 
of Candy (c. i6ii); The Prophetess (i6zi); The Sea Voyage (i6xx); 
The Spajiish Curate (16x3); The Maid in the Mill (16x3); The 
Lover s Progress (16x3); The Wife for a Month (162.4); Paris, the 
Roman Actor, in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed October 11, 
1 6x6); Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed November 14, i6x8); 
Mathias, a knight of Bohemia, in Massinger's Picture (licensed 
June 8, 16x9); the Duke in Carlell's Deserving Favorite (published 
16x9); Antiochus in Massinger's Believe as You List (licensed May 
7, 1 631); and Mirabel, the Wildgoose, "incomparably acted," 
in Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase (a revival, 163 1). According to the 
testimony of Downes (Ros. Ang., p. xi), Taylor repeated in- 
structions that he received from Shakespeare for the playing of 
the part of Hamlet: "Hamlet being Perform'd by Mr. Betterton, 
Sir William [Davenant] (having seen Mr. Taylor of the Black- 
Fryars Company Act it, who being Instructed by the Author Mr. 
Shaksepear) taught Mr. Betterton in every Particle of it." The 
statement of Downes cannot be accepted without modification. 
Taylor is not known as a King's man until May, 1619; Burbage, 
the original Hamlet, died in March, 1619; and Shakespeare died 
three years earlier. That Taylor succeeded Burbage in this part 
we know from Wright's Historia Histrionica (Hazlitt's Dodsley, 
XV. 405): "Before the wars . . . Taylor acted Hamlet incom- 
parably well, Jago, Truewit in The Silent Woman, and Face in 
The Alchymist." That he played Arbaces, King of Iberia, in Beau- 
mont and Fletcher's A King and no King is shown by Gay ton, 
Pleasant Notes upon Don Quixot (1654), p. X5: "Insomuch that 
our Emperour (having a spice of self-conceit before, was soundly 
peppered now) for he was instantly Metamorphoz'd into the 
stateliest, gravest and commanding soule, that ever eye beheld. 
Taylor acting Arbaces, or Swanston D'Amboys, were shadowes to 
him; his pace, his look, and all his garb was alter'd." We learn 
from Richard Flecknoe's Enigmatical Characters (1665) that he 
was also famous as Mosca, Volpone's parasite, in Jonson's Vol- 

369 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

■pone. In the Character of One Who Imitates the Good Companion 
Another Way (said to have been composed in 1654), Flecknoe 
writes: "He is one, who, now the stage is down, acts the para- 
site's part at table; and, since Taylor's death, none can play 
Mosca so well as he" (Variorum, iii. 2.18). He and Lowin are re- 
ferred to in Alexander Gill's satirical verses on Jonson's Magnetic 
Lady, in i63i(Jonson, Works, vi. 116): 

Lett Lownie cease, and Taylore feare to touch 
The loathed stage; for thou hast made ytt such. 

According to Shackerley Marmion's verses prefixed to Fletcher's 
Faithful Shepherdess (1634), Taylor was instrumental in bringing 
about the revival of the play at Court in 1634. Herbert gives the 
entry, January 6, 1634 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 53): "On Monday 
night, the sixth of January and the Twelfe Night, was presented 
at Denmark-house, before the King and Queene, Fletchers pas- 
torall called The Faithfull Shepheardesse, in the clothes the Queene 
had given Taylor the year before of her owne pastorall." The 
verses by Marmion first appear in the edition of 1634 (Beaumont 
and Fletcher, Works, ii. 52.3): 

Unto his^worthy friend Mr. Joseph Taylor upon his presentment of the 
Faithful Shepherdesse before the King and Queene, at White-hall, 
on Twelfth night last. 16}}. 

When this smooth Pastorall was first brough forth, 

The Age twas borne in, did not know it's worth. 

Since by thy cost, and industry reviv'd. 

It hath a new fame, and new birth atchiv'd. 

Happy in that shee found in her distresse, 

A friend, as faithfull, as her Shepherdesse. 

For having cur'd her from her courser rents, 

And deckt her new with fresh habiliments. 

Thou brought'st her to the Court, and made her be 

A fitting spectacle for Majestie. 

So have I seene a clowded beauty drest 

In a rich vesture, shine above the rest. 

Yet did it not receive more honour from 

The glorious pompe, then thine owne action. 

370 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Expect no satisfaction for the same, 

Poets can render no reward but Fame. 

Yet this He prophesie, when thou shalt come 

Into the confines of Elysium 

Amidst the Quire of Muses, and the lists 

Of famous Actors, and quicke Dramatists, 

So much admir'd for gesture, and for wit, 

That there on Seats of living Marble sit, 

The blessed Consort of that numerous Traine, 

Shall rise with an applause to entertaine 

Thy happy welcome, causing thee sit downe. 

And with a Lawrell-wreath thy temples crowne. 

And mean time, while this Poeme shall be read, 

Taylor, thy name shall be eternized. 

For it is just, that thou, who first did'st give 

Unto this booke a life, by it shouldst live. 

Shack. Marmyon. 

Wright in Historia Histrionica (1699) records that on the closing 
of the playhouses and the outbreak of civil war, Taylor, Lowin, 
and Pollard "were superannuated," and that Taylor acted Rollo, 
in Rollo, or the Bloody Brother, at the Cockpit in 1648 (Hazlitt's 
Dodsley, xv. 409). Mercurius Anti-Britannicus , published at Oxford 
on August II, 1645, gives the note: "the Players . . . say 'twas 
never a good World, since the Lord Viscount Say and Seale suc- 
ceeded Joseph Taylor" (Rollins, Stud, in Phil., xviii. X74). In 1647 
he joined a group of the King's players in publishing and dedi- 
cating Beaumont and Fletcher's plays in folio (Works, i. p. x). 
In 1651 Fletcher's Wildgoose Chase (Works, iv. 407) was published 
for the "private benefit" of Taylor and Lowin. Thomas Killi- 
grew in Parson's Wedding (printed in 1663) alludes to Taylor 
(Hazlitt's Dodsley, xiv. 505): "Captain. But who should I meet 
at the corner of the Piazza, but Joseph Taylor: he tells me there's 
a new play at the Friars to-day." He, Lowin, and Swanston are 
praised by Snarl, who admires nothing but the things of a former 
age, in Thomas Shadwell's Virtuoso, acted in 1676 (Works, i. 
3x8): 

371 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Miranda. Methinks, though all Pleasures have left you, you 
may go see Plays. 

Snarl. I am not such a Coxcomb, I thank God: I have seen 'em 
at Black-Fryers. Pox, they act like Poppets now, in Sadness. I, 
that have seen Joseph Taylor, and Lowen, and Swansteadl Oh, a 
brave roaring Fellow, would make the House shake again! 
Besides, I can never endure to see Plays, since Women came on 
the Stage. Boys are better by half. 

Taylor contributed commendatory verses to the 1619 quarto of 
Massinger's Roman Actor (Works, i. p. clvi): 

To his long-known and loved Friend, Mr. Philip 
Massinger, upon his Roman Actor. 

If that my lines, being placed before thy book, 
Could make it sell, or alter but a look 
Of some sour censurer, who's apt to say. 
No one in these times can produce a play 
Worthy his reading, since of late, 'tis true. 
The old accepted are more than the new: 
Or, could I on some spot o' the court work so. 
To make him speak no more than he doth know; 
Not borrowing from his flatt'ring flatter'd friend 
What to dispraise, or wherefore to commend: 
Then, gentle friend, I should not blush to be 
Rank'd 'mongst those worthy ones which here I see 
Ushering this work; but why I write to thee 
Is, to profess our love's antiquity. 
Which to this tragedy must give my test. 
Thou hast made many good, but this thy best. 

Joseph Taylor. 

He was buried at Richmond, Surrey, on November 4, 1652. (Cun- 
ningham, Revels, p. i; Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 411). 

TEODOR, JACOB. 

A player with Robert Reynolds's company in Germany, during 
16x7 at Torgau, and in May, 1618, at Cologne (Herz, pp. 31, 54). 

THAIRE, WILLIAM. 
See William Thayer. 

372- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

THARE, JOHN. 

John Thare (or Thayer) belonged to Worcester's men in i6ox- 
03, as shown by his authorizing payments on their behalf at 
various dates between August xi, 1602., and January i, 1603 
(H.D., ii. 314). When playing in London was suspended, owing 
to the illness of Queen Elizabeth, Thare must have gone at once 
to Germany, for he and Thomas Blackwood visited Frankfort 
with Robert Browne's players at the Easter fair of 1603. Thare is 
recorded at Ulm and at Augsburg in December of the same year 
(Herz, p. 41). 

THAYER, JOHN. 
See John Thare. 

THAYER, WILLIAM. 

William Thayer (or Thaire) was a member of the Children of 
Paul's in 1594 and 1598 (Hillebrand, Child Actors, p. iii). 

THOMKINS, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1598 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

THOMPSON, JOHN. 

John Thompson appears to have begun his theatrical career 
with the King's men as John Shank's apprentice, as evidenced by 
the Sharers' Papers of 1635. Shank had paid £40 for him. He was 
dead by 1635 (Halliwell-Phillipps, Outlines, i. 316). With the 
King's company he is known to have played (Murray, i. opp. 
lyx) Julia in The Duchess of Malfii (i6i9-X3); in The Pilgrim (c. 
i6xi); in The Maid in the Mill (16x3); in The Lover s Progress (16x3); 
Domitia, wife of Aelius Lamia, in Massinger's Roman Actor (li- 
censed October 11, i6i6); in Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed 
November 14, i6i8); Honoria, the Queen, in Massinger's Pic- 
ture (licensed June 8, 1619); and Cleonarda, the King's sister, in 
Carlell's Deserving Favorite (published in 16x9). 

373 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TILBERY, JOHN. 

A member of the Children of the Chapel Royal on November 
II, 1405 (Cal. Pat. Rolls, Henry IV, iii. 96). 

TOBYE, EDWARD. 

Edward Tobye is named in a license granted to the Children of 
the Revels to the late Queen Anne, on April 9, 1613 (Murray, i. 
361; ii. 2.J7.-JT,'). He possibly acted a servant in Richard II, as 
suggested by a marginal note in the Egerton MS. of the play, 
where "Toby" is substituted for "ser" (Boas, Library, 1917, 
viii. 2.33). 

TOMSON, SAM. 

Sam Tomson played Menester, an actor, in Richards 's Mes- 
sallina, the Roman Empress, printed in 1640 as "acted with gen- 
erall applause divers times by the Company of his Majesties 
Re veils." 

TOMSONE,JOHN. 

A player, who borrowed 5J. from Henslowe on December xl, 
1598 (H.D., i. 40; ii. 315). 

TONY, WILL. 

Will Tony seems to have acted Martin Marprelate, "attired 
like an ape" (cf. Fleay, Drama, ii. ii6). Nashe, An Almond for a 
Parrat (1590), writes: "Therefore we must not measure of Martin 
as he is still allied to Elderton or tongd like Will Tony, as he was 
attired like an Ape on ye stage" (Works, iii. 354). McKerrow 
(Nashe, iv. 466) says: "I can give no information about this 
person. One may safely infer that he was notorious for the scur- 
rility of his language." 

TOOLEY, NICHOLAS. 

Nicholas Tooley's original name appears to have been Nicholas 
Wilkinson. Although his name is given as Tooley in the main 
text of his will in 16x3, he made a codicil signed Nicholas Wil- 

374 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

kinson, alias Tooley, to insure the validity of the document. Thus 
he may be the Nicholas, son of Charles Wilkinson, whose bap- 
tism is recorded at St. Anne's, Blackfriars, on February 3, 1575 
(Collier, iii. 448). He has been conjectured to be the Nick (^.f.) 
who acted in 2 Seven Deadly Sins (c. 1590); who appears in the 
16x3 folio text of The Taming of the Shrew, ioT whom the Admiral's 
men bought hose on December X5, 1601; and who is mentioned 
by Joan Alleyn in a letter on October xi, 1603. At some period 
during his career he was doubtless apprenticed to Richard Bur- 
bage, whom in his will he calls his "late master." He was ap- 
parently with the King's men by May 4, 1605, when Augustine 
Phillips left him 7.0s. as his "fellowe." He continued with this 
company until his death in 16x3. He acted (Murray, i. opp. lyz) 
in The Alchemist (1610); Catiline (161 1); Bonduca (1613-14); The 
Queen of Corinth (c. 1617); The Loyal Subject (1618); as Barna- 
velt's wife in Sir John van Olden Barnavelt (1619); in The Custom 
of the Countey (c. i6i9-io); The Double Marriage (c. i6i9-io); as 
Forobosco and a madman in The Duchess of Malfi, about 1619-2.3; 
in Women Pleased (c. 162.0); The Little French Lawyer (c. 162.0); 
The False One (c. i62.o-zi); The Pilgrim (c. i6ii); The Laws of 
Candy (c. i6xi); The Prophetess (i6ii); The Sea Voyage (162.2.); and 
The Spanish Curate (i6zz). The inclusion of his name in the actor- 
list of Wife for a Month, licensed May tj, 162.4, is evidently a mis- 
take, for he died almost a year before that date. He is named in the 
patent of March 2.j, 1619; in the livery allowances of May 19, 
1 619, and April 7, i6xi; and in the 162.3 folio list of Shakespearean 
players. On March 12., 1619, he witnessed Richard Burbage's 
nuncupative will. His own will is dated June 3, 162.3 (Collier, 
iii. 45X-56). He left various sums of money to charity and to 
friends, including members of the family of his "late master" 
Richard Burbage, the wife and daughter of Henry Condell, and 
Joseph Taylor; forgave debts of John Underwood and William 
Ecclestone; assigned £10, "over and besides such sommes of 
money as I shall owe unto her att my decease," to Mrs. Burbage, 

375 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

"the wife of my good friend, Mr. Cuthbert Burbage (in whose 
house I doe nowe lodge), as a remembrance of my love, in re- 
spect of her motherlie care over me' ' ; and appointed Burbage and 
Condell his executors and residuary legatees. The register of St. 
Giles's, Cripplegate, records on June 5, 16x3, the burial of "Nich- 
olas Tooley, Gentleman, from the house of Cuthbert Burbidge, 
Gentleman" (Collier, iii. 451). 

TOSEDALL, ROGER. 

Roger Tosedall is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for per- 
mission to act in that town (Murray, i. xy^-So). 

TOTTNELL,HARRY. 

A player, whose daughter Joan was baptized at St. Saviour's 
on March 1.0, 15 91 C^liZ- Stage, ii. 347), and buried October i, 
1593. A Harry Tottnell, not specified as a player, was buried there 
on January i8, 1593 (Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19^8, p. 856). 

TOWNE, JOHN. 

John Towne appears to have been a member of Queen Eliza- 
beth's company from its formation in 1583 to about 1597. In 
1583 he was with the Queen's men in London; he is named in a 
City record that gives the personnel of the company at this time 
QEliZ- Stage, ii. 106). Again in 1588 he is mentioned in a docu- 
ment concerning the Queen's players, for the non-payment of 
8j-. 4^. subsidy QM.S.C, i. 354). On May 8, 1594, he served as a 
witness to a loan by Philip Henslowe to the latter's nephew, 
Francis Henslowe, "to laye downe for his share to the Queues 
players" (H.D., i. 4; ii. 80), and was himself in all probabilty at 
this time a Queen's man. Finally, he is described as "one of 
Her Maiesties plears" on July 8, 1597, when Roger Clarke, "bond 
lace wever" of Nottingham, released him of a debt (Murray, 

ii- 377)- 

376 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TOWNE, THOMAS. 

Thomas Towne appears as an Admiral's man on December 14, 
1594, in the first list of the company in Henslowe's accounts. 
Thereafter he is mentioned in various records of the Admiral's 
men, as witnessing transactions, as borrowing money from Hen- 
slowe, as paying debts, as authorizing payments on behalf of 
the troupe, and as acknowledging company debts. At some date 
after March 14, 1597, he and John Singer borrowed 4oj-. from 
Henslowe "when they went into the contrey." On April 7, 
1599, Henslowe advanced ioj". to him and Richard Alleyn "to 
go to the corte vpon ester euen" (H.D., i. 5, 104, 199; ii. 315). 
With the Admiral's men he acted (H.P., pp. 153, 154; Eliz.. Stage, 
ii. 175) Myron-hamec in Frederick and Basilea (1597)5 Stukeley 
in The Battle of Alcazar (c. 1600-01), and Shah, an oracle, and (in 
the Procession) a Tartar in / Tamar Cam (i6oi). About Christmas, 
1603, the Admiral's men were taken into the service of Prince 
Henry. As a member of the Prince's company Towne is named 
in the coronation list of March 15, 1604; in the patent of April 
30, 1606; and in the household list of 1610 (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 186, 
187, 188). He appeared as "a sweeper" in Dekker's Honest Whore, 
Part I (1604), acted by the Prince's players, as shown by a 
stage-direction: "Enter Towne like a sweeper" (Dekker, Works, 
ii. 78). Edward Alleyn on October xS, 1608, granted him an an- 
nuity of £12., acquittances for which are recorded to January 15, 
i6ix, where he is described as "of St. Saviour's, Southwark, 
gent.," and where his wife's name is given as Agnes (Warner, pp. 
71, 2.36). He is recorded in the Southwark token-books during 
1600-07. The register of the same parish records the burial of 
Thomas Towne, "a man," on August 9, 1G12.. In his will dated 
July 4, i6iz, he mentions his wife (called Ann), his brother John, 
of Dunwich in Suffolk ("if he be still living)," and leaves £3 to 
his fellow-actors Bird, Downton, Juby, Rowley, Massey, and 
Humphrey JefFes, "to make them a supper when it shall please 
them to call for it" (Elzi- Stage, ii. 347). The Alleyn papers men- 

377 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

tion a "widdow Towne" on November 5, 1612.; and a letter, 
about 1 61 3, from Massey to Alleyn, shows that she received £50 
from the Prince's company on the death of her husband (Warner, 
pp. 36, 138). 

TOWNE'S BOY. 

"Towne's boy" appeared as a page in The Battle of Alcazar, 
acted by the Admiral's men about 1600-01 (H.P., p. 153; Eliz- 
Stage, ii. 175-76). 

TOWNSEND, JOHN.. 

John Townsend and Joseph Moore are named in a license of 
April 2.7, 161 1, as leaders of the Lady Elizabeth's troupe (M.S.C., 
i. 2.74). On August Z9, 1611, he and his fellow-actors gave Hen- 
slowe a bond of £500 to perform "certen articles" of agreement 
(H.P., pp. 18, III). On July 11, 1617, he and Moore were paid 
£30 for three plays given before King James on his journey to 
Scotland during the preceding March or April (Steele, p. 198). 
A new patent of March xo, 161 8, mentions him as a leader of the 
Lady Elizabeth's players. Until 1631 he evidently shared with 
Moore the managerial responsibilities of the company on pro- 
vincial tours. He was leader of the troupe at Norwich on May 
X3, 1 61 8, and May r, i6xi. He is mentioned in a bill of March 
13, i6ii, signed by the Lord Chamberlain, and in the patent of 
March xo, i6xx. The company was under his management at Nor- 
wich on May i, i6xi, and at Leicester on July 9, 16x4. He and 
Wambus came to Norwich on September 2.8, 16x4, and desired re- 
dress for the imprisonment of Wambus during the preceding 
April and May, but their request was dismissed. On December 9, 
i6i8, the Lady Elizabeth's men were granted another patent, in 
which Townsend 's name occurs. He accompanied the troupe to 
Reading on December x4, 16x9, and appears as co-leader with 
Moore at Coventry on March 30, 1631. He is last heard of in a 
license of November x8, 1634, granted to a company under the 
leadership of William Daniel, and known as the King's Revels 

378 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

(Murray, i. X43, x^t., 2.^4-9, 2.6x; ii. 8, 193, x^i, 316, 340, 344-7, 
350, 370, 386). The register of St. Bodolph Aldgate records the 
burial on November 15, 1619, of Christopher Bodie, "Stab'd with 
an All," a servant to John Townsend, "a Player of Enterludes" 
(Denkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 106). 

TOY. 

Evidently the performer of Will Summer in Nashe's Summer s 
Last Will and Testament (Works, iii. X33, 'i.€j, 2.94), acted in 1592- 
at Croydon, possibly by members of Archbishop Whitgift's 
household (Eli^. Stage, ii. 451-53): 

Will Summer. I, that haue a toy in my head more then ordinary. 

Bacchus. Ho, wel shot, a tutcher, a tutcher: for quaffing Toy 

doth passe, in cup, in canne, or glasse. 
All. God Bacchus doe him right, 

And dubbe him knight. 

[Here he dubs Will Summer with the blacke lacke. 
Bacchus. Rise vp. Sir Robert Tospot. 
Summer. No more of this, I hate it to the death. 

The Epilogue. The great foole Toy hath marde the play: Good 
night. Gentlemen; I go. 

[Let him be carryed aivay. 
Will Summer. Is't true, Jackanapes, doo you serue me so? 

McKerrow (Nashe, iv. 436) calls attention to a reference to Toy 
in Four Letters (i59i), where Gabriel Harvey (Works, i. 189) says 
of Robert Greene: ' 'They wronge him much with their Epitaphs, 
and other solemne deuises, that entitle him not at the least, The 
second Toy of London; the Stale of Poules. 

TREVELL, WILLIAM. 

William Trevell owned one-half of one share in the syndicate 
that in 1608 leased the Whitefriars playhouse (Adams, Play- 
houses, pp. 313-15, 2,2.1.'). He seems to have had some connection 
with the playhouse in 162.1, as suggested by a lawsuit between 
him and Thomas Woodford in 1641 (Eli^. Stage, ii. 347, 517). 

379 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TRIGG, WILLIAM. 

William Trigg was apparently a King's man from about 162.6 
to the closing of the playhouses in 1647.. With the King's 
company he played (Murray, i. opp. 171) Julia, daughter, to 
Titus, in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed October 11, i6z6); 
an unassigned part in Ford's Lover's Melancholy (licensed Novem- 
ber i4, 1 6x8); Corsica, Sophia's woman, in Massinger's Picture 
(licensed June 8, 16x9); and Rosalura, in Fletcher's Wildgoose 
Chase (a revival, 163 1). He is named in the "Players Pass" 
granted to certain members of the King's troupe on May 17, 1636. 
That he continued with the King's men and joined the royalist 
forces at the outbreak of civil war in iG^ip. is evidenced by an al- 
lusion to him in a satirical pamphlet, Certaine Propositions Of- 
fered to the Consideration of the Honourable Houses of Parliament, pub- 
lished during the latter part of 16^1. (Collier, ii. 39). The fifth 
proposition urges the use of Biblical, rather than "profane," 
plots for dramas, and concludes: 

It would not be amiss, too, if, instead of the music that plays 
between acts, there were only a Psalm sung for distinction sake. 
This might be easily brought to pass, if either the Court play- 
writers be commanded to read the Scriptures, or the City Scrip- 
ture readers be commanded to write plays. This, as it would 
much advantage our part, so would it much disadvantage the 
King's; for, as by it we should gain a new place of edifying, so 
Captain Trigg, and the rest of the players which are now in 
service, would doubtlessly return to their callings, and much 
lessen the King's army. 

TRUSSELL, ALVERY. 

A member of the Chapel Royal about 1600-01. In Henry Clif- 
ton's complaint to the Star Chamber on December 15, 1601, as 
to how young boys were pressed as actors for the Chapel troupe 
at Blackfriars, Alvery Trussell is named as one so taken, and is 
described as "an apprentice to one Thomas Gyles" (Wallce, 
Blackfriars, p. 80). 

380 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TUCKFEILD, THOMAS. 

Thomas Tuckfeild is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December xy, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed 
by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). He is probably identical with the "T. Tucke" men- 
tioned in a stage-direction (V. iii) of The Tivo Noble Kinsmen, 
printed in 1634 as "Presented at the Blackfriers by the Kings 
Maiesties servants, with great applause." He and Curtis (?) 
Greville appear as attendants (Brooke, Shak. Apoc, p. 344). 

TUNSTALL, JAMES. 

James Tunstall (Dunstall or Dunstone) is named as a member 
of Worcester's troupe in the abstract of the license of January 14, 
1583, as given in the Leicester records QEliZ- Stage, ii. ^.^£). He 
appears as witness of transactions for Edward and John Alleyn 
and others on October z8, 1585, July 6 and 8, 1590, November 7.1,, 
1590, and May 6, 1591 (Warner, pp. 3, 4, Z5i, ^53.) During 1590- 
91 he belonged to the Admiral's men at the Theatre, as shown by 
the testimony of John Alleyn in the Brayne-Burbage lawsuit 
(Wallace, N.U.S., xiii. izy). His name occurs in the first list 
of the Admiral's men in Henslowe's accounts on December 14, 
1594. He bought a gown from Henslowe on August xy, 1595; 
opened an account on October 14, 1596; and authorized payments 
for the company before November x8 and on December 11, 1596. 
He witnessed agreements for Henslowe on July zy and August 3 , 
1597, which is his last appearance in the records of the Admiral's 
men (H.D., i. xoi; ii. 2.61). He acted a governor and a friar in 
Frederick and Basilea, presented by the Admiral's troupe about 
June, 1597 (H.P., p. 153). The register of St. Botolph's, Bishops- 
gate, records on August xo, 1572., the baptism of a Dunstone 
Tunstall (Warner, p. 3^.). He is alluded to by Guilpin, Skialetheia 
(1598), Epigram 43 (Works, p. 18): 

Clodus me thinks lookes passing big of late. 
With Dunstons browes, and Aliens Cutlacks gate. 

381 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

TURNER, ANTHONY. 

Anthony Turner is first known as a member of the Lady Eliza- 
beth's company in i6ii, when he is named in Herbert's list of 
"the chiefe of them at the Phoenix" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 63). 
Possibly he is to be identified with a person of the same name 
mentioned in the Middlesex County Records (ed. JeafFreson, ii. 185) 
on October 13, 16x4, when recognizances were taken for the ap- 
pearance of Dorothy Turner before the Session of Peace to answer 
"for cruelly beatinge and abusinge her husband Anthony Turner." 
He apparently joined Queen Henrietta's company at the Cockpit 
in Drury Lane at its formation soon after the accession of Charles 
L With this organization he continued until 1637 (Murray, i. 
165-67), appearing as Justice Lanby in Shirley's Wedding (c. 
i6x6); as Old Lord Bruce in Davenport's King John and Matilda 
(c. 1619); as a kitchen-maid in the first part of Heywood's Fair 
Maid of theWest, and as Bashaw Alcade in the second part (c. 1630); 
and as Piston, in Nabbes's Hannibal and Scipio (1635). At the 
reorganization of Queen Henrietta's troupe about October, 1637, 
he joined the Revels company at Salisbury Court, as shown by 
Herbert's record (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. GC): "I disposed of Per- 
kins, Sumner, Sherlock, and Turner, to Salisbury Court, and 
joynd them with the best of that company." The amalgamated 
company evidently continued to be known as the Queen's players, 
and Turner no doubt remained with the troupe at Salisbury 
Court until the closing of the playhouses in 1641. On March 6, 
1640, he (by an obvious error noted as "Henry") served as payee 
for Court performances by the Queen's men (Steele, p. 171). On 
January 8, 1641, he and Richard Perkins are named in a warrant 
for liveries "for themselves and twelve of their fellows of the 
Queen's Majesty's company of players" (Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 
103). He is presumably the A.T. who signed with Andrew Penny- 
cuicke (^.f.) the dedication of William Heminges's Fatal Contract 
(1653), addressed to the Earl and Countess of Northampton. The 
last notice of him is found in the Middlesex County Records (ed. 

382. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

JeafFreson, iii. 179) on May ix, 1659, when William Wintershall 
Qq.v.') and one Henry Eaton gave recognizances for his appear- 
ance on a charge of "unlawfull mainteining of Stage-playes and 
enterludes att the Redd Bull in St. John's Street." 

TURNER, DREWE. 

Drewe Turner was a member of Richard Bradshaw's company, 
a troupe that got into trouble at Banbury in May, 1633 . The town 
authorities becoming suspicious of the validity of the company's 
license, arrested the players, and notified the Privy Council. The 
players appeared before the Privy Council in June, and were soon 
discharged "upon bond given to be forthcoming whensoever they 
should be called for." In the examination of the players by the 
Banbury officials. Turner testified on May x, 1633, that he "has 
been with this company of players these twelve months," and 
"does nothing but drive the horse and beat the drum" (Murray, 
ii. io6fF.,i63ff.). 

TUSSER, THOMAS. 

From Thomas Tusser's autobiographical verses, printed in the 

1573 edition of his Five Hundred Pointes of Good Husbandrie (ed. 

Payne and Herrtage, pp. xiii, 2.oi), we learn that about 1540 he 

was a member of the Children of Paul's: 

But marke, the chance, my self to vance. 
By friendships lot, to Paules I got. 
So found I grace, a certaine space, 

still to remaine: 
With Redford there, the like no where, 
For cunning such, and vertue much. 
By whom some part of Musicke art, 

so did I gaine. 

Whether he acted in plays, however, does not appear. 

UBALDINI, PETRUCCIO. 

Petruccio Ubaldini in an undated letter to Queen Elizabeth 
refers to a play at Court, and was possibly associated with "Al- 

383 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

fruso Ferrabolle [Ferrabosco] and the rest of the Italian players" 
who received payment for a Court performance of February xy, 
1576 QM.S.C, ii. 147; Steele, p. 59). He was an illuminator and 
man of letters in the patronage of royalty and nobility, and lived 
in England from i-^St. to 1586 (£/i^. Stage, ii. 164; D.N.B., 
Iviii. I fF.). 

UNDERELL. 

The Henslowe accounts record a payment of 10s. in wages to 
one Underell for Worcester's men on October 11, i6oz. He was 
probably a hired man of Worcester's company (H.D., i. i8i; ii, 
316). A Thomas Underell is known as a royal trumpeter from 
1609 to 16x4 (Eli^. Stage, ii. 348). 

UNDERHILL, NICHOLAS. 

Nicholas Underhill is named in a Protection from Arrest issued 
by Herbert on December tj, 162.4, to twenty-one men "imployed 
by the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge 
as Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. 
Rec, p. 74). 

UNDERWOOD, JOHN. 

John Underwood, as a member of the Children of the Chapel 
Royal, acted in Cynthia's Revels, 1600, and in The Poetaster, 1601 
(Eliz.. Stage, iii. 363, 365). Subsequently, with Field and Ostler, 
he was "taken to strengthen the Kings service" (Halliwell- 
Phillipps, Outlines, i. 317). The transfer of Underwood and Field 
to the King's company is also noted by Wright in Historia His- 
trionica (Hazlitt's Dodsley, xv. 416). He had passed to the King's 
men by 1610, when he is found in the cast of Jonson's Alchemist. 
As a King's man he assumed parts in the following plays (Mur- 
ray, i. opp. 172.)- Catiline (1611); Valentinian (1611-14); Bonduca 
(1613-14); The Queen of Corinth (c. 1617}; The Loyal Subject (1618); 
The Knight of Malta (c. 1618); The Humorous Lieutenant (r. 1619); 
The Custom of the Country (c. i6i9-zo); The Double Marriage (c. 

384 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

i6i9-xo); Delio and a madman in The Duchess of Malfi, about 
i6i9-Z3 (ed. Sampson, p. xi6); The Little French Lawyer (c. i6io); 
Women Pleased Qc. i6xo); The False One (c. i6io-xi); The Laws of 
Candy (c. i6xi); The Island Princess (c. i6ii); The Pilgrim (c. i6ii); 
The Sea Voyage (i6iz); The Maid in the Mill (16x3); The Lover's 
Progress (16x3); and The Wife for a Month (16x4). He is also named 
in the patent of March zy, 1619; in the livery allowances of May 
15, 1619, and April 7, i6xi; and in the 16x3 folio list of Shake- 
spearean players. Nicholas Tooley forgave him a debt in his will 
dated June 3, 16x3 (Collier, iii. 454). The register of St. Bartholo- 
mew the Less, West Smithfield, records the baptism of his son 
John on December xj, 1610. His will, dated October 4, 16x4, with 
a codicil dated October 10 (apparently appended after his death, 
from oral directions), describes him as "of the parish of Saint 
Bartholomew the Less, in London, gent." (Collier, iii. 444-46), 
He assigns his shares in the Blackfriars, Globe, and Curtain to 
Henry Condell and two other executors, who are directed to 
hold these in trust for his five children, all in their minority: 
John, Elizabeth, Burbage, Thomas, and Isabel. He left iij-. each 
for memorial rings for his executors and for John Heminges and 
John Lowin, overseers of the will. Condell in his will, dated 
December 13, 16x7, mentions this trust in special terms, and 
directs his wife as executrix to discharge faithfully his duty 
towards Underwood's children (Collier, iii. 377). An Underwood 
still controlled one share in the Blackfriars in 1635 (Halliwell- 
Phillipps, Outlines J i. 313). 

VAN WILDER, PHILIP. 

Philip van Wilder was a royal lutenist and Gentleman of the 
Privy Chamber. In February, 1550, he was granted a commission 
to organize a troupe, presumably of young minstrels. That he 
was connected with such an organization even earlier than 1550 
is suggested by references to "Philippe and his fellows yong myn- 
strels" and to his "six singing children" QEliz- Stage, ii. 31). 

385 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

VERNON, GEORGE. 

George Vernon is known as a King's man from 16x4 to 1619. 
His name occurs in a Protection from Arrest issued by Herbert on 
December rj, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by the Kinges 
Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as Musitions 
and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 74). He 
is probably the "G. Ver" mentioned in the manuscript of Beau- 
mont and Fletcher's Honest Man's Fortune, relicensed for the 
King's men on February 8, 1615 (^Eliz.- Stage, iii. xxy). As a King's 
man he appears in the list of players who took part in King 
James's funeral procession on May 7, 16x5; presumably as Sejeius, 
in Massinger's Roman Actor (licensed October 11, i6i6); in the 
cast of Ford's Lover s Melancholy (licensed November X4, 162.8); 
and in the livery allowance of May 6, 16x9 (Murray, i. 161, opp. 
iji.; Stopes, Jahrbuch, xlvi. 95). The baptism of his children is 
recorded in the register of St. Saviour's, Southwark: Elizabeth, 
July 13, 1616; Anne, July 7, i6i8; and George, April 30, 1630, 
(Bentley, T.L.S., Nov. 15, 19x8, p. 856). 

VINCENT. 

As a musician one Vincent appears in "Sloth" of 2 Seven Deadly 
Sins, acted by Strange 's men about 1590 (Greg, H.P., p. 152.; 
R.E.S., i. z6i). 

VINCENT, THOMAS. 

Thomas Vincent was prompter at the Globe. He is known only 
in an anecdote concerning him and John Singer (^.t^.). 

VIRNIUS, JOHANN FRIEDRICH. 

Johann Friedrich Virnius was in the service of the Elector of 
Brandenburg in 161 5, when he and Bartholomeus Freyerbott 
visited Danzig as the Brandenburg Comedians (Bolte, p. 41). 

WAKEFIELD, EDWARD. 

Edward Wakefield was in Germany during 1597 and i6oz. He 
was presumably an actor in 1597, when he engaged in a quarrel 

386 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

with Thomas Sackville (^.f.) in a Brunswick tavern. The Bruns- 
wick household accounts record a payment of i6o thalers to him 
on December x8, 1601. (Cohn, p. xxxiv). 

WALPOLE, FRANCIS. 

Francis Walpole is named as a member of Queen Anne's com- 
pany, in the Baskervile papers of June, 1616, and June, 1617 
QEliZ- Stage, ii. zt,j, ^38). 

WAMBUS, FRANCIS. 

Francis Wambus (or Waymus) is known as a member of the 
Lady Elizabeth's troupe from 1611 to 16x4. On August 7.^, 1611, 
he and his fellow-actors gave Henslowe a bond of £500 to observe 
"certen articles" of agreement C^.P., pp. 18, iii). He is named 
in the license granted to the company on March xo, 161 8; in the 
Norwich records of May X3, 1618, and April xz, i6zo; in the 
patent of March lo, 162.x; in a bill of March 13, i6xx, signed by 
the Lord Chamberlain; and in the Norwich annals on May 10, 
16x3. On April X4, 16x4, he visited Norwich as leader of the 
company. He was not permitted to play, because of a letter, dated 
May xy, 16x3, from the Privy Council to the authorities at Nor- 
wich, which ordered them "not to suffer any players to shewe 
or exercise any playes within this Citty" until further notice 
from the Council. Wambus said that he would play in spite 
of the order, and was therefore committed to prison on April 
x6. He apparently remained in the Norwich prison until May 
x6, when he and William Bee C^.t'.), who has been doubtfully 
identified as William Beeston (jl-v.^, were discharged by order 
of the Mayor, after John Townsend Qq^.v.') had agreed to pay 
the charges. On September x8, 16x4, accompanied by Town- 
send, he appeared again at Norwich and asked from the 
authorities recompense for the imprisonment; but the request 
was not granted (Murray, i. X43, X5X, X55-58; ii. 193, 345- 
50, 359-60). 

387 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

WARD, ANTHONY. 

As a member of the licensed troupe of four "common players 
of interludes," Anthony Ward is recorded at Hastings on March 
15, 1603 (see John Arkinstall). 

WATERS, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1607 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. Hi). 

WAYMUS, FRANCIS. 
See Francis Wambus. 

WEBSTER, GEORGE. 

George Webster in 1598 was a member of Robert Browne's 
company in the service of the Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel; he 
served as treasurer of the troupe on its visit to Heidelberg. He 
appears as leader of the Hessian comedians at Frankfort in March, 
and at Nuremberg in April, 1600; again at Frankfort for Easter, 
1 601, and during the autumn of the same year; and once more at 
Frankfort for Easter, 1603, although the players had left the 
Landgrave's service in 1602. (Herz, pp. 16, 38 fF.). 

WEBSTER, JOHN. 

A John Webster accompanied Robert Browne at Cassel, Ger- 
many, in August, 1596, during the visit of the Earl of Lincoln, 
who came from England to stand proxy for Queen Elizabeth as 
godmother at the christening of the Landgrave's daughter 
(Herz, pp. 13 ff.). He may be the dramatist. 

WEDWER, WILLIAM. 

A player, with Robert Reynolds's company in Germany during 
16x7 and 1640 (Herz, pp. 31, 55). 

WEEKES, RICHARD. 

On November 10, 16x9, Richard Weekes (or Wickes) and Wil- 
liam Perry were granted a license as managers of the Red Bull 

388 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

company. They visited Reading on November 30, 16x9, and 
about November of the following year. On June 6, 1635, Weekes 
and John Shank, "the younger," were leaders of the troupe at 
Norwich. In March, 1636, a complaint was made against Weekes 
and Perry for playing at Canterbury during Lent. Weekes is last 
heard of at Norwich on May 11, 1636, when the company was 
under his management (Murray, i. 2.J1., 174, Z75 ; ii. 357, 358, 386). 

WEND, JOHN. 

A player, with Robert Reynolds's company in Germany during 
16x7 and 1640 (Herz, pp. 31, 55). 

WESTCOTT, SEBASTIAN. 
Master of the Children of Paul's from about 1557 to 1581. 

WESTE, HUMPHREY. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors J p. III). 

WESTE, THOMAS. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors i p. III). 

WHEATON, ELIZABETH. 

Elizabeth Wheaton was probably a gatherer or servant of some 
kind in the employ of the King's players. Henry Condell (j^-v.'), 
in his will dated December 13, 16x7, left her 40j-. and "that place 
or priviledge which she now exerciseth and enjoyeth in the 
houses of the Blackfryers, London, and the Globe on the Bank- 
side." 

WHETSTONE. 

In 1 571 one Whetstone, with William Fidge, owed Robert 
Betts, a deceased Canterbury painter, 35J. 4^. "for their portions 
in buyinge of certen playe-bookes." Whetstone may have been 
an actor, and is possibly to be identified with George Whetstone, 

389 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

the dramatist (Plomer, Library, 1918, ix. 2.51). His play. Promos 
and Cassandra (1578), is addressed to William Fleetewoode, with 
a dedication that is interesting for its literary criticism on "the 
vse and abuse of Commedies." 

WHITE, JOSIAS. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
162.8, Josias White is recorded at Norwich on July x of the same 
year (Murray, ii. 103). 

WHITE, ROBERT. 
See Robert Hunt. 

WHITELOCKE, JAMES. 

James Whitelocke, later Sir James and judge of the Court of 
King's Bench, attended the Merchant Taylors' School from 1575 
to 1588 (p.N.B., Ixi. 117). He tells us in Liber Famelicus (ed. 
Bruce, p. ix) that he acted in plays at Court, under the master- 
ship of Richard Mulcaster: 

I was brought up at school under mr. Mulcaster, in the famous 
school of the Marchantaylors in London, whear I continued 
untill I was well instructed in the Hebrew, Greek and Latin 
tongs. Hiscarewasalsotoencreasmy skill in musique, inwhiche 
I was brought up by dayly exercise in it, as in singing and play- 
ing upon instruments, and yeerly he presented sum piayes to the 
court, in whiche his scholers wear only actors, and I on among 
them, and by that meanes taughte them good behaviour and 
audacitye. 

WHITING, EDWARD. 

Edward Whiting's connection with a provincial company of 
players is rather obscure. From the testimony of members of 
Richard Bradshaw's troupe, who got into trouble at Banbury in 
May, 1633, we learn that Whiting was a surgeon of Nottingham, 
who either had been or was in some way connected with the 
company, and the father of Richard Whiting Cq.v.'), ^/z<^j- Johnson. 

390 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

He appears to have sold his theatrical commission to Richard 
Bradshaw C^.v.^, and the town authorities, suspicious of the 
validity of the license, brought the players to trial. He was ap- 
parently also interested in a puppet-show that became bankrupt 
under the management of William Cooke and Fluellen Morgan 
(Murray, ii. io6 fF., 163 ff.). 

WHITING, RICHARD. 

Richard Whiting, alias Johnson (see Richard Johnson), was a 
member of Richard Bradshaw's company, when that troupe got 
into trouble at Banbury in May, 1633. The town authorities be- 
coming suspicious of the validity of the company's license, ar- 
rested the players, and notified the Privy Council. The players 
appeared before the Privy Council in June, and were soon dis- 
charged "upon bond given to be forthcoming whensoever they 
should be called for." In the examination of the players by the 
Banbury officials. Whiting testified on May i, 1633, that he "has 
been with this company of players about half a year," that he 
"has acted a part with these players lately in divers places," and 
that Edward Whiting (^.f.) was his father (Murray, ii. 106 fF., 
163 ff.) 

WICKES, RICHARD. 
See Richard Weekes. 

WIGPITT, THOMAS. 

A joint-lessee of the new Fortune playhouse, in which he ob- 
tained a half-share on May xo, i6zz (Warner, pp. 146-47). 

WILBRAHAM, WILLIAM. 

William Wilbraham played Isaac, Sir John Belfare's man, in 
Shirley's Wedding (c. i6z6), and Bashaw Alcade in Heywood's 
Fair Maid of the West, Part I (c. 1630), both plays of Queen Hen- 
rietta's men, at the Cockpit in Drury Lane. On March 10, 1635, 
he is recorded at Norwich, as a member of presumably the King's 

391 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Revels company, when the troupe applied for permission to act 
in that town (Murray, i. opp. 7.66, 179-80). On July 7, 1640, 
Elizabeth Beeston, widow of Christopher Beeston, secured a loan 
of £150 from Wilbraham, and gave him a mortgage on the Cock- 
pit property as security (Hotson, p. 94). 

WILKINSON, JOHN. 
See John Wylkynson. 

WILKINSON, NICHOLAS. 
See Nicholas Tooley. 

WILL. 

Will appears as Itys in "Lechery" of 2 Seven Deadly Sins, acted 
by Strange's men about 1590 (Greg, H.P., p. 151; R.E.S., i 2.61). 

WILL. 

Will assumed the part of Leonora in Frederick and Basilea, pre- 
sented by the Admiral's men in June, 1597 QH.P., p. 153). Fleay 
{Stage, p. 141) conjectures that he is identical with Will Barne 

WILLANS, GEORGE. 

See George Williams. 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE. 

Under license of November 10, 162.9, George Williams is named 
as a member of the Red Bull company that appeared at Reading 
on November 30 of the same year. He is probably identical with 
the George Willans who is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 
1635, as a member of presumably the King's Revels company, 
when the troupe applied for permission to act in that town (Mur- 
ray, i. irjx, 179-80; ii. 356, 386). 

WILLIAMS, JOHN. 

A member of the Chapel Royal in 1509 and 1511 (Hillebrand, 
M.od. Phil., xviii. 144; Chambers, Eliz.. Stage, ii. x.jn.') 

392- 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

WILLIS, RICHARD. 

As a member of Ellis Guest's company under license of June 7, 
i6x8, Richard Willis is recorded at Norwich on July z, 162.8 
(Murray, ii. 103). 

WILLSON, HARRY. 

See Henry Wilson. 

WILLY, "OUR PLEASANT." 

See Richard Tarlton. 

WILLYAMS, WALTER. 

Walter Willyams is recorded at Norwich on March 10, 1635, 
when his troupe, presumably the King's Revels, applied for 
permission to act in that town (Murray, i. ^79-80). 

WILSON, GERMAINE. 

A member of the Children of Paul's in 1594 (Hillebrand, Child 
Actors, p. III). 

WILSON, HENRY. 

Henry Wilson is named in a Protection from Arrest issued by 
Herbert on December 7.j, 16x4, to twenty-one men "imployed by 
the Kinges Maiesties servantes in theire quallity of Playinge as 
Musitions and other necessary attendantes" (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
p. 74). He is probably identical with the Harry Willson men- 
tioned in a stage-direction of Massinger's Believe as You List 
(ed. Croker, p. 71): "Harry Willson & Boy ready for the Song 
at ye Arras." The play w^as licensed for the King's men on May 
7, 1 63 1 (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 33). 

WILSON, JOHN. 

John Wilson appears to have been a performer in Much Ado 
about Nothing, at some date before 162.3. The 1600 quarto of the 
play gives the stage-direction (II. iii. 3 8): "Enter Balthaser with 
musicke," which in the 162.3 folio becomes: "Enter . . . lacke 

393 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Wilson." Wilson must therefore have played Balthasar and sung 
"Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more." Perhaps he may be identi- 
cal with John, son of Nicholas Wilson, "minstrel," recorded in 
the baptismal register of St. Bartholomew the Less, West Smith- 
field, on April X4, 1585. The registers of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, 
shows that he had an elder brother Adam (baptized November 
18, i58z), a wife Joan (buried July 17, 16x4), and an unnamed son 
buried on September 3, 1614, from the house of George Somer- 
sett C^.v.^, musician (Collier, Actors, pp. xvii-xix). He was ap- 
parently a city wait from about 16x2. to 1641. There was 
another John Wilson, born in 1595, a royal lutenist and an emi- 
nent musician. A confusion of the two persons of the same name 
has naturally resulted QShak. Soc. Papers, ii. 33; D.N.B., Ixii. 
103 ff.). One of the Wilsons took part in a performance, pre- 
sumably A Midsummer Night's Dream, given at the house of John 
Williams, Bishop of Lincoln, on September zy, 1631, which of- 
fended the Puritans (Murray, ii. 148-50). 

WILSON, ROBERT. 

Robert Wilson belonged to the Earl of Leicester's company 
in 1571 when he signed a letter addressed to the Earl requesting 
continued patronage; and he is named in the patent granted to 
Leicester's troupe on May 10, 1574 QM.S.C, i. i6i, 348). He is 
presumably the Wilson referred to as Leicester's player in a letter 
of April 2.5, 1581, from Thomas Bayly (jl-v.'), who says that he 
is "willing and able to do much" in matters theatrical. That he 
was a distinguished actor of the time is evidenced by an allusion 
to him in Gabriel Harvey's Letter-Book (c. 1579), where he is 
coupled with Tarlton (ed. E. J. L. Scott, p. 67): "howe per- 
emptorily ye have preiudishd my good name for ever in thrust- 
inge me thus on the stage to make tryall of my extemporall 
faculty, and to play Wylsons or Tarletons parte." He was also 
a playwright, as shown by a reference to him about 1580 by 
Thomas Lodge in his Defence of Poetry, Musick, and Stage Plays, a 

394 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

reply to Stephen Gosson's Schoole of Abuse. Lodge (Works, i. 43) 
accuses Gosson of plagiarism in his play of Catiline's Conspira- 
cies, not extant, and declares that he prefers Wilson's Shorte and 
Sweete, a lost play supposedly on the same theme. Lodge char- 
acterizes this play by Wilson as "a peece surely worthy prayse, 
the practise of a good scholler." Wilson became associated with 
Queen Elizabeth's men when the troupe was first organized in 
1583; he is named in a London record that gives the personnel 
of the company at this time (Eliz.. Stage, ii. 106). Howes (con- 
tinuation of Stow's Annates, edit. 1631, p. 698) tells of the estab- 
lishment of the Queen's troupe of twelve players, among whom 
are "two rare men," Tarlton and Wilson, and the latter is noted 
"for a quicke delicate refined extemporall wit." Wilson served 
as payee for the Court performances by the Queen's men during 
the Christmas season of 1584-85 (Steele, pp. 91, 9z). His name 
does not appear in the list of the Queen's men in 1588, by which 
date he may have left the company — but this list is possibly in- 
complete. Meres, in Palladis Tamia (1598), also couples him with 
Tarlton {Elix^. Crit. Essays, ed. Smith, ii. 3x3); after praising 
Tarlton for "extemporall verse," he continues: "And so is now 
our wittie Wilson, who for learning and extemporall witte in 
this facultie is without compare or compeere, as, to his great and 
eternall commendations, he manifested in his challenge at the 
Swanne on the Banke side." Heywood mentions him with other 
actors as having flourished before his time, i.e. before about 
1594 {Apology, p. 43). At an uncertain date, but earlier than 1594, 
he had doubtless retired from the regular stage, though making 
occasional appearances in extemporal performances, and turned 
to the writing of plays (Elix.. Stage, ii. 349). He is taken to 
be the author ("R. W.") of The Three Ladies of London (1584), 
of The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London (1590), and of The Cob- 
bler s Prophecy (1594), "by Robert Wilson, Gent." He colla- 
borated in a number of plays now lost, as shown by the Hens- 
lowe accounts of the Admiral's men, chiefly during 1598 (H.D., 

395 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ii. 3ZO-ZI; Eliz- Stage, iii. 516). He is also mentioned in 1598 
with his collaborators, as "the best for Comedy amongst vs," 
by Meres, Falladis Tamia (Smith, op. cif., ii. 3x0). The last 
notice of him in the Henslowe records occurs in a letter from 
Robert Shaw to Henslowe, on June 14, 1600 (H.P., pp. 55 ff.). 
He is probably the "Robert Wilson, yoman (a player)," whose 
burial is recorded in the parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, on 
November 2.0, 1600 (Collier, Actors, p. xviii). Thus far this sketch 
takes no account of the theory that there were two Elizabethan 
dramatists by the name of Robert Wilson — a moot question that 
has for many years troubled historians of the stage. The Diction- 
ary of National Biography (Ixii. 12.3-2.5) and other more or less 
reputable modern works include as playwrights both an "elder" 
and a "younger" Robert Wilson (for various conjectures, see 
Fleay, Drama, ii. 176-85; Collier, Actors, p. xviii; Baldwin, M. 
L. N., xli. 34). According to the most careful scholarship of the 
present day, we may now discard the twofold theory, since there 
seems to be no adequate proof for supposing two dramatists by 
the name of Robert Wilson, and the so-called "younger" Wilson 
is not known to have been connected with the stage (Chambers, 
Eliz,. Stage, ii. 350; Greg's review of The EUxabethan Stage, in 
R. E. S., i; and I. Gourvitch, Notes and Queries, cl. 4 ff.). 

WILSON, WILLIAM. 

William Wilson appears to have been a stage-attendant, 
gatherer, or minor actor, at the Fortune playhouse about 161 7 
(J. Q. Adams, "An 'Hitherto Unknown' Actor of Shakespeare's 
Troupe?" M.L.N. , 1919, xxxiv. 46). Before November i, 1617, 
he wrote to Edward Alleyn, requesting his help in touching the 
benevolence of Thomas Down ton, Edward Juby, and other mem- 
bers of the company at the Fortune, on the plea that he was to 
be married at an early date. The register of St. Saviour's, South- 
wark, is said to record that "William Wilson was married . . . 
to Dorothea Seare, on Sunday, Nov. 2., 161 7." The letter, which 

396 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

has been handled by at least two London booksellers during the 
present century, is here given in somewhat modernized form: 

To my most deare and especeall good frend 
Mr Edward Alleyn at Dulwich ... 

Right worshipfull, my humble dutie remember d — hoping in 
the Almightie of your health and prosperety, which on my 
knees I beseeche him long to contyneue, ffor the many favors 
which I haue from tyme to tyme received my poor abillety is not 
in the least degree able to give you satisfaction, vnless as I and 
myne haue byn bounden to you for your many kyndnes soe will 
wee duringe life pray for your prosperety. I confess I haue found 
you my cheifest frend in midest of my extremeties, which makes 
me loath to presse or request your favor any further, yet for that 
I am to be married on Sunday next, and your kindnes may be a 
great help and furtherance vnto me towards the raisinge of my 
poore and deserted estate, I am enforced once agayne to entreat 
your worships furtherance in a charitable request, which is that 
I may haue your worships letter to Mr. Downton and Mr. Ed- 
ward Juby to be a meanes that the Company of players of the 
Fortune male either offer at my wedding at St. Saviors church, 
or of their owne good natures bestowe something vpon me on 
that day. And as ever I and myne will not only rest bounden vnto 
your worship but contyneually pray for your worships health 
with encreas of all happynes longe to contyneue. In hope of your 
w^orships favor herin, I humbly take my leave. Resting 
Your worshipps during life to be commanded, 

William Wilson. 

WINTER, RICHARD. 

Richard Winter was possibly a player at Canterbury about 
1571. He owed money to Robert Betts, a deceased Canterbury 
painter, with whom William Fidge and one Whetstone (who 
seem to have been actors) also had accounts (Plomer, Library, 
1918, ix. ^53). 

WINTERSELL, WILLIAM.. 
See William Wintershall. 

397 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

WINTERSHALL, WILLIAM. 

Wiliam Wintershall (or Wintersell) is mentioned with Wil- 
liam Cartwright, junior, by Wright in Historia Histronka (1699), 
as belonging to the company at Salisbury Court (Hazlitt's Dods- 
ley, XV. 404). Wintershall does not appear with Cartwright in the 
Norwich list of the King's Revels on March 10, 1635, which 
possibly justifies the assumption that he did not become a fel- 
lows-actor with Cartwright until the amalgamation of Queen Hen- 
rietta's men and the King's Revels company at Salisbury Court 
about October, 1637 (cf. Murray, i. 167-68). If so, he was prob- 
ably a Queen's man at Salisbury Court from 1637 to the closing 
of the playhouses in 1641. Nothing further is heard of him until 
May IX, 1659, when the Middlesex County Records (ed. Jeaffreson, 
iii. 2.79) show that he and one Henry Eaton gave recognizances 
for the appearance of Anthony Turner (^.f.) on a charge of 
"unlawfull mainteining of Stage-playes and enterludes att the 
Redd Bull in St. John's Street." After the Restoration he joined 
the company formed out of "the scattered remnants" of players 
belonging to several of the older houses during the reign of 
Charles I. He is named in the Petition of the Cockpit Players on 
October 13, 1660, and in the Articles of Agreement between Her- 
bert and Killigrew on June 4, 1662. (Adams, Dram. Rec, pp. 94, 
96, 1 13-14). His Majesty's Company of Comedians opened their 
new playhouse, the Theatre Royal, on May 7, 1663 (Pepys, Diary, 
iii. 107), under the management of Thomas Killigrew. As a 
member of this organization Wintershall assumed the following 
parts (Downes, Ros. Ang., x ff.): the King in The Humorous Lieu- 
tenant; Sir Amorous in The Silent Woman; Subtle in The Alchemist; 
the King in The Maid's Tragedy; Gobrias in A King and no King; 
the King in King Henry the Fourth; Don Alonzo in The Mock As- 
trologer; Odmar in The Indian Emperor; Arimant in Aureng Zeb; 
Pelopidus in Mythridates, King of Fontus; Polydamus in Marriage 
Alamode; King John of France in The Black Prince; and Bomilcar, 
in Sophonisba, or Hannibal's Overthrow. Downes says of him (Ros. 

398 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

Ang.y p. 17): "Mr. Wintersel, was good in Tragedy, as well as 
in Comedy, especially in Cokes in Bartholomew Fair; that the 
Famous Comedian Nokes came in that part far short of him." 
Pepys praises him under date of April xS, 1668 (Diary, vii. 384): 
"To the King's house, and there did see Love in a Ma'^e, wherein 
very good mirth of Lacy, the clown, and Wintersell, the country- 
knight his master." He is said to been "an excellent judicious 
Actor and the best Instructor of others." He died in July, 1679 
(Downes, Ros. Ang., ed. Knight, p. xxx). Leslie Hotson, in The 
Commonwealth and Restoration Stage (1918), pp. 52.-53, has recently 
brought to light the records of a Chancery suit in 1654 between 
Wintershall and Andrew Cane, the actor. Cane, on April 30, 16x4, 
with other members of the Palsgrave's company, entered into a 
bond to Richard Gunnell, manager of the Palsgrave's men. Gun- 
nell died intestate, leaving his widow, Elizabeth, with two 
daughters, Margaret and Anne. The widow administered the 
estate. Later she married one John Robinson, who may be the 
actor. About 1641 she made her will, leaving the estate to her two 
daughters. Margaret had married Wintershall, Ann had married 
William Clarke. Upon the death of Anne, the Wintershalls 
laid claim to this "unadministered principal debt" of £40, 
secured by the bond dated April 30, 1614. The outcome is not 
known. 

WODERAM, RICHARD. 

Richard Woderam appears to have been the leader of Oxford's 
men at Ipswich in 1586-87, as suggested by a payment of 10s. to 
"Richard Woderam for the Erie of Oxfordes plaiers" (Murray, 
ii. 192.)- Chambers (Eli^.. Stage, ii. ioi«.) suggests that he is 
"more likely to have been an agent of the Corporation than a 
member of the company." 

WOOD, MARY. 
See Mary Clarke. 

399 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

WOOD, RICHARD. 

The register of St. Bodolph Aldgate records on April i8, 1613, 
the baptism of "Roger Wood, sonne to Richard Wood, a Stage- 
player in Houndsditch" (Dcnkinger, P.M.L.A., xli. 107). 

WOOD, WILLIAM. 

The register of St. Bodolph Aldgate records on September xy, 
1 61 5, the baptism of "Abraham Wood, sonne to William Wood, 
a Player of Interludes in Houndsditch" (Denkinger, P.M.L.A., 
xli. 107). 

WOODFORD, THOMAS. 

Thomas Woodford, described as a London merchant, was in 
some way interested in the Children of Paul's about 1600. Shortly 
after Christmas, 1600, he purchased from Chapman for twenty 
marks the play The Old Joiner of Aldgate, which was acted by the 
Children of Paul's under their new master, Edward Pearce, in 
1 601. In the lawsuit that followed the performance of the play, 
we have in 1603 "depositions by Woodford and Pearce that are 
of great interest" (Charles Sisson, The Library, N.S., viii, 192.7, 
pp. 40 ff.). He was a lessee of Whitefriars about 1607-08, and in 
February, 1608, sold his interest to David Lording Barry. He 
seems to have had some connection with the playhouse in i6ii, 
as suggested by a lawsuit between him and William Trevell in 
i64z (Adams, Playhouses, pp. 311-14, 33x; Chambers, Eliz.. 
Stage, ii. 350, 515-17). He was also interested in other theatrical 
enterprises. In 1613 and 1619 he was engaged in disputes with 
Aaron Holland in the Court of Requests concerning a seventh 
part and profits therefrom in the Red Bull (Wallace, N.U.S., ix. 
X9I fF.). Sisson writes in The Library, N.S., viii, 192.7, p. ^35: 
"I have found a later record of a case in the Court of Chancery in 
16x3-4 which concludes the story of his relation with the Red 
Bull, and recapitulates the incidents of his long struggle with 
Thomas Woodford, which he finally won." He appears as a wit- 

400 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

ness in the case of Witter against Heminges and Condell in 1619- 
zo, but his interest, if any, in the Globe is not known (Wallace, 
N.U.S., X. 74). 

WOODS, JOHN. 

John Woods appears as leader of a troupe of English players 
in Holland during 1604. On September 30, 1604, the Council of 
the city of Leyden gave his company permission to play at the 
approaching fair "certain decent pieces for the amusement of the 
people" (Cohn, p. Ixxvii). 

WOORTH, ELLIS. 

See Ellis Worth. 

WORTH, ELLIS. 

Ellis Worth belonged to Queen Anne's men before June, 1615, 
when he is mentioned in the Baskervile papers as a member of 
the company. He is also named in agreements with Susan Basker- 
vile in June, 1616 and 1617 QEliz- Stage, ii. 137-3 8). On October z, 
1617, he with others of the Queen's company petitioned the 
Sessions of Peace against the various presentments that had been 
issued against them for not ' 'repayringe the Highwayes neere the 
Red Bull" Qeaffreson, Middlesex, ii. 170). He is presumably the 
Ellis who appears in a stage-direction (line 186), "Enter 2. Lords, 
Sands, Ellis," of Robert Daborne's Poor Man s Comfort (ed. Swaen, 
p. 381), probably a play of Queen Anne's company at the Cockpit 
in Drury Lane, about 1617. On May 13, 1619, he attended Queen 
Anne's funeral as a representative of her London company. After 
the death of the Queen her London troupe was known as the 
Players of the Revels at the Red Bull; in 1612. Worth is noted as 
one of "the chiefe players" in this company (Adams, Dram. Rec, 
p. 63). By May, 1613, the company seems to have disbanded, for 
on May 13 of that year Worth and two of his fellows pleaded to 
be excused from their payments to Susan Baskervile, on the 
ground that the other players of the original agreement were 

401 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

either dead or with another troupe; and in 162.6 the court dis- 
missed the plea of Worth and Blaney, the two surviving plaintiffs. 
He is mentioned in connection with a lawsuit growing out of the 
presentation at the Red Bull in 16x4 of Keep the Widow Waking, 
but he deposed that he had nothing to do with the play, and had 
never seen it acted (Charles Sisson, "Keep the Widow Waking," 
The Library, N.S., viii, \<^'lj^. Worth was a member of Prince 
Charles's company by December 7, 163 1, when a license was 
granted to him, Joseph Moore, and Matthew Smith (Murray, 
i. 196, 199, ii8). During the same month (Adams, Dram. Rec, p. 
45) he acted with this company in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, 
appearing as Ardelio, a parasite (Marmion, Works, pp. 7., 6). He 
is named in a warrant of May 10, 1632., appointing several of 
Prince Charles's players as Grooms of the Chamber (Stopes, 
Jahrbuch, xlvi. 96). On December 10, 1635, ^^ served as joint- 
payee for performances at Court by the Prince's men (Steele, p. 
150). He is mentioned in the Norwich records of February zi, 
1638, when the company visited that town; but this does not 
necessarily mean that he was present, for the entry is a mere ab- 
stract of the 1631 license (Murray, ii. 358). The register of St. 
Giles's, Cripplegate, records the baptism of his daughter Jane on 
July 19, 1613, and of his son Elizeus on March 12., 1619; in these 
two records he is described as gentleman and player, respectively 
(^Elii. Stage, ii. 350). 

WRIGHT, JOHN. 

John Wright played Millescent, daughter to Agurtes, in Mar- 
mion's Holland's Leaguer, presented in December, 163 1 (Adams, 
Dram. Rec, p. 45), by "the high and mighty Prince Charles his 
servants, at the private house in Salisbury Court" (Marmion, 
Works, pp. X, 6). 

WYLKYNSON, JOHN. 

A record of the Court of Aldermen, of London, for May 2.7, 
1549, states: "John Wylkynson, coriour, who comenly sufFreth & 

402. 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

meynteyneth interludes & playes to be made and kept within 
his dwelling house, was streyghtly commandid no more to suffer 
eny suche pleyes there to be kept, vpon peyne of imprysonement" 
(Harrison, England, iv. 313). 

YOUNG, JOHN. 

John Young, mercer, and three of his fellows who had been 
players to Queen Jane before her death in 1537 are mentioned 
about 1538 in a Chancery suit concerning the payments for a 
horse hired "to beare there playing garments" (Stopes, Shak. 
Env., X36). On the death of John Roll in 1539 he became a Court 
Interluder, with wages of £3 Gs. 8d. a year. In 1546, at the death 
of Thomas Sudbury, he was allowed an "annuity" of the same 
amount. During 1540-42. he was receiving also a payment of id. 
a day. He was probably a Court Interluder until about 1553, and 
w^as still alive in 1569-70, when he drew an annuity of £3 6s. 8d. 
as "agitator comediarum." In one entry he is described as "Maker 
of Interludes, Comedies, and Playes." He is presumably the 
"right worshipful esquire John Yung," to whom William Bald- 
win's Beware the Cat (1553) is dedicated (Chambers, Eli^. Stage, 
ii. %on., 8x, 84;?.; Collier, H.E.D.P., i. 131, 134, 148, 149, and 
Bibl. Ace, i. 54). 

YOUNG, JOHN. 

John Young acted Haver, lover of Mistress Jane, in Shirley's 
Wedding (c. i6z6), and Leister, in Davenport's King John and 
Matilda (c. 162.9), both plays of Queen Henrietta's men at the 
Cockpit in Drury Lane. On March 10, 1635, he is recorded at 
Norwich, as a member of, presumably, the King's Revels com- 
pany, when the troupe applied for permission to act in that town 
(Murray, i. opp. 2.GG, ^79-80). 

YUNG, JOHN. 
See John Young. 



403 



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411 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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413 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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415 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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416 



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417 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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419 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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4ZI 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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42-3 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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4x4 



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42-5 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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4x6 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

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4x7 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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428 



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42-9 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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431 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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432- 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

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433 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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434 



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435 



A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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A DICTIONARY OF ACTORS 

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438 



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